American toddler’s latest lamentations.

Quo Vadis?
~~
That is, for the unlettered, to ask:
~~
Whence?
~~
I am taken very ill and Mrs Begg denies me access to the electronic toys of the toddler’s which, on having taken a peek today, inform that the Americans, as ever, love a good riot and they are having many such in States and cities ruthlessly controlled by The Children’s Party.
~~
I recall Mr Hedrick Smith, a swell guy and not a bad writer for a corespondent on that aging yellow rag, The New York Times, but then Rick is a fellow Scot and old like myself and men like Rick and I were ever gentlemanly.
~~
Rick was born under the reign of George V while I was born under that King’s son, George VI.
~~
During the last Democratic Party riots called, I think, Occupy Wall Street, Rick put these questions to the rioters in the pristine manner of our joint class and background:
~~
Quo Vadis?
~~
Again for the unlettered, that means:
~~
Where are you kids going with this riot?
~~
Which is, again, to ask:
~~
Whence?
~~
That is to ask~~if you succeed in Occupying Wall Street, after that:
~~
What are you going to do?
~~
Where are you going after your victory?
~~
Other then, that having made the starling discovery that there are rich guys and poor guys:
~~
After the toddlers secure the victory, just what will that victory mean?
~~
After the victory, what comes next?
~~
As, again, Hedrick so pithily put it:
~~
Where’s the follow through?
~~
To which I add only this in the case of the instant riots:
~~
Just what do you children want?
~~
~~
IN THE NAME OF GOD.
AMEN
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I wear the chain I forged in life.
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How short the list one could compile of those of whom it can be said that fame and money did not deprave?

day3

IL MIGLIOR FABBRO

1147013_363612750432676_183433089_o

 At Washington, capital city of the terminally self-absorbed, mortal man holds to fleeting, feeble and fallible opinion, God immutable fact.

~~~~~~~~~~~

November 2003 event 012
  • The rich man ought not be taxed at all~~he ought be compelled to employ and train the poor man~~directly~~
  • ~~
    The principal need in America today is~~financial and industrial De-Globalization~~to facilitate the promotion of the possibility for the average man to get and keep a good job with good benefits paid by the employer~~as was done not very long ago.~~
     clip_image002MA9982782-0001
     

     

    ~~Bene Nati, Bene Vestiti, Et Mediocriter Docti~~
    ~

    ~~La crema y nata~~

    ~

    ~~Artista de la conquista~

     

     
     
     
    ~~In sunshine and in shadow~~I hold tight to the Republican view of time and money~~I write night and day~~yet~~while impecunious~~I am vastly overpaid~~in that taking pay to do what I love is unfair~~to my employer~~in a fair system~~under such circumstances~~I should pay him~~not he me~~I am far, far too old a man to be sexually confused~~praise Jesus~~but I am yet young enough to be politically confused~~is anyone not~~in an absolute sense~~I am a Catholic Royalist~~in a practical sense~~I am a Classical Liberal~~a Gaullist~~a Bonapartist~~an American Nationalist  Republican~~in either sense~~my head is soon for the chopping block~~to hasten my interlude with Madame La Guillotine~~I write without fear~and without favor of~any man~~ 
    ~~
     
    Finis Origine Pendet…
     
     
    The escape commences…
     
    ~~
     
    September, 1957
     
    ~~
     
    Saint Jane Frances de Chantal Catholic parochial school, called, by anyone of any background, simply: “Chan~al,” a place where, of an autumn day in 1957, school,  for me,  began and ended in the first convening of the first grade in which a tiny nun, one Sister Dom Bosco, appeared before me, just behind the window appearing at far left of this photograph, and piped out this: “I may be small, but so then, is the Atom Bomb.”
    ~~
    My determination to escape school commenced immediately on hearing about this Atom Bomb business and took 16 dicey and arduous years to finally accomplish.~~
     
    ~~
     
    Non Sibi
     
     
    The escape continues…
     
     
    ~~
     
    September, 1966
     
    ~~
     
    The Cathedral Latin School
     
    ~~
     
     
    Finis Origine Pendet~
     
     
      ~~Κύριε ἐλέησον~~

    Rejoice and Glad!!

    Amen~~

     

    CUA_Cardinal_2008

    ~The Original Angry Bird~~The Catholic University of America Screaming Red Cardinal Mascot~~

     

     

    clip_image002MA9982782-0001
    ~~EX LIBRIS~~
     
    ~~THEOS EK MĒCHANĒS~~

     

    Friday, 31st July,~Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi, 2020

    
    Website: http://johndanielbegg.wordpress.com

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    "Jean-Marie Le Pen is a friend. He is dangerous for the political set because he's the only one who's sincere. He says out loud what many people think deep down, and what the politicians refrain from saying because they are either too demagogic or too chicken. Le Pen, with all his faults and qualities, is probably the only one who thinks about the interests of France before his own."~~
    French actor~~Alain Delon

    CONCEPT OF THE CATHOLIC AND ROYAL ARMY OF AMERICA (CRAA)
    The Catholic University of America
    Logo of The Catholic University of America.svg
    Seal of The Catholic University of America

    Motto~~Deus Lux Mea Est~~

    The escape concludes…

    ~~

    The Catholic University Of America, Washington, District of Columbia.

    ~~

    1976, Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi.

    ~~

     

    Acta Est Fabula.

    ~~

    Deus Vult.

    Image

    ~~Our Ubiquitous Presence~~

    The Queen~~

    Our Ruler now 68 years on~~

    Simply the best President we could ever hope to have~~

clip_image002MA9982782-0001Hedrick Smith - The Aspen Institute

Mr Hedrick Smith , fellow Scot and a swell fellow all around.

Advertising man are, far and away, the smartest men in the world.

Famous car adverts from 1920-1950 – European CEO

Americans read and remember, often for life:

Advertising signs that:

Annual model change was the result of affluence, technology ...

Con you into thinking:

1951 Camels Ad - John Wayne Picture - Ad

You’re the ONE:

Study reveals secret tobacco industry deals with Hollywood

Who can win what’s never been WON:

Seven decades of Coca-Cola advertising shows how the soft drink's ...

Who can do what’s never been DONE:

Meanwhile, the dreary hustle and bustle of life:

Goes on all around you.

IN THE NAME OF GOD.
AMEN
Praying Hands Personalized Prayer Card (Priced Per Card)
####################################################################
Index Librorum Prohibitorum
I wear the chain I forged in life.
article-2253237-00BCBB6C00000190-350_634x715

 

How short the list one could compile of those of whom it can be said that fame and money did not deprave?

day3

IL MIGLIOR FABBRO

1147013_363612750432676_183433089_o

 At Washington, capital city of the terminally self-absorbed, mortal man holds to fleeting, feeble and fallible opinion, God immutable fact.

~~~~~~~~~~~

November 2003 event 012
  • The rich man ought not be taxed at all~~he ought be compelled to employ and train the poor man~~directly~~
  • ~~
    The principal need in America today is~~financial and industrial De-Globalization~~to facilitate the promotion of the possibility for the average man to get and keep a good job with good benefits paid by the employer~~as was done not very long ago.~~
     clip_image002MA9982782-0001
     

     

    ~~Bene Nati, Bene Vestiti, Et Mediocriter Docti~~
    ~

    ~~La crema y nata~~

    ~

    ~~Artista de la conquista~

     

     
     
     
    ~~In sunshine and in shadow~~I hold tight to the Republican view of time and money~~I write night and day~~yet~~while impecunious~~I am vastly overpaid~~in that taking pay to do what I love is unfair~~to my employer~~in a fair system~~under such circumstances~~I should pay him~~not he me~~I am far, far too old a man to be sexually confused~~praise Jesus~~but I am yet young enough to be politically confused~~is anyone not~~in an absolute sense~~I am a Catholic Royalist~~in a practical sense~~I am a Classical Liberal~~a Gaullist~~a Bonapartist~~an American Nationalist  Republican~~in either sense~~my head is soon for the chopping block~~to hasten my interlude with Madame La Guillotine~~I write without fear~and without favor of~any man~~ 
    ~~
     
    Finis Origine Pendet…
     
     
    The escape commences…
     
    ~~
     
    September, 1957
     
    ~~
     
    Saint Jane Frances de Chantal Catholic parochial school, called, by anyone of any background, simply: “Chan~al,” a place where, of an autumn day in 1957, school,  for me,  began and ended in the first convening of the first grade in which a tiny nun, one Sister Dom Bosco, appeared before me, just behind the window appearing at far left of this photograph, and piped out this: “I may be small, but so then, is the Atom Bomb.”
    ~~
    My determination to escape school commenced immediately on hearing about this Atom Bomb business and took 16 dicey and arduous years to finally accomplish.~~
     
    ~~
     
    Non Sibi
     
     
    The escape continues…
     
     
    ~~
     
    September, 1966
     
    ~~
     
    The Cathedral Latin School
     
    ~~
     
     
    Finis Origine Pendet~
     
     
      ~~Κύριε ἐλέησον~~

    Rejoice and Glad!!

    Amen~~

     

    CUA_Cardinal_2008

    ~The Original Angry Bird~~The Catholic University of America Screaming Red Cardinal Mascot~~

     

     

    clip_image002MA9982782-0001
    ~~EX LIBRIS~~
     
    ~~THEOS EK MĒCHANĒS~~

     

    Friday, 17th July,~Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi, 2020

    
    Website: http://johndanielbegg.wordpress.com

    http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=122865699&trk=tab_pro

     http://www.facebook.com/JohnDanielBeggPublicAffairs
    
     http://www.tumblr.com/blog/theoldsoldiershome1952

    http://www.facebook.com/john.begg.33

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    http://independent.academia.edu/johnbegg/Papers?s=nav#add

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    Tweets: @jtdbegg

     http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=122865699&trk=hb_tab_pro_top
    
    "Jean-Marie Le Pen is a friend. He is dangerous for the political set because he's the only one who's sincere. He says out loud what many people think deep down, and what the politicians refrain from saying because they are either too demagogic or too chicken. Le Pen, with all his faults and qualities, is probably the only one who thinks about the interests of France before his own."~~
    French actor~~Alain Delon

    CONCEPT OF THE CATHOLIC AND ROYAL ARMY OF AMERICA (CRAA)
    The Catholic University of America
    Logo of The Catholic University of America.svg
    Seal of The Catholic University of America

    Motto~~Deus Lux Mea Est~~

    The escape concludes…

    ~~

    The Catholic University Of America, Washington, District of Columbia.

    ~~

    1976, Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi.

    ~~

     

    Acta Est Fabula.

    ~~

    Deus Vult.

    Image

    ~~Our Ubiquitous Presence~~

    The Queen~~

    Our Ruler now 68 years on~~

    Simply the best President we could ever hope to have~~

clip_image002MA9982782-0001

TRUST NO ONE.

84 Best Doris n Buck Duke images | Doris duke, Duke, Dory
James Buchanan Duke and baby daughter and sole heiress, Dee-Dee
Doris Duke - heiress to the tobacco tycoon James Buchanan Duke ...
******I here commence to quote from the fascinating work today of Mr Peter Lance for The Vanity Fair Magazine*****
FROM THE MAGAZINE
JULY/AUGUST 2020 ISSUE

Homicide at Rough Point

In the fall of 1966, billionaire Doris Duke killed a close confidant in tony Newport, Rhode Island. Local police ruled the incident “an unfortunate accident.” Half a century later, compelling evidence suggests that the mercurial, vindictive tobacco heiress got away with murder.

Image may contain Doris Duke Head Face Human Person Art Drawing Photo Photography and Portrait
An undated glamour portrait of Duke.HILTON ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES

On the last full day of his life—October 6, 1966—Eduardo Tirella flew into Newport, Rhode Island, the storied summer colony of the country’s old money families. He was met at the airport by Doris Duke, the richest woman in America, and they drove to Rough Point, her 10-acre estate on Bellevue Avenue—Newport’s Millionaire’s Row. Eddie, as friends knew Tirella, had just told intimates that after a decade as the artistic curator and designer of Duke’s estates in New Jersey, Bel Air, Honolulu, and Newport, he was planning to sever his professional ties with her, for good. Now, it was time to let his patron and constant companion know, face-to-face.

The handsome Tirella, a war hero and Renaissance man, had just finished advising on a new Tony Curtis film, Don’t Make Waves, and was amping up his Hollywood career. Anxious to move to the West Coast full-time, he intended to load his effects into a rented Dodge station wagon, drop them at his family’s home in New Jersey, and then fly back to California. But nobody left Doris Duke without consequences. Notoriously jealous and known for her violent temper, she’d once stabbed her common-law husband with a butcher knife when he’d angered her. And Tirella, who was gay, had been warned by his lover and friends that Duke might overreact to his pending departure.

Late the next afternoon, Tirella and Duke had a heated argument, overheard by the estate’s staff. Moments later, the pair got into the station wagon with Tirella behind the wheel and headed off for an appointment. Approaching the property’s immense iron gates, Eduardo stopped the car and got out to unlock the chain that held them closed.

OPPOSITES ATTRACT    Interior designer and Hollywood insider Eduardo Eddie Tirella Doris Dukes trusted adviser circa 1960.
OPPOSITES ATTRACT
Interior designer and Hollywood insider Eduardo “Eddie” Tirella, Doris Duke’s trusted adviser, circa 1960.
COURTESY OF DONNA LOHMEYE.

Suddenly, Duke slid into the driver’s seat, released the parking brake, shifted into drive, and hit the accelerator. The two-ton wagon sped toward Tirella, burst through the gates, smashed a fence across the street, and crashed into a tree. As Duke sat stunned behind the wheel, Tirella’s body lay crushed under the rear axle.

With massive injuries to his lungs, spinal cord, and brain, he died instantly. Ninety-six hours later, with no inquest—and basing their account of the crash entirely on the word of Duke—Newport police chief Joseph A. Radice declared the death accidental. Case closed.

If Doris Duke is remembered at all today, it is as an eccentric tobacco heiress and philanthropist who, through her civic largesse, helped Newport regain much of its architectural glory of old. Down through the years, she acquired a curious assortment of friends, such as Imelda Marcos and Michael Jackson, along with a trail of lovers. Possessed of a voracious sexual appetite, she had rumored affairs with many an alpha male, including General George Patton and actors Errol Flynn and Marlon Brando. But New Englanders associate her most of all with Rough Point, her Newport mansion visited each year by thousands, who tour the stately rooms while guides lavish praise on the late billionaire.

Adding to this largely laudatory portrait is a new biography by author Sallie Bingham, The Silver Swan: In Search of Doris Duke, which devotes only 15 paragraphs to the homicide and continues to perpetuate the theory that Tirella’s death was an accident. Drawing on previously undisclosed information from Duke’s personal papers, Bingham treats her subject with a reverence that borders on hagiography. She describes Duke as a renegade; a singular, spectacular character forged in the Jazz Age; and a business savant who tripled her father’s fortune—in short, as Bingham puts it, the very archetype of “the New Woman.”

That picture reinforces the adulatory narrative, one that conveniently marginalizes Eduardo Tirella, her trusted companion for more than a decade. Indeed, when Duke died at age 80, in 1993—leaving a fortune of $1.3 billion—her sprawling New York Times obituary mentioned him in only a single sentence.

The undercarriage of the vehicle  that killed Eduardo Tirella October 1966.
The undercarriage of the vehicle (note the bloodstain on the ground) that killed Eduardo Tirella, October 1966. 

BY ED QUIGLEY/COURTESY OF JOHN QUIGLEY.

To understand why, it helps to understand the events that followed the crash.

Just eight days later, Duke donated $25,000 (equal to $199,000 today) to restore historic Cliff Walk, the public promenade behind the mansions that line Newport’s shoreline. She also gave more than $10,000 to Newport Hospital, where she’d been sequestered on the night Tirella was killed. In the following months, she began to set up the Newport Restoration Foundation, which, in time, would renovate 84 Colonial-era buildings. And that’s not all. Seven months after Tirella’s death, Radice retired, eventually purchasing a pair of Florida condos. The inspector who had questioned Duke after the incident was named as Radice’s replacement, leapfrogging over his logical successor, the captain of detectives, to become the new chief. Another cop who had interviewed Duke was promoted to sergeant.

Townspeople were surprised by Duke’s sudden burst of philanthropy. Today, Tirella’s niece sees it not just as a cover-up but as something worse. “She killed him twice,” Donna Lohmeyer told me. “She destroyed his body and then she eviscerated his memory.” What’s more, Duke went on to wage a protracted court battle, refusing to settle with Tirella’s heirs, who had been willing to accept as little as $200,000 in damages—at a time when Duke was making $1 million a week in interest on her fortune.

Five years after “the accident,” a Providence courtroom was the setting for a 10-day, $1.25 million wrongful-death trial. According to the attorneys for the family, Tirella, 42, had earned $43,000 ($351,000 today) the year he died, and could have realized that sort of income for decades. Duke testified that she “always asked Eduardo’s advice before buying or planning anything for her estates.” He had counseled her on the purchase of art worth tens of millions and transformed the abandoned greenhouses on her New Jersey property into a spectacular botanical display. She had even set aside living quarters in each of her five estates to keep him close at hand.

In the end, Doris Duke was actually found negligent in Tirella’s homicide. And yet during the damage phase of the trial, her lawyer portrayed him as a ne’er-do-well. The verdict: After legal fees and expenses, each of his five sisters and three brothers received $5,620. “It was shameful, when you think of what he had done for her,” says Pola Zanay, 86, an artist and longtime friend of Tirella’s. “It was the worst kind of character assassination.” And what could have been Duke’s motive for killing Tirella? In Zanay’s view, it was simple: “She hated the idea of him leaving her.

Agay man in the 1960s, Tirella, and his lover, Edmund Kara, a prominent sculptor, had many friends in the arts, including designers, musicians, and actors, such as Richard Burton, David Niven, James Coburn, and Sharon Tate. Tirella himself had an impressive background. He’d been a performer in New Jersey nightclubs in the early 1940s, falling in with Frank Sinatra. Tirella’s niece Donna Lohmeyer says that her mother “remembered them coming home to eat Italian after some of Frank’s dates at the Meadowbrook, where [bandleader] Tommy Dorsey played. But the war changed all that.” In 1943, Tirella enlisted in the Army and shipped off to Europe, earning a Bronze Star for his service in the Battle of the Bulge.

Once he returned Stateside, he took a job running the millinery department at Saks, creating hats for gossip doyennes Hedda Hopper and Louella Parsons. A talented interior designer as well, he was soon working on the houses of the well heeled and landing occasional parts in films. Tirella refurbished Peggy Lee’s L.A. home and created Elizabeth Taylor’s beach house for the 1965 Hollywood production The Sandpiper. Vogue even ran a piece featuring his design for the kitchen at Falcon Lair, the Duke mansion in Benedict Canyon, once owned by Rudolph Valentino.

Along with her estates, however, courtrooms were Duke’s natural habitat. She had accumulated many enemies across the decades and generated years of legal cases, several involving her butler Bernard Lafferty, who was later accused of hastening her death. “Doris was bent on controlling the narrative of her mangled legacy,” says her onetime business manager Patrick Mahn. As he told New York in 1993, “Litigation was her favorite foreplay.” Starting at age 13, when Duke sued her own mother for control of her inheritance, she was involved in more than 40 lawsuits. “She could be incredibly vindictive,” insists Mahn, who coauthored Daddy’s Duchess, a scathing Duke biography. After he stopped working for her, Mahn claims, “she went bonkers and sicced the legal dogs on me.” Her godson, Pony Duke, who cowrote another tell-all, Too Rich, put it this way: “Doris gave no second chances. She collected people and then she threw them away.”

Duke in a littleknown Cecil Beaton portrait from the early 1930s.
Duke, in a little-known Cecil Beaton portrait from the early 1930s.BY CECIL BEATON/CONDÉ NAST ARCHIVE.

Some attribute her authoritarian personality to her father, James Buchanan Duke, who had made his first fortune with the American Tobacco Company. On his deathbed, he had reportedly warned his daughter, “Trust no one.” She’d been famously paranoid ever since.

Dee Dee, as her close friends called her, took to hiring ex-FBI agents to intimidate disgruntled friends and lovers who might be sources for reporters or biographers. Ex-staffers were threatened and bullied. Mysteriously, the entire case file for Tirella’s wrongful-death lawsuit has vanished from the Rhode Island Judicial Archives. In 1990, the dossier on the police investigation of the case was reported missing from the Newport Police Department. Even the negative of the photograph of the crashed 1966 Dodge Polara station wagon, which made the front page of the Newport Daily News the next day, disappeared from the archives at the Newport Historical Society.

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The fire department’s logbook, however, still survives; it was recently discovered in the attic at headquarters. And its blunt description of the crash brings it all back into focus. According to the entry for that night, the first alarm came in at 5:07 p.m.: “Received call for auto accident…woman was hurt, car went (out) of control. Man…under car.” The 4,000-pound Dodge was so heavy that the power jacks on the ambulance couldn’t raise it, so a tow truck was summoned. By 5:40 p.m., in separate vehicles, Doris Duke and the lifeless body of Eduardo Tirella were speeding toward Newport Hospital.

Igrew up in Newport, the Colonial capital that thrived on the triangle trade of molasses, rum—and slaves. The riches from those ventures helped finance the American Revolution. A century later, Gilded Age families like the Vanderbilts, Astors, and Belmonts built a necklace of “summer cottages” around Newport’s famed Ocean Drive. But since 1723, when 26 sailors were hanged as pirates on a warm summer day before what historians called “a jubilant crowd,” Newport has always been a town steeped in moral ambiguity: a bastion of religious tolerance built on the scourge of slavery. Jackie Kennedy, whose mother’s estate was in Newport, would sign on as Duke’s No. 2 on the Newport Restoration Foundation and, given Duke’s ongoing efforts to refurbish the town, few on Millionaire’s Row or in the working-class waterfront streets raised too many questions about that “unpleasantness” up at Rough Point back in 1966.

Eight months after Tirella’s death, I got my first job in journalism as a cub reporter for the Newport Daily News. I would go on to a career as an investigative reporter and network news correspondent, later writing books on counterterrorism and organized crime. But the truth of what happened at Rough Point gnawed at me.

Then, in 2016, when candidate Donald Trump declared, “I could stand in the middle of Fifth Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn’t lose any voters,” it took me back to that incident. Somehow, the notion of a billionaire openly bragging that he could get away with murder sent me home to the story I should have covered in the summer of ’67. I had to know: Was Eduardo Tirella’s death really an accident? Or did the heir to one of America’s great fortunes turn a vehicle into a murder weapon—then conspire with the local authorities to cover it up?

When I started to kick over rocks, I was surprised by the number of Newporters with passionate opinions about the “accident.” On one popular Newport Facebook group, members regularly dissect the details of the case. Using that portal as a starting point, I reached out to people who claimed to have personal knowledge of the crash or its aftermath. One was Denise Clement, whose late mother, Rosemarie, was Police Chief Radice’s secretary at the time. Today, she is adamant: “My mother always said Doris Duke bought the city of Newport and got away with murder. She read the full police report and knew that there was a cover-up. After she retired and we drove past those houses that Doris had restored, she’d say, ‘Blood money paid for all this.’ ”

Linda McFarlane Knierim’s Facebook entries stood out too. Her father had been the caretaker at Rough Point on what Linda called “that horrible night.” She posted: “The help were all in shock. When I came into the kitchen they were crying and holding each other. I believe they all thought it was an accident. I know others believe differently.”

The more I dug into the mystery, the more I saw it as a story about class, privilege, and the concentration of wealth—one that resonates more than ever in the Trump era.

Left Tirella in the early 1950s. Right Duke at Duke Gardens Hillsboro New Jersey 1968. Background harborside at Newport.
Left: Tirella in the early 1950s. Right: Duke at Duke Gardens, Hillsboro, New Jersey, 1968. Background: harborside at Newport.LEFT, COURTESY OF DONNA LOHMEYER; RIGHT, BY PHILIP HARRINGTON/ALAMY; BACKGROUND BY IAIN MCGILLIVRAY/ALAMY.
Clockwise from top left Duke returning from a trip abroad 1966 Duke in an undated glamour portrait Tirella with actress...
Clockwise from top left: Duke returning from a trip abroad, 1966; Duke in an undated glamour portrait; Tirella with actress Sharon Tate in Big Sur in the mid-’60s. Background: harborside at Newport.CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT, FROM BRIDGEMAN IMAGES, HILTON ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES, COURTESY OF DONNA LOHMEYE; BACKGROUND BY IAIN MCGILLIVRAY/ALAMY.

On Saturday, October 8, 1966, the morning after Eduardo Tirella’s death, the lead story in the Newport Daily News would soon make international news: “Newport police this morning refused to indicate when they would question Doris Duke, who was at the wheel of a station wagon that killed her 42-year-old male friend yesterday afternoon.… The only witness was Miss Duke who was admitted to Newport Hospital suffering from facial cuts and severe shock.”

The article continued, “Dr. Philip C. McAllister, acting state medical examiner, said Tirella died instantly of brain injuries.” What the story didn’t reveal was that after Duke entered the hospital that night, McAllister, a Rhode Island official, agreed, then and there, to become her personal doctor. He promptly placed her in a secure, private room, which made it impossible for state investigators to question her. In effect, the man legally charged with determining the official cause of death had gone on Doris Duke’s payroll.

McAllister told a reporter for the New York Daily News he “doubted Miss Duke knew what had happened,” calling it a “freak accident.” Explaining why he’d decided to keep investigators at bay, he said, “It would have been inhumane to make her recall the tragedy so soon.” The reporter then asked if it could have been anything but an accident. “Unthinkable,” McAllister replied. “I think they were devoted.”

The first time the Newport PD was able to question Duke was on Sunday, October 9, two days after the crash. It was a brief interview conducted in her bedroom at Rough Point in the presence of her New York attorney, Wesley Fach, and her business manager. Lieutenant Frank Walsh took her statement along with Detective George Watts as Duke sat in bed, flanked by a pair of German shepherds.

That bedside encounter produced the first of two “official statements” by Duke. Both were contained in the formal police report, which had gone missing for decades. That is, until last fall, when a government official heard that I was digging into the Tirella matter and thought the truth should come out. Within a few days, the long-lost 16-page file was emailed to me.

The report, which I have since authenticated, contained two “interviews” with Duke. The first, dated October 9, was a brief, four-question transcript of the bedroom statement. The next day Chief Radice summarized that account for the Associated Press, adding that “Tirella…was crushed against the iron gates, and then dragged across Bellevue Avenue and pinned under the car.” Calling the incident “an unfortunate accident,” he declared the case closed.

TO THE MANOR BORN    Dukes Newport Rhode Island estate Rough Point.
TO THE MANOR BORN
Duke’s Newport, Rhode Island, estate, Rough Point.
FROM BRIDGEMAN IMAGES.

But almost immediately, Radice was criticized by the state’s attorney general, J. Joseph Nugent, who announced that he was “dissatisfied” with the weekend investigation. The chief also came under fire for releasing scant information to the press, as reflected in a front-page story in the New York Daily News, headlined: “COPS CLAM UP ON DORIS QUIZ.” So Radice quickly walked back his verdict, insisting that the probe was still open.

It was at that point, according to Newport attorney William O’Connell, that Radice told Duke’s Rhode Island lawyer, Aram Arabian, that he needed something more to close out the case. So Arabian suggested that the police “write something up” and if he approved, Doris would sign it. O’Connell—who practiced law with a close associate of Arabian’s—insisted (and the official file confirms) that the police then created what they represented as a three-page transcript of an interrogation of Duke, purportedly conducted at Rough Point the following day. In fact, it was a “script” made to appear as the Q&A of a real-time interview so contrived that it got Duke’s birth date wrong—an error that she had to correct and initial by hand.

Five days after the accident—with this second “interview” inserted into the record—the case was finally closed. On Wednesday, October 12, the New York Times reported that “the police termed today as ‘Definitely an accident’ the death of Eduardo Tirella…Chief Radice said.” That same day, the chief of detectives told the Providence Journal, “There was no evidence of foul play.”

For the volatile heiress, it was over. Doris Duke escaped any criminal liability. And the $75,000 in civil damages that she was later forced to pay to Tirella’s family didn’t even equal the cost of the Goddard Chippendale highboy she had bought a month before the trial, at Parke-Bernet, for $102,000—a record price at the time for a piece of furniture.

The police report, however, was not the only account of the crash. Hunting through the National Archives, I managed to find a 173-page interrogatory prepared for a parallel case involving Avis Rent-a-Car Systems, the owner of the station wagon. Filed in federal court and presumably unseen for 50 years, it reveals additional admissions from Duke herself:

Edward Tirella drove the automobile up to 12 or 15 feet from the north gate. I was sitting in the passenger’s seat. He got out to open the gate which was locked. I moved over to the driver’s seat. I put my left foot on the brake and moved the gear shift lever from “park” to “drive.” The car immediately moved forward through the gates and across Bellevue Avenue where it struck a fence and stopped. I was injured and dazed. I looked around for Mr. Tirella. I did not see him. I went back into the house to see if he was there. A man and a woman helped me.

A man and a woman. The first civilians on the scene were Lewis Thom of Milwaukee and his daughter Judith, a nurse who’d just been commissioned as an ensign at the Newport Navy base. They were sightseeing at the time.

I tracked down Judith Thom Wartgow, now retired after 30 years as a paramedic. “We were driving down Bellevue Avenue,” she recalls, “when we came upon this accident. The car was against a tree across the road from this open gate. When I got out, this tall woman was in the street, walking back and forth, hysterical. We started to look around the car to see if someone was hurt, when she took off for the house running, so I followed.”

Once inside the mansion, Wartgow remembers, Duke ran up to the second floor, calling for someone, but she soon circled back outside. “I was trying to get her to stop,” she says. She told police at the time that Duke “came down the stairs saying she had run over Ed.” That recollection ran counter to Doris’s claim in the Avis case that she’d rushed into the house in search of him. But by this point, Wartgow had gotten a good look at Doris’s face. In the New York Daily News coverage of the crash, McAllister stated that Duke needed 30 stitches; the Newport Daily News noted that the two strangers who had arrived on the scene had found her “bleeding from head cuts.” Five decades later, Wartgow disagrees emphatically. “No. She had a few bruises and scratches. But nothing where blood was running down her face.” The ex-nurse seemed surprised by that detail, since she’d left Newport the next day and had never read the press accounts.

“Very little about the way the Newport police handled this had anything to do with responsible homicide investigation,” says retired NYPD detective James Moss, who has cleared hundreds of murder cases for Brooklyn South Homicide. In 2018, I asked him to visit Newport to examine the evidence I’d uncovered. “You’d absolutely want to question witnesses in-depth on the relationship between the killer and decedent to determine if the death involved ‘intent.’ But they wrapped this one up on the basis of a fabricated Q&A requested by the person-of-interest’s own lawyers. Astonishing.”

SCENE OF THE CRIME    A view through the mansions smashed gates by news photographer Ed Quigley. At far right detective...
SCENE OF THE CRIME
A view through the mansion’s smashed gates by news photographer Ed Quigley. At far right: detective Fred Newton, who had a surprising theory about how Tirella died.
BY ED QUIGLEY/COURTESY OF JOHN QUIGLEY.

Prior to the crash, Chief Radice, like many locals, had had his own run-ins with Duke. For years, she had unleashed her German shepherds to roam the Rough Point grounds, causing multiple attacks on passersby. In May 1964, after two tourists on Cliff Walk were victimized in a single week, Radice ordered “the destruction or removal” of two of the dogs. Doris, in response, erected a chain-link fence, effectively placing an impassable barrier along the walkway, one of the state’s top tourist attractions.

Then, shortly after Tirella’s death, Duke’s foundation made that generous gift to restore Cliff Walk. The following May, Chief Radice retired after 42 years on the job. At the time, his annual salary had been $7,000. Four years later, he bought the first of two condo units in a new building in Hollywood, Florida.

Today, Radice’s granddaughter Elayne Paranzino says she’s lived ever since with rumors that Radice, who died in 1997, had been bought off by Duke. “I confronted my grandfather one day,” she contends. “I said, ‘Don’t you lie to me.’ He said ‘Elayne, none of these rumors are true. I didn’t get any money from her.’ Then, when I pressed him, he chuckled. ‘You think I was paid off? You can have it if we can find it.’ ”

Doris Duke’s two husbands disappointed her in different ways. First, there was Palm Beach socialite James Cromwell, 16 years her senior, whose check bounced when he tried to pay for their 1935 honeymoon. Next came Dominican playboy Porfirio Rubirosa, whose legendary male endowment was compared to a pepper mill. Duke showered Rubirosa with gifts, including polo ponies and an estate in France. But the marriage eventually soured and they divorced in 1948.

Then, in the early ’50s, Duke met a young jazz musician named Joseph Armand Castro, who would soon take her on the wildest ride of her long life. Fifteen years younger than Duke, Castro was a piano prodigy and band leader who played with everyone from Louis Armstrong to Zoot Sims. According to Stephanie Mansfield, author of the Duke biography The Richest Girl in the World, Joe first met Doris at a concert in Honolulu. She then invited him back to Shangri La, her Diamond Head estate. By 1953 they were living together at the Bel Air Hotel, and he later claimed that she bought Falcon Lair for the two of them.

Up through the early ’60s, they were often in a booze-and-drug-fueled haze. Pony Duke observed that even though Duke believed Castro “to be a musical genius, perhaps the greatest jazz pianist in the world,” over time she became envious of the attention he got onstage. Desperate he might leave her, Duke had frequent bouts of depression, deepened by alcohol, barbiturates, and Castro’s temper. Their fights got more violent, and one night in 1963 at Shangri La, while Doris was playing a jazz piece, Castro supposedly made a crack, so she grabbed a butcher knife and slashed his arm.

On New Year’s Day 1964, she threw him out of Falcon Lair. He soon filed the first of three lawsuits, including one for assault and battery, alleging that she’d “attempted to kill” him, causing “a large permanent scar” that prevented him from working. He asked for $150,000. But within weeks, Castro was strong-armed by Duke’s attorneys, who held him incommunicado in Honolulu, persuading him, against his own lawyer’s advice, to renounce his litigation.

Within a year or so, Duke coaxed Castro back to Falcon Lair, set up a recording company for him, and promised to include him in her will. She’d already bought him a Mercedes 300 SL 300, worth the equivalent of $100,000. For the next year, things between them seemed to stabilize.

Then in the summer of 1965, her ex-husband Rubirosa was killed when he crashed his Ferrari 250 GT in Paris, and Doris lapsed into another depression. With Castro unable to console her, she spent more and more time with Tirella. By the following March, Duke, then 53, was growing angrier at Castro, after he was spotted with Loretta Haddad, a beautiful young singer.

 

In May 1966, Duke abruptly pulled the plug on Castro’s record company, where Peter Brooke was an executive. Not long after, in author Mansfield’s account, Brooke was awakened at 3 a.m. by a desperate Duke, begging him to rush over to Falcon Lair. When he got there, a maid led him into the kitchen where, as Mansfield tells it, “the room had been ransacked, broken dishes thrown on the floor. Standing in the open frame of a French window, wearing a T shirt, though naked from the waist down, was Castro, urinating over the railing into the garden below.” Brooke reportedly found Duke in her bedroom with a broken jaw. “The next morning,” Mansfield writes, “Doris fled Hollywood for Newport, accompanied by Eduardo Tirella.”

By the mid-1960s, after toiling for Duke for years and getting routinely underpaid, Tirella had finally broken out. He got an up-front credit for his design work on The Sandpiper. His partner, Edmund Kara, sculpted the bust of Elizabeth Taylor that was a plot point in the film. Taylor’s love interest was played by Charles Bronson, with whom Tirella appeared in a short scene shot at Nepenthe, a legendary restaurant high above the coast. “Between Big Sur and the house they shared in Laurel Canyon, Eduardo and Edmund had a full life,” says Kara’s friend Glen Cheda. “By 1966, they’d arrived at the epicenter of the West Coast art-and-music scene.”

In the book Canyon of Dreams, critic Kirk Silsbee describes how “Tirella’s renowned home parties [were] gatherings for creative people,” including actors Alan Ladd and Dennis Hopper. “He had a little Morgan sports car,” says his friend Pola Zanay, “and we’d drive up to Big Sur on Fridays. He and Edmund lived on an old Boy Scout camp near Nepenthe. On weekends they’d throw musicales—Eduardo loved to sing, so he’d have Bobby Short playing the piano. Kim Novak lived up there. She and I would lie in a loft above the living area sipping Champagne. It was a fabulous time.”

Around this period, Tirella was making the transition to set design, writes Silsbee, and that “didn’t sit well with Doris Duke.” After he went to work on his next film project, Don’t Make Waves, costarring his close friend Sharon Tate, the tensions escalated. “Doris was panicked,” observes Pony Duke in Too Rich. “Her entire life revolved around [Tirella’s] ability to make things [for her] look beautiful. She pleaded with him not to leave her… [But] Tirella was tiring of Doris Duke’s mood swings. He was worried that his motion picture design career was suffering because all of his time was being monopolized.”

The antique that Tirella was en route to appraise the night he died.
The antique that Tirella was en route to appraise the night he died. 

BY ADAM FITHERS.

Events came to a head in the late summer of ’66. “He was going back to Newport to tell her in person that he was leaving her employ,” says Cheda. “Edmund felt strongly that he shouldn’t go. He was fearful, because of his knowledge of what Doris was capable of.” His niece Donna concurs, “He told us the same thing. But Uncle Eddie felt he could control Doris. It was going to be this final curating job, and he’d be out.”

Zanay also recalls Tirella’s reservations about making the trip. As a precaution, she says, he consulted a clairvoyant named Dr. Jacques Hondorus, nicknamed the Psychic to the Stars: “Eduardo really wanted to extricate himself from Doris’s clutches. But it turned out that he needed major dental work that ran into the thousands of dollars. The only source he had to get that kind of money was by doing a job for her. So he went to Jacques to have a reading and Jacques advised him absolutely not to go back to Doris.”

“What makes this story such a tragedy,” she adds, “is that Eduardo was literally killed on the night before the rest of his life.”

There have been various theories about where Tirella and Duke were headed that fateful Friday. Chief Radice maintained that they were on their way to dinner. And yet Linda McFarlane Knierim, the caretaker’s daughter, insists, “My mom told me that they were going to meet somebody. A brief meeting. Because the cooks were preparing a meal for when they came back.”

Harle Tinney, a neighbor of Duke’s in the 1960s, supplies the answer. “One of my family’s very best friends,” she says, “was John Perkins Brown, an antique dealer in Newport. He approached us and said, ‘I’ve acquired an extraordinary piece; the bust of a woman, 15th or 16th century.’ ” It was a reliquary, one of a number of artworks created over the centuries to contain the bone of a saint—in this case, Saint Ursula, who had been martyred in the fourth century A.D.

“John Brown offered to sell it for $2,500,” says Tinney, “but it was too rich for our blood. So, he said, ‘I’ll sell it to Doris.’ ” It took months to restore the piece and, before Duke took possession, she wanted it appraised. “She never bought a work of art without consulting Eduardo, and that’s why she’d coaxed him back to Newport. They were on their way to John’s shop, The Blue Cat, late that afternoon to pick it up.”

And what about the staff at Rough Point, who were working in or around the 30-room mansion? Over the years, one theory of the crash stood out among the help. Some believed that because the estate’s iron gates opened inward, Duke, unfamiliar with the rental car, had to put the vehicle in reverse to allow the gates to swing open freely, but, in her confusion, she hit the gas.

Johnny Nutt, Duke’s former gardener, says that other staffers had a different take on the crash. “Miss Duke and Mr. Tirella,” he told me, “had a big argument that night as they left the house. He wanted to go back to Hollywood to resume his career. They got in the car. Mr. Tirella was driving. He got out to open the gate, but he left it in drive with the emergency brake on. He was going to come back and get in the car, drive it through, and lock it behind him. But for some reason, Miss Duke decided to drive. She was a big woman, a lot taller than him, and as she slid across the seat to drive it out, her knee hit the brake release. The car jerked forward. She went to slam on the brake, but she hit the gas. That’s the way I heard it.”

Nutt’s explanation is puzzling. First, because it suggests that Tirella intended to return to the vehicle and drive it after opening the gates. In her first statement to police, Duke had said that it was routine for her to slide over behind the wheel; something she’d done “a hundred times before.”

Moreover, in many vehicles of that era the driver engaged the parking brake with his left foot and released it by pulling back on it. Still, it was difficult to believe, knowing Duke as well as he did, that Tirella would leave the car in drive—and turn his back on her—whether the parking brake was on or not. In fact, the owner’s manual of the 1966 Dodge Polara clears things up. The parking brake on that model could only be disengaged by pulling a release lever located on the left side of the dashboard by hand. Not only would it have been impossible to release the brake on the floor by foot, but in some Polara models there was also an optional warning signal that flashed red when the brake was engaged.

As noted earlier, in the case against Avis, Duke stated that when Tirella got out to open the gate, “I moved over to the driver seat. I put my left foot on the brake and moved the gear shift lever from ‘park’ to ‘drive.’ ” In the wrongful-death trial, Tirella family attorney Edward Friedman had declared that “Miss Duke released the brake.” Since releasing the brake would have been a conscious act, was it somehow possible that Duke mistook the gas for the brake? “Not likely,” says ex-detective James Moss, “when you consider the size of the brake and accelerator pedals in that model wagon. The brake was horizontal, and the gas pedal was vertical. It defies belief that anyone could confuse them.”

That conclusion was later confirmed by a state official who appeared on the scene that night. At 10:30 p.m., Lewis Perrotti, an investigator for the Rhode Island Registry of Motor Vehicles, arrived at the mansion, having driven from Providence. “I was by myself,” says Perrotti, now 86. “It was dark. Using a flashlight, I saw tire marks in the driveway gravel inside the gate. Later that morning, my partner Al Masserone and I tried to question Doris Duke when she got back from the hospital, but a battery of lawyers had arrived, and they wouldn’t let us see her.”

By law, the registry’s investigators were supposed to question all drivers in vehicular homicides. “They put us off all day and then the police said we could be present when they interviewed her on Sunday.” But Perrotti says that when he and Masserone returned the following morning, they were told at the police station that the interview was already in progress.

“So, we rushed up to the estate. When we got there, they were just about finished. She was in bed with lawyers around her and two big dogs on either side. Lieutenant Walsh and the detective [Watts] were wrapping it up. We were allowed to observe, but we didn’t get to ask her any questions. It was almost like the fix was already in.”

The morning after Perrotti’s first visit, Tirella’s brother-in-law Robert Aughey, an engineer and former Marine captain, arrived at Rough Point with his teenage son, Robert Jr. They had driven from New Jersey, and at 6:30 a.m. the sun was just coming up. Aughey later testified under oath that he’d photographed tire-width “gouges” in the driveway, an inch and a half to 2 inches deep, 30 feet from the gate. “I remember those gouges clearly,” Robert Jr. told me. “It was like someone was sitting in the car, stomped on the gas, and made deep impressions in the gravel.”

Under Rhode Island criminal law, the degree of culpability in a homicide hinges on the issue of intent. Apart from Murder One—typically reserved for the killing of law enforcement officers—second-degree murder is a function of “malice aforethought.” Traffic deaths are usually associated with “manslaughter” because they involve accidents, which are, by definition, unintended. So what happened in this case? We know that Tirella got out of the car and walked to the gates. From Duke’s October 9 bedroom statement, we know that Tirella had just enough time to reach the lock when the station wagon “leaped forward.” The damage to the gates shows that they were struck virtually head-on at a point when they were still closed.

With the help of Donna Lohmeyer, I managed to ferret out Tirella’s official autopsy report, which had been misfiled in the basement of the Rhode Island medical examiner’s office for five decades—under the name “Tirella, Edmund” (not Eduardo). It shows that his injuries were entirely inconsistent with the official theory of the crash. Although Duke had at first told the authorities that Tirella “was crushed against the iron gates,” the report filed by the pathologist, Dr. James J. Flanagan, notes that except for a right hip fracture, all of Tirella’s other injuries were to his upper body. He sustained zero damage to his legs.

The Polara wagon was six-and-a-half feet wide. It was idling 15 feet back from the gates, more than enough room to open them without Duke having to put the vehicle in reverse. Then, in an instant, it hurtled toward Tirella from a dead stop. And yet, all the damage to the gates occurred in an area below the level of Tirella’s waist. So, if Doris Duke had crushed him against those gates, as she’d told police, why were there no injuries to his lower body?

The answer began to emerge when I got hold of an unpublished photo taken by a news photographer who’d shot the scene. It came to my attention courtesy of Jane Maguire. Her husband, John Quigley, was the stepson of the late Ed Quigley, who had been a photographer for the Newport Daily News when I worked there. I reached out to the Quigleys, who searched their basement and found some of Ed’s old negatives and prints. Within that cache was a wide-angle shot of the crash scene. Visible near a bicycle, at left, are three of the five balusters that had snapped off the gates as they were bent outward, over the metal-covered “stop,” embedded in the driveway to hold the gates in place.

Joseph G. Silvia, the 88-year-old blacksmith who’d repaired the gates, remembers that “they were exceptionally heavy. Wrought iron. It would have taken quite a bit of force for them to go up and over that stop.”

The picture reveals something else significant: the man in the fedora at the lower right-hand of the frame. His name was Fred Newton, a detective sergeant. I went back and found a profile of him that I’d written in 1967 on how he’d trained all of the Newport PD’s recruits. He was known as a straight shooter, who always conducted himself by the book. Over the years, I had lost touch with Fred, who’d died in 1999. But 14 years after Tirella’s death, he’d become chief of the Newport PD himself, and my sense was that if anyone had discovered what really happened at Rough Point that night, it would have been Fred Newton.

And so he did. I finally learned what he’d learned after I located the first officer who showed up on the scene while Duke was still in the car, wedged against that tree.

CRASH COURSE    From top The next day the homicide dominated the local paper Dukes bedroom where detectives questioned...
CRASH COURSE
From top: The next day the homicide dominated the local paper; Duke’s bedroom, where detectives “questioned” her. Background: the mansion’s gates.
TOP, NEWPORT DAILY NEWS, OCTOBER 8, 1966; BOTTOM, BY ADAM FITHERS.
Clockwise from top The wrecked Dodge wagon the estates gates were damaged in the crashbut tellingly Tirellas legs were...
Clockwise from top: The wrecked Dodge wagon; the estate’s gates were damaged in the crash—but, tellingly, Tirella’s legs were not; the New York Daily News reported that Newport police withheld information. Background: the mansion’s gates.CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS, OCTOBER 10, 1966, BY ED QUIGLEY/COURTESY OF JOHN QUIGLEY, BY JERRY TAYLOR/COURTESY OF MARK TAYLOR.

Edward Angel had been a rookie patrolman assigned to “The Avenue” beat, along mansion row. On October 7, he’d just gone on duty at 5 p.m. Within minutes, the radio in his patrol unit crackled with word of an accident. He hit the roof lights and sped to the scene. “There was a woman inside the vehicle,” he says. “She was extremely upset. I looked down and found someone underneath the car, all rolled up. I was inexperienced and young, so I blurted out, ‘He’s under the car.’ That sent her into shock. She jumped out and, thank God, there was a young Navy nurse there”—Judith Thom Wartgow—“and I asked if she could help her. I was focused on whoever was under the vehicle, whether he was still alive.”

A short while later, after Tirella’s mangled frame was extricated, Angel pulled out a pad to make a sketch of the scene. “I walked into the middle of Bellevue [Avenue], looked down, and I saw some skin and blood,” he says. “I drew a diagram of what I thought had been the point of impact between the subject and the vehicle—where I thought he’d been run over.” In Angel’s drawing, the impact—based on the blood and human remains he’d found—occurred not at the gate but out in the street.

Unclear as to who Tirella was—or his relation to the woman he now realized was Doris Duke—Patrolman Angel’s first thought was that she’d hit a pedestrian crossing the avenue. “I submitted my findings,” he recounts, “and the next day, I got called in by Sergeant Newton. He took me back up to the scene and showed me markings on the gates that suggested somebody had been forced up on the hood of the car. Then he walked me into the middle of Bellevue, explaining that the blood and the skin I’d found were from when the victim rolled off and fell in front of the car.”

According to Angel, Fred Newton believed that Tirella went up on the hood of the wagon before it hit the gate. “That was his theory of the crash,” he says. “Then at some point after the gates blew open, she hesitated, tapped the brakes and he rolled off. At that point he was run over by the vehicle and dragged to the point where he was still underneath it when it hit the tree.” That would account for why the lower gates were pulverized but Tirella’s legs were undamaged.

If Newton was correct, Doris Duke had killed Tirella with intent. In fact, according to the cumulative evidence, she engaged in four voluntary acts before she hit him. First, she slid behind the wheel. Next, she released the parking brake by hand. She then moved the shift lever from park to drive. Finally, she hit the accelerator. The wagon surged forward and struck Tirella, who went up on the hood. But instead of “crushing” him against the gates, as Chief Radice had claimed, Tirella remained on the hood, alive, as the Dodge blew through the gates and roared onto Bellevue Avenue. At that point, according to what Sergeant Newton told Patrolman Angel, Tirella rolled off the hood, and she ran him over. In fact, in the official police report, Newton wrote that “tire marks…indicated” that Duke had “steered” the vehicle, which moved “with tremendous…acceleration.”

The deep, parallel, tire-wide gouge marks that Robert Aughey had photographed from 30 feet back support Newton’s sequence of events. The ’66 Dodge Polara was 18 feet long. The rear tires were three feet from the back bumper, so the math would have been right: the front bumper 15 feet from the gate—the tire gouges in the gravel 15 feet back from there. The distance from the gates to the tree was just under 80 feet.

Edward Friedman, the attorney for the Tirella family, had stated at trial that “Tirella was dragged about 40 feet and was pinned beneath the car when it stopped.” In other words, he was dragged from the middle of Bellevue Avenue—the very point where Angel had first noticed the blood and the skin. In the Quigley photo that depicts Newton at the gate, no residue of blood or remains is visible between the gate stop and the middle of the street. But another shot by Quigley, taken from under the Dodge, shows what looks like a large bloodstain

 

Curiously, it was the negative of that very photo (shown at the beginning of this story) that went missing from the Newport Daily News archives at the historical society. And yet John Quigley’s wife, Jane, found a print, made in 1966. What’s more, Robert Aughey Jr. recalls that the morning after the crash he noticed a sticky substance near where his uncle’s body had come to rest. “I remember kneeling down and putting my fingers in it,” he says. “Lifting them up, they were bright red with blood.”

Newport police detective Al Conti, a retired 28-year veteran of many investigations along Bellevue Avenue, believes Fred Newton’s theory of the crash to be entirely plausible. “If it was me that night and I heard her coming and I’m facing the car,” he told me, “my first instinct would be to jump up on the hood. What happened to Mr. Tirella was outrageous, no matter what the cause, but to think that he might have seen his own death coming”—facing Duke from the other side of the windshield—“is an awful prospect to consider.”

I submitted all of this evidence to Harm Jansen, a senior staff engineer with Collision and Injury Dynamics, one of the nation’s top forensic consulting firms. This is his conclusion: “Based on my analysis of Sergeant Newton’s own diagrams in the police report, it’s clear that Doris Duke was on the accelerator for at least three seconds before the vehicle went through the gates. There is no evidence that Mr. Tirella was pinned against them. It’s clear that he went up on the hood, fell off, and got run over, mid-street. This was a multi-sequence event in which the driver made a number of affirmative decisions in the course of the incident. The analysis of his injuries, limited to upper body, the head-on damage to the lower sections of the gates, the account of Edward Angel, the first officer on the scene, and the contemporaneous investigation by the senior police accident investigator, Sergeant Newton, lead me to conclude that the event did not occur as described by Doris Duke.”

For months after Eddie’s death, according to Tirella’s niece Donna Lohmeyer, Doris Duke would call her mother (Tirella’s sister) late at night and weep with her over the phone. As Lohmeyer remembers, “Mom said Doris told her she kept a picture of him in a sterling silver frame next to her bed in every one of her estates.” But no such photo was on display in Duke’s bedroom at Rough Point when I recently visited there on the 52nd anniversary of Eduardo’s death.

In fact, in the 20 years that the estate has been open as a museum, Eduardo Tirella’s name was left out of the Duke narrative. Then in April 2019, after word circulated in Newport about this Vanity Fair investigation, a display was added to one wall in a rotating exhibition space. Its title: “The Accident at the Rough Point Gate.” The text reiterated the official police explanation of Tirella’s death, and, in an accompanying video, Rough Point’s curator called any suggestions to the contrary “a local myth.”

But if one takes a closer look at the interior of Rough Point, there is another connection to Tirella worth noting. Within weeks of his funeral, Duke took possession of the Saint Ursula reliquary—the artifact she’d asked him to appraise the evening she killed him. Eventually, Duke positioned it on a table in the main hall at the foot of the mansion’s large staircase. Every evening thereafter, when she went up to bed, that statue was there to remind her of “that horrible night.”

After Duke died, the old staff remembered how she had referred to that piece not as Saint Ursula, but Saint Cecilia, patron saint of music, whose feast day was November 22. That happened to be Doris Duke’s own birthday. In the end, this narcissistic woman—with enough money and power to view the world entirely through her own distorted lens—had even managed to recast that last work of art into her own image.

******I here cease to quote from the fascinating work today of Mr Peter Lance for The Vanity Fair Magazine*****

IN THE NAME OF GOD.
AMEN
Praying Hands Personalized Prayer Card (Priced Per Card)
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Index Librorum Prohibitorum
I wear the chain I forged in life.
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How short the list one could compile of those of whom it can be said that fame and money did not deprave?

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IL MIGLIOR FABBRO

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 At Washington, capital city of the terminally self-absorbed, mortal man holds to fleeting, feeble and fallible opinion, God immutable fact.

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      • It is my assessment that America is dying inside, being eaten away by the horror of the collapse of the middle orders, the attendant societal and religious values and customs of those orders and the ubiquity of war making for dubious purpose.
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      • The rich man ought not be taxed at all~~he ought be compelled to employ and train the poor man~~directly~~personally.

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      The principal need in America today is~~financial and industrial De-Globalization~~to facilitate the promotion of the possibility for the average man to get and keep a good job with good benefits paid by the employer~~as was done not very long ago.
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      ~~Bene Nati, Bene Vestiti, Et Mediocriter Docti~~
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      ~~La crema y nata~~

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      ~~Artista de la conquista

      ~~

      In sunshine and in shadow~~I hold tight to the Republican view of time and money~~I write night and day~~yet~~while impecunious~~I am vastly overpaid~~in that taking pay to do what I love is unfair~~to my employer~~in a fair system~~under such circumstances~~I should pay him~~not he me~~I am far, far too old a man to be sexually confused~~praise Jesus~~but I am yet young enough to be politically confused~~is anyone not~~in an absolute sense~~I am a Catholic Royalist~~in a practical sense~~I am a Classical Liberal~~a Gaullist~~a Bonapartist~~an American Nationalist  Republican~~in either sense~~my head is soon for the chopping block~~to hasten my interlude with Madame La Guillotine~~I write without fear~and without favor of~any man.

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      • At Washington, capital city of the terminally self-absorbed, mortal man holds to fleeting, feeble and fallible opinion, God immutable fact.
          • ~~
          • It is my assessment that America is dying inside, being eaten away by the horror of the collapse of the middle orders, the attendant societal and religious values and customs of those orders and the ubiquity of war making for dubious purpose.
          • ~~
          • The rich man ought not be taxed at all~~he ought be compelled to employ and train the poor man~~directly~~personally.

          ~~

          The principal need in America today is~~financial and industrial De-Globalization~~to facilitate the promotion of the possibility for the average man to get and keep a good job with good benefits paid by the employer~~as was done not very long ago.~~
          clip_image002MA9982782-0001

          CIRE PERDUE~

          ~~Bene Nati, Bene Vestiti, Et Mediocriter Docti~~
          ~

          ~~La crema y nata~~

          ~

          ~~Artista de la conquista

          ~~

          In sunshine and in shadow~~I hold tight to the Republican view of time and money~~I write night and day~~yet~~while impecunious~~I am vastly overpaid~~in that taking pay to do what I love is unfair~~to my employer~~in a fair system~~under such circumstances~~I should pay him~~not he me~~I am far, far too old a man to be sexually confused~~praise Jesus~~but I am yet young enough to be politically confused~~is anyone not~~in an absolute sense~~I am a Catholic Royalist~~in a practical sense~~I am a Classical Liberal~~a Gaullist~~a Bonapartist~~an American Nationalist  Republican~~in either sense~~my head is soon for the chopping block~~to hasten my interlude with Madame La Guillotine~~I write without fear~and without favor of~any man.
          ~~
          Finis Origine Pendet…
          The escape commences…
          ~~
          September, 1957
          ~~
          Saint Jane Frances de Chantal Catholic parochial school, called, by anyone of any background, simply: “Chan~al,” a place where, of an autumn day in 1957, school,  for me,  began and ended in the first convening of the first grade in which a tiny nun, one Sister Dom Bosco, appeared before me, just behind the window appearing at far left of this photograph, and piped out this: “I may be small, but so then, is the Atom Bomb.”
          ~~
          My determination to escape school commenced immediately on hearing about this Atom Bomb business and took 16 dicey and arduous years to finally accomplish.~~
          ~~
          Non Sibi
          The declaration that:
          “I am here to save mankind,” means that:
          “I am here to rule mankind.”
          50574a838cafa7db2d6ff9751819c753
          The escape continues…
          ~~
          September, 1966
          ~~
          The Cathedral Latin School
          ~~
           Finis Origine Pendet
          ~~
          Κύριε ἐλέησον
          ~~

          Rejoice and Glad!!

          ~~

          Amen~~

          CUA_Cardinal_2008

          ~The Original Angry Bird~~The Catholic University of America Screaming Red Cardinal Mascot~~
          clip_image002MA9982782-0001
          ~~EX LIBRIS~~
          ~~
          THEOS EK MĒCHANĒS
          ~~
          19th Juin, Friday,  Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi, the 2020th
          
          Website: http://johndanielbegg.wordpress.com

          http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=122865699&trk=tab_pro

          http://www.facebook.com/JohnDanielBeggPublicAffairs
          http://www.tumblr.com/blog/theoldsoldiershome1952

          http://www.facebook.com/john.begg.33

          http://www.pinterest.com/johnbegg33/boards/

          http://independent.academia.edu/johnbegg/Papers?s=nav#add

          http://www.stumbleupon.com/stumbler/jtdbegg

          Tweets: @jtdbegg

          http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=122865699&trk=hb_tab_pro_top
          
          
          
          
          “Jean-Marie Le Pen is a friend. He is dangerous for the political set because he’s the only one who’s sincere. He says out loud what many people think deep down, and what the politicians refrain from saying because they are either too demagogic or too chicken. Le Pen, with all his faults and qualities, is probably the only one who thinks about the interests of France before his own.”~~
          Alain Delon~~Actor
          
          
          
          $T2eC16J,!)sE9swm(wv0BRPCJh43uQ~~60_57

          John Daniel Begg raises cotton.

          ~~

          In the Old South, the real Southland, we had a charming expression, when asked what an idle man did for a living:

          ~~

          “Oh, he raises cotton.”
          ~~
        • Which meant, he did absolutely nothing at all, as cotton,  “the white gold,” raises herself.

           

        • 11900068_728996890560925_4010112541193348700_n
        • Catholic and Royal Army - Wikipedia
          CONCEPT OF THE CATHOLIC AND ROYAL ARMY OF AMERICA (CRAA)

           

          THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA
          Logo of The Catholic University of America.svg
          Seal of The Catholic University of America

          Motto:

          ~~

          Deus Lux Mea Est

          ~~

          Acta Est Fabula

          The escape concludes…

          The Catholic University Of America, Washington, The Federal District of Columbia.

          Student walking across campus toward McMahon Hall

          1976, Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi.

          “Who first seduc'd them to that foul revolt?
          Th' infernal Serpent; he it was, whose guile
          Stird up with Envy and Revenge, deceiv'd
          The Mother of All Mankind"
          ~~
          Paradise Lost
          Book One
           Verse 35
           Our Mr Milton
          
           https://johndanielbegg.com/2016/03/09/the-infernal-serpent-he-it-was-whose-guile--stirred-up-with-envy-and-revenge-deceived-the-mother-of-mankind
          10325217_484127205047896_7255341654839362288_n.jpgbegg2
          How short the list one could compile of those of whom it can be said that fame and money did not deprave? 

          Acta Est Fabula.

          ~~

          Deus Vult.

          image002 (20)

      Ne plus ultra

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      Our Ubiquitous Presence

      ~~

      Our Queen

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      Image result for photos of truman and princess elizabeth

      Our Queen now 68 years on

      ~~

      Simply the best President we could ever hope to have.

      Queen Elizabeth II Through the Years - Photos of Queen Elizabeth II

      Regina ~ Fortuna Imperatrix Mundi

       

      May, 1963– Steve McQueen tooling around LA in his Jaguar XK-SS. — Photograph by © John Dominis/ Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images. Local legend holds that at least one L.A. law-enforcement agency had promised its officers that an “expensive steak dinner” awaited the guy who could nail McQueen and the Jag with a speeding ticket. The tale continues that, while he was spotted often and even pursued a time or two, he was never caught and never written. The steak dinner went unclaimed. Another story refutes the entire affair, alleging that McQueen was so awash in speeding tickets he nearly lost his license.

      May, 1963– Steve McQueen driving his Jaguar XK-SS down Sunset Blvd, Hollywood, California. — Photograph by © John Dominis/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

 

The Rainbow Sign

Noah's Flood – Foreshadowing Baptism (With images) | Noahs ark ...

37 Best James Baldwin Photos images | James baldwin, Baldwin ...
No fire, no flood today, Jimmie:
Letter from a Region in My Mind, by James Baldwin | The New Yorker
Jimmie wrote one readable book–The Fire Next Time–derivative of ‘The new Flood–‘God said to Abraham–I’ll show you a sign–No more water, the fire next time,” but then became lost both in himself–he tried to be a two penny philosopher and failed–and externally–he was very sad and could not adjust to being either Negroe or homosexual.
He was a lost boy who forgot he was supposed to be a writer.
So, we’ll never know if he was or no.
How should we interpret the Genesis flood account? - Common ...
****We thank the The New Yorker Magazine for their note today on Jimmie and recognize their good work****

The History That James Baldwin Wanted America To See

For Baldwin, the past had always been bent in service of a lie. Could a true story be told?
Illustration of MLK Baldwin and protestors toppling over a statue.
As both James Baldwin and Martin Luther King, Jr., insisted, America is an identity that white people will protect at any cost, and the country’s history—its founding documents, its national heroes—is the supporting argument that underpins that identity.

Illustration by Pola ManeliThe fire this time – the legacy of James Baldwin | Books | The ...

On March 16, 1968, James Baldwin walked to the podium at a fund-raiser, at Anaheim’s Disneyland Hotel, to introduce Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Baldwin had recently arrived in Los Angeles from New York, after Columbia Pictures had bought the rights to Alex Haley’s “The Autobiography of Malcolm X” and asked Baldwin to write the script. Though eager, he had ended up fighting desperately to bring his story of Malcolm to the screen. Baldwin wanted Billy Dee Williams to play the lead, but the studio had other actors in mind. There were even rumors that someone had suggested a darkened Charlton Heston.

The fund-raiser was meant to replenish the coffers of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (S.C.L.C.) and to help fund King’s latest project, the Poor People’s Campaign. King wanted to make the case for massive direct action, in Washington, D.C., on behalf of the country’s impoverished. To do so, he would need to marshal greater financial resources than ever before. Desegregating lunch counters didn’t cost much, but ending poverty would cost the nation billions of dollars.

King found that many who once supported his desegregation efforts were less than enthusiastic about his agenda on jobs and poverty. The idea of occupying the nation’s capital with poor people scared many activists—even some on the board of the S.C.L.C. For others, such as Bayard Rustin, a trusted adviser to King since the days of the Montgomery bus boycott, such an act of civil disobedience courted violence and threatened to turn even more white Americans against the civil-rights agenda. Rustin wanted the S.C.L.C. to focus on electing Democrats to political office, not on building a tent city or staging sit-ins at congressional offices.

How Baldwin ended up at the fund-raiser is unclear, although Marlon Brando, who organized it, may have invited him; the two were close. In any case, Baldwin had not been expecting to introduce King, and his short speech said little about the leader. Instead, he told a brief story about the promise of the early days of the civil-rights movement, a promise that was betrayed by the country. “What Rosa Parks was saying in Montgomery, in 1956, and what the Negroes were saying in their march . . . the country did not want to hear or did not hear,” Baldwin told the audience. “And as time rolled on and kids, including people like Stokely Carmichael, were being beaten with chains, going to jail, marching up and down those dusty highways, trying to change the conscience of this country, still nobody heard and nobody really cared.” Baldwin’s speech was all about the wall of white supremacy that stood in the way of fundamental transformation. His was an effort to jog the memory and, by extension, the morality of the audience, by telling a different story about what happened to a movement on the brink of failure.

When King reached the podium, he did not acknowledge Baldwin specifically, and instead offered a generic thanks to all those who had spoken before him. It was only later that the two men conferred privately. “We sat down in a relatively secluded corner and tried to bring each other up to date. Alas, it would never be possible. . . .” Baldwin recalled in his book “No Name in the Street,” from 1972. “We had first met during the last days of the Montgomery bus boycott—and how long ago was that? It was senseless to say, eight years, ten years ago—it was longer ago than time can reckon.”

Baldwin’s general sense of the encounter was that King was a bit skeptical of him. Although Baldwin had known King since his first trip to the South, in 1957, and had worked beside him over the years, he felt that King was discomfited by his presence. “Martin and I had never got to know each other well,” he wrote. “Circumstances, if not temperament, made that impossible.” In 1963, King was caught on tape, by the F.B.I., expressing concern about Baldwin. He didn’t want to appear on television with the writer, he said, because Baldwin “was uninformed regarding his movement.” To King, Baldwin was not a civil-rights leader; he was just one celebrity, among many, willing to lend his star power to the movement. It’s not impossible to imagine, too, that Baldwin’s queerness unsettled him.

By the time of the fund-raiser, the distance between the two men had been widened by Baldwin’s sympathies for the militancy of the younger generation. He was in Hollywood, after all, writing a screenplay on Malcolm X. And, just a month earlier, Baldwin had hosted a birthday party and fund-raiser for Huey P. Newton, the jailed leader of the Black Panther Party. In 1968, King felt intense pressure from such radical groups, and from recent shifts in the political climate. The nation had seemed to turn its back on his moral vision. Writing in The New York Review of Books, Andrew Kopkind, a white journalist of the New Left, declared that King had been “outstripped by his times.” A young black woman, who supported Carmichael’s Black Power philosophy, had even accused King of selling out the Selma movement, as he and other members of the S.C.L.C. board arrived for a meeting in Washington, D.C.

Baldwin had long seen this turn against King on the horizon. In 1961, he had written an article for Harper’s Magazine titled “The Dangerous Road Before Martin Luther King.” In it, he noted how King’s voice had changed from the heady days of the bus boycott, and detailed the challenges that King was destined to face as a black leader in a revolutionary time. “He was more beleaguered than he had ever been before, and not only by his enemies in the white South,” Baldwin wrote. “Three years earlier, I had not encountered very many people—I am speaking now of Negroes—who were really critical of him. But many more people seemed critical of him now, were bitter, disappointed, skeptical.”

Baldwin argued that King had to confront the meaning of a new, uncompromising spirit in the movement. Leaders like him were being challenged by their children, who rejected the underlying premise that made “the traditional black leader” necessary in the first place. As Baldwin put it, “These young people have never believed in the American image of the Negro and have never bargained with the Republic, and now they never will. There is no longer any basis on which to bargain.”

Even in 1961, Baldwin had sensed that these young people might have a point. By 1968, when he gave his speech in Anaheim, he saw clearly how the passage of the Civil Rights and Voting Rights Acts, a few years earlier, might offer white America the sense of self-congratulation that Black Power was now denying it. He knew that the civil-rights movement could easily be conscripted into the story of how Americans, in their inherent goodness, had perfected the Union. The history being made could be bent in service of the lie. For Baldwin, that lie had to be challenged at its root—which is why, perhaps, he devoted his introduction to telling a true story of the movement.

Surprisingly, after Baldwin had finished speaking, King gave a speech that echoed Baldwin’s account. It wasn’t a story of American triumphalism. Instead, King expressed concern that the movement was losing the battle for the soul of the nation. He conjured, without a hint of nostalgia, a history of people acting heroically against the odds, a history full of disappointment and trauma. He did not mince words: America was a decidedly racist country. “The problem can only be solved when there is a kind of coalition of conscience,” he said. “Now I am not sure if we have that many consciences left. Too many have gone to sleep.”

 

Like Baldwin, King struggled with America’s commitment to the belief that white people mattered more, and to the lie that made that belief palatable. “I must honestly confess that I go through those moments of disappointment when I have to recognize the fact that there aren’t enough white persons in our country who are willing to cherish democratic principles over privilege,” he said. “But I’m grateful to God that some are left.” As King brought his speech to a close, he tried, once more, to reach for the promise of America, vowing that the country would one day move forward because, “however much she strays away from it, the goal of America is freedom.” His sombre tone betrayed his words.

The importance of history had been in full view for both Baldwin and King just a few weeks earlier, at a Carnegie Hall event, in New York City, celebrating what would have been the hundredth birthday of W. E. B. Du Bois, the great African-American intellectual and the co-founder of the N.A.A.C.P. Du Bois, after seven decades of fighting for racial justice in the United States, had given up on America and died, in exile, in Accra, Ghana, on the eve of the March on Washington, in 1963. Although Baldwin had been working on an essay about Du Bois, he chose the occasion at Carnegie Hall to read a recently published piece, “Black Power.” Here, at this celebration of Du Bois, who dedicated his life to exposing America’s lies, Baldwin sought to shift the balance of concern from criticism of militancy among young black people to an honest assessment of the conditions that made such a turn necessary.

King disagreed with the rhetoric and symbolism of Black Power. He found no use for what he called a “mystique of blackness” or “the angry militant who fails to organize.” But he, too, was a student of Du Bois’s work, and he understood what Du Bois taught regarding “our tasks of emancipation.” “One idea he insistently taught,” King said in his speech at the event, “was that black people have been kept in oppression and deprivation by a poisonous fog of lies that depicted them as inferior, born deficient, and deservedly doomed to servitude to the grave.”

King’s remarks at Carnegie Hall, like his remarks in Anaheim, were shadowed by a note of despair. The country was in turmoil. “Negroes have heavy tasks today,” he said. “We were partially liberated and then reënslaved.” Although black people had been fighting for freedom “for more than a hundred years,” the only thing that was “explicitly certain is that the struggle for it will endure.”

Baldwin and King would be together one last time, at a fund-raiser in New York City. Baldwin didn’t have a suit for the occasion, so he ran out to have one fitted. Later, he returned to California to work on the Malcolm X film, the direction of which he was still debating with studio executives. On the night of April 4, 1968, Baldwin was sitting by his swimming pool with Billy Dee Williams, listening to an Aretha Franklin record, when the phone rang. It was his friend David Moses. “Jimmy,” Moses said. “Martin’s just been shot. He’s not dead yet, but it’s a head wound, so . . .” Baldwin dropped the phone and wept. A few days later, he wore his new suit to King’s funeral.

Baldwin was hardly naïve about the human capacity for evil, especially in white folk. “If you’re a Negro, you’re in the center of that peculiar affliction,” he said, “because anybody can touch you—when the sun goes down. You know, you’re the target of everybody’s fantasies.” But what shocked him was that white America had killed someone who espoused love, an apostle of nonviolence. King’s death revealed the depths of white America’s debasement and the scope of black America’s peril. “Perhaps even more than the death itself, the manner of his death has forced me into a judgment concerning human life and human beings which I have always been reluctant to make,” he wrote. “Incontestably, alas, most people are not, in action, worth very much; and yet, every human being is an unprecedented miracle. One tries to treat them as the miracles they are, while trying to protect oneself against the disasters they’ve become.”

If King was the preacher, Baldwin was the poet, and he sought to account for his confusion by gathering up the pieces—of himself, of black folk—buried beneath the disaster that was the country. That work kept his despair at arm’s length. To be sure, King’s death, just like those of Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and all the others, did not stop time. White people did not stop being white people. Two days after King’s murder, the Black Panther Bobby Hutton was killed by Oakland police officers. Later, police rioted in Chicago, during the Democratic National Convention. The nastiness of the white world kept coming, and it gave black politics—and Baldwin’s voice—an edge. King’s death had revealed the bitterness at the bottom of the cup. What Baldwin saw on that dangerous road that led to King’s death, in Memphis, was the difficult question of whether or not the country had the courage to confront its demons. Could America tell itself the truth about how it had arrived at this moment? And did it have the moral stamina to surrender the comfort of its lies?

In July of 1968, just a few months after King’s assassination and against the backdrop of American cities burning, Baldwin gave an interview to Esquire. He set the tone of the exchange from the very start:

Q. How can we get the black people to cool it?

A. It is not for us to cool it.

Q. But aren’t you the ones who are getting hurt the most?

A. No, we are only the ones who are dying fastest.

The editors did not seem to grasp how the moral burden of America’s nightmare rested not on the black people rioting in the streets but on the white people who held tightly to the belief that they were somehow, because of the color of their skin, better than others. These people, Baldwin argued, had to see themselves otherwise. New laws, gestures of sympathy, and acts of racial charity would never suffice to change the course of the country. Something more radical had to be done; a different history had to be told. “All that can save you now is your confrontation with your own history . . . which is not your past, but your present,” Baldwin said. “Your history has led you to this moment, and you can only begin to change yourself by looking at what you are doing in the name of your history.”

On August 12, 2017, James Fields, Jr., a twenty-year-old self-proclaimed neo-Nazi from Kenton, Kentucky, floored the gas pedal of his 2010 Dodge Challenger and roared down a narrow street full of anti-racist protesters, during the “Unite the Right” rally, in Charlottesville, Virginia. Heather Heyer, who was raised in nearby Ruckersville, was in the crowd. According to people who knew her, Heyer, thirty-two, had spent much of her life “standing up against any type of discrimination.” As Fields’s speeding car sent shoes, cell phones, and bodies flying into the air, Ryan Kelly, a photographer for the Daily Progress, captured the carnage. Heyer is framed between a man falling behind the car’s back bumper, one Air Jordan-clad foot twisted horribly in the air, and the tattooed torso of a white man in mid-somersault. She is leaning to the side as the muscle car hits her and plows through the crowd. Heyer died at the scene, and dozens more were injured. Fields was eventually convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison.

The occasion of this violence was a bitter battle over American history and how we ought to remember it. In March, 2016, Wes Bellamy, Charlottesville’s vice-mayor and a member of its city council, advocated for the removal of Confederate monuments to Robert E. Lee and Thomas (Stonewall) Jackson. Zyahna Bryant, a high-school freshman in Charlottesville, joined Bellamy’s effort. She circulated a petition demanding the removal of the Robert E. Lee statue in a local park and submitted it to the council. The council agreed to remove the statue by a vote of three to two.

Then, in 2017, all hell broke loose. Emboldened by the election of Donald Trump, who had often and overtly appealed to white identity, local white nationalists saw an opportunity to exploit the council’s decision. The nationalists believed that the actions of the council were an assault on white people. In their view, the soldiers of political correctness had disfigured and distorted American history, in general, and Southern history, in particular. Their outrage prompted the “Unite the Right” rally, the largest gathering of white nationalists and neo-Nazis in recent memory. That day ended with Fields’s murderous drive on Fourth Street.

It is telling that such brutality broke out over a fight regarding the symbols and uses of American history. As both Baldwin and King insisted, each in their own way, America is an identity that white people will protect at any cost, and the country’s history—its founding documents, its national heroes, its claim to be a moral force in the world—is the supporting argument that underpins that identity. This history is inseparable from the nation’s built environment; both monuments and the ways in which communities are spatially organized reinforce it. When King declared that the country’s moral vision had been clouded by “a poisonous fog of lies,” and when Baldwin said in Esquire that we needed to look at what we are doing in the name of our history, both were arguing that this history, the story we tell ourselves about what the country is, shapes the world we make going forward.

The debate over Confederate monuments makes this plain. For white nationalists, the Confederacy represents a triumph of a certain understanding of America, in which the superiority of white people in all social, political, and cultural arrangements is enshrined. From that perspective, open-air tributes to white supremacy make sense. The more complex question is what we do with those who are willing to condemn neo-Nazis but who still claim Confederate statues as part of their “heritage.” These are the people for whom Judge Richard E. Moore, of the Charlottesville Circuit Court, ruled, in April, 2019, that the Confederate statues must remain in the area. “While some people obviously see Lee and Jackson as symbols of white supremacy, others see them as brilliant military tacticians or complex leaders in a difficult time,” Moore wrote in his decision.

Moore was presenting a different narrative about the statues. After Charlottesville, though, American historians made clear that the monuments were not, in fact, erected as contemporaneous memorials of the Civil War. Most were built many years later, either between the eighteen-nineties and the first decades of the twentieth century, when most of the Confederate veterans began to die, or in the nineteen-fifties, when the demand for racial equality intensified. They were, in other words, monuments to an ideology, physical representations of the “Lost Cause” in public space. They insisted on the false claim that the Civil War centered not on slavery but on the heroic defense of the Southern way of life.

Black people challenged these monuments even as they were being built. In “Black Reconstruction in America,” from 1935, Du Bois exposed the lies at the heart of that era’s historiography, unmasking the influential works of the political scientist John W. Burgess and the historian William A. Dunning. The Dunning School, the first generation of trained historians to write about Reconstruction, told the story of the period as one of extensive overreach of federal power and the corruption of northern carpetbaggers; Dunning viewed the granting of political rights to former slaves as a monstrous mistake. Du Bois cast scorn on this attempt to write history as “pleasant reading for Americans.” For him, the Confederate statues represented the triumph of Dunning’s sensibility. The history that justified their construction banished, once and for all, the horrors of slavery, and left American identity safe and secure.

Nearly a century later, we are still trying to transcend such “pleasant reading.” Three days after the display of white supremacy in Charlottesville, the President held an infamous press conference in Trump Tower. He blamed “both sides” for the violence, and went on to flatly reject the idea of removing Confederate statues, employing a not-so-deft piece of moral relativism: “George Washington was a slave owner. . . . So will George Washington lose his statues? . . . How about Thomas Jefferson? . . . He was a major slave owner.” For Trump, celebration of the Confederacy—a region that committed treason to defend the institution of slavery—was American history. By playing on the knowledge that Washington and Jefferson were, to most Americans, unimpeachable, he sought to suggest that there was an argument for Lee, too, and to imply that taking down statues of the general was a slippery slope which would somehow unravel our most basic assumptions about America. His then chief of staff, General John Kelly, agreed, giving an interview, on Fox News, in which he said that protests of the statues showed “a lack of appreciation of history, and what history is.”

Trump’s and Kelly’s understanding of history is precisely what Baldwin critiqued in 1968. But Baldwin also insisted that such lies might enable us, if we’re honest, to tell the story of America differently. Trump, for all his bluster, asked a necessary question: What do we do with George Washington? For the President, this question was simplistic, binary: Do Washington’s statues stay up or come down? But that’s not how history works. We might ask, instead, what the story of slavery and Reconstruction—or of Washington and Jefferson—looks like when it neither glosses over the cruelty of this country nor rejects its potential for betterment.

Something like this question confronted the community of Princeton University, where I teach, in November, 2015. That month, the Black Justice League, a student activist organization on campus, staged a thirty-three-hour sit-in at the president’s office. The action was part of a national student movement in support of anti-racism protests at the University of Missouri. In one of the Black Justice League’s many demands, the students requested that the administration “publicly acknowledge the racist legacy of Woodrow Wilson,” rename the Wilson residential college and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, and remove a mural of Wilson in one of the school’s dining halls.

This demand cut to the heart of Princeton’s self-understanding. Wilson was the president of the university from 1902 to 1910; much of what the school is, as a serious institution of higher learning, has been attributed to him. But the students wanted the university to complicate the story it told itself about Wilson, to acknowledge what his racist legacy meant to its black students, and to consider how that legacy, represented in public space, devalued them. There was indignity, they argued, in sleeping or eating in a building named after someone who thought you an inferior human being.

Spurred by the students’ protest, Princeton’s president, Christopher Eisgruber, and the school’s board of trustees established a committee to reëxamine the ways in which the university commemorated Wilson. Scholars, biographers, and members of the school community were invited to contribute to the conversation. Nell Painter, an emerita professor and the author of “The History of White People,” spoke to the heart of the matter. “It’s all about the questions we ask,” she said. “The questions have changed. I mean, the questions always change. That’s why we keep writing history.”

In the end, Princeton chose not to remove Wilson’s name from the buildings, but it did agree to deepen its story of Wilson. Signage around campus and within dormitories now gives a fuller sense of Wilson’s segregationist views, and of Princeton’s exclusionary history. The school also agreed to diversify representation across the campus. One of the administration’s most important decisions was to rename West College, which houses the dean of the college and the undergraduate admissions office, after Toni Morrison, who taught for many years at the university.

The issue is far from resolved. Black students at Princeton aren’t interlopers. They are not guests on campus or beneficiaries of charity who should be grateful to the school. They are, unlike in Wilson’s day, an integral part of the community. And, like all students on campus, they should feel a sense of possession of the university. Much more work needs to be done, but their protest brilliantly forced the university to reassess its past in the full light of its current values.

Their protest might also help us think about Trump’s and Kelly’s view of “what history is.” As a first principle, history cannot be equated with comfort, nostalgia, or a fixed arc of progress. We need to get the facts right; otherwise, we are trading only in what Du Bois called “lies agreed upon.” In particular, we can’t elide the facts that complicate how we might see a historical figure or event. Washington held slaves, and he didn’t treat them very well. Jefferson wrote brilliantly about democracy, and he also owned slaves, exploited Sally Hemings, the enslaved mother of his children, and wondered aloud if black people were biologically inferior. The record shows this to be true.

And yet the facts alone aren’t enough. What we do with them, the kinds of questions we ask about them, and for what ends, matter. For some, the fact that Washington and Jefferson owned slaves disqualifies them as moral exemplars. For others, the men may have been wrong in owning slaves, but that fact stands alongside other, more admirable aspects of their lives. William Dunning’s interpretation of Reconstruction was different from Du Bois’s. Each of these interpretations reveals something about what is valued, and about how the past as told speaks to the present. Our appeals to history can never be entirely objective; they aim, just as often, to clarify our commitments today.

This is why, in moments of revolution or profound cultural shifts, one of the first things that people remove are symbols of old values. Many of Lenin’s and Stalin’s statues, for example, had to fall. Since the murder of George Floyd, in May, by a white police officer, Confederate monuments across the country have been either toppled or removed. But it’s telling that Robert E. Lee continues to stand tall in Charlottesville, where Heyer died. We have the facts straight, and know what values Lee represented, but there remains, no matter the protests, disagreement on what story should be told. As Baldwin put it, in “No Name in the Street,” “One may see that the history, which is now indivisible from oneself, has been full of errors and excesses; but this is not the same thing as seeing that, for millions of people, this history . . . has been nothing but an intolerable yoke, a stinking prison, a shrieking grave.” If white people in America choose to accept the lie, Baldwin argued, others would never be free to reject it. And rejecting the lie was, for him, the precondition to progress.

This is not an easy conclusion to accept. One of the unique features of American nationalism is how closely interwoven the idea of America is with the identity of the white people who live in it. For those who cling to this idea, the fear is that admitting the evils of slavery, or the continued harms of oppression, will make the idea of America—and they themselves—irredeemable. They would rather find safety in the lie. But if the condition of our love for country is a lie then the love itself, no matter how genuine, is a lie. The idea may be irredeemable. That does not mean we are, too.

In August, 1965, Baldwin published an essay in Ebony called “The White Man’s Guilt.” It had been a difficult year. Malcolm X was assassinated in February. In March, the world witnessed the brutality of Alabama state troopers attacking protesters on the Edmund Pettus Bridge, in Selma. And, on August 11th, the Watts riots exploded across Los Angeles, largely in response to violence by the police. In his essay, Baldwin demanded a confrontation with a history that white America desperately avoided. “White man, hear me!” he wrote. “History, as nearly no one seems to know, is not merely something to be read. And it does not refer merely, or even principally, to the past. On the contrary, the great force of history comes from the fact that we carry it within us.”

An honest encounter with the past, then, had everything to do with the kinds of people we understood ourselves to be and the kinds of people we aspired to become. Baldwin wanted to free us from the shackles of a particular national story, so that we might create ourselves anew. For this to happen, white America needed to shatter the myths that secured its innocence. “People who imagine that history flatters them,” he wrote, “are impaled on their history like a butterfly on a pin and become incapable of seeing or changing themselves, or the world.” Trump and his followers stand in a long lineage of such people, who use a certain understanding of the past to reinforce the injustices of the present. Baldwin’s vision demanded a reckoning with this understanding—not to posit the greatness of America but to establish the ground upon which that greatness could be built.

In his reflections on King, Baldwin wrote that we were witnessing the death of segregation, and that the question was how long and how expensive the funeral would be. If only he knew. More than fifty years later, we are still marching in the procession and fighting in the streets. A world is dying, but we have been slow to put it in the grave, and the costs are mounting. How many of our loved ones are rotting in prisons and jails? How many are breaking their backs trying to make ends meet? And how many souls have been darkened from the effects of America’s original sin? True freedom, for all Americans, requires that we tell a better story, a true story, about how we arrived here. It is time to bury that old Negro, and the white people who so desperately need him, and to finally begin again.

This essay was drawn from “Begin Again: James Baldwin’s America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own,” which will be published, by Crown, in June.

****We thank the The New Yorker Magazine for their note today on Jimmie and recognize their good work****

IN THE NAME OF GOD.
AMEN
No alt text provided for this image
####################################################################
Index Librorum Prohibitorum
I wear the chain I forged in life.
article-2253237-00BCBB6C00000190-350_634x715

Image may contain: one or more people

How short the list one could compile of those of whom it can be said that fame and money did not deprave?

day3

IL MIGLIOR FABBRO

1147013_363612750432676_183433089_o

Image may contain: 1 person, closeup

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, suit

 At Washington, capital city of the terminally self-absorbed, mortal man holds to fleeting, feeble and fallible opinion, God immutable fact.

      • ~~
      • It is my assessment that America is dying inside, being eaten away by the horror of the collapse of the middle orders, the attendant societal and religious values and customs of those orders and the ubiquity of war making for dubious purpose.
      • ~~
      • The rich man ought not be taxed at all~~he ought be compelled to employ and train the poor man~~directly~~personally.

      ~~

      The principal need in America today is~~financial and industrial De-Globalization~~to facilitate the promotion of the possibility for the average man to get and keep a good job with good benefits paid by the employer~~as was done not very long ago.
      ~~
      ~~Bene Nati, Bene Vestiti, Et Mediocriter Docti~~
      ~

      ~~La crema y nata~~

      ~

      ~~Artista de la conquista

      ~~

      In sunshine and in shadow~~I hold tight to the Republican view of time and money~~I write night and day~~yet~~while impecunious~~I am vastly overpaid~~in that taking pay to do what I love is unfair~~to my employer~~in a fair system~~under such circumstances~~I should pay him~~not he me~~I am far, far too old a man to be sexually confused~~praise Jesus~~but I am yet young enough to be politically confused~~is anyone not~~in an absolute sense~~I am a Catholic Royalist~~in a practical sense~~I am a Classical Liberal~~a Gaullist~~a Bonapartist~~an American Nationalist  Republican~~in either sense~~my head is soon for the chopping block~~to hasten my interlude with Madame La Guillotine~~I write without fear~and without favor of~any man.

      unnamed (1) blue hats 3

      10374522_787949381332342_5064879056003089982_n

      550773_191188294341790_1993333795_n

      • At Washington, capital city of the terminally self-absorbed, mortal man holds to fleeting, feeble and fallible opinion, God immutable fact.
          • ~~
          • It is my assessment that America is dying inside, being eaten away by the horror of the collapse of the middle orders, the attendant societal and religious values and customs of those orders and the ubiquity of war making for dubious purpose.
          • ~~
          • The rich man ought not be taxed at all~~he ought be compelled to employ and train the poor man~~directly~~personally.

          ~~

          The principal need in America today is~~financial and industrial De-Globalization~~to facilitate the promotion of the possibility for the average man to get and keep a good job with good benefits paid by the employer~~as was done not very long ago.~~
          clip_image002MA9982782-0001

          CIRE PERDUE~

          ~~Bene Nati, Bene Vestiti, Et Mediocriter Docti~~
          ~

          ~~La crema y nata~~

          ~

          ~~Artista de la conquista

          ~~

          In sunshine and in shadow~~I hold tight to the Republican view of time and money~~I write night and day~~yet~~while impecunious~~I am vastly overpaid~~in that taking pay to do what I love is unfair~~to my employer~~in a fair system~~under such circumstances~~I should pay him~~not he me~~I am far, far too old a man to be sexually confused~~praise Jesus~~but I am yet young enough to be politically confused~~is anyone not~~in an absolute sense~~I am a Catholic Royalist~~in a practical sense~~I am a Classical Liberal~~a Gaullist~~a Bonapartist~~an American Nationalist  Republican~~in either sense~~my head is soon for the chopping block~~to hasten my interlude with Madame La Guillotine~~I write without fear~and without favor of~any man.
          ~~
          Finis Origine Pendet…
          The escape commences…
          ~~
          September, 1957
          ~~
          Saint Jane Frances de Chantal Catholic parochial school, called, by anyone of any background, simply: “Chan~al,” a place where, of an autumn day in 1957, school,  for me,  began and ended in the first convening of the first grade in which a tiny nun, one Sister Dom Bosco, appeared before me, just behind the window appearing at far left of this photograph, and piped out this: “I may be small, but so then, is the Atom Bomb.”
          ~~
          My determination to escape school commenced immediately on hearing about this Atom Bomb business and took 16 dicey and arduous years to finally accomplish.~~
          ~~
          Non Sibi
          The declaration that:
          “I am here to save mankind,” means that:
          “I am here to rule mankind.”
          50574a838cafa7db2d6ff9751819c753
          The escape continues…
          ~~
          September, 1966
          ~~
          The Cathedral Latin School
          ~~
           Finis Origine Pendet
          ~~
          Κύριε ἐλέησον
          ~~

          Rejoice and Glad!!

          ~~

          Amen~~

          CUA_Cardinal_2008

          ~The Original Angry Bird~~The Catholic University of America Screaming Red Cardinal Mascot~~
          clip_image002MA9982782-0001
          ~~EX LIBRIS~~
          ~~
          THEOS EK MĒCHANĒS
          ~~
          19th Juin, Friday,  Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi, the 2020th
          
          Website: http://johndanielbegg.wordpress.com

          http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=122865699&trk=tab_pro

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          Tweets: @jtdbegg

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          “Jean-Marie Le Pen is a friend. He is dangerous for the political set because he’s the only one who’s sincere. He says out loud what many people think deep down, and what the politicians refrain from saying because they are either too demagogic or too chicken. Le Pen, with all his faults and qualities, is probably the only one who thinks about the interests of France before his own.”~~
          Alain Delon~~Actor
          
          
          
          $T2eC16J,!)sE9swm(wv0BRPCJh43uQ~~60_57

          John Daniel Begg raises cotton.

          ~~

          In the Old South, the real Southland, we had a charming expression, when asked what an idle man did for a living:

          ~~

          “Oh, he raises cotton.”
          ~~
        • Which meant, he did absolutely nothing at all, as cotton,  “the white gold,” raises herself.

           

        • 11900068_728996890560925_4010112541193348700_n
        • Catholic and Royal Army - Wikipedia
          CONCEPT OF THE CATHOLIC AND ROYAL ARMY OF AMERICA (CRAA)

           

          THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA
          Logo of The Catholic University of America.svg
          Seal of The Catholic University of America

          Motto:

          ~~

          Deus Lux Mea Est

          ~~

          Acta Est Fabula

          The escape concludes…

          The Catholic University Of America, Washington, The Federal District of Columbia.

          Student walking across campus toward McMahon Hall

          1976, Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi.

          “Who first seduc'd them to that foul revolt?
          Th' infernal Serpent; he it was, whose guile
          Stird up with Envy and Revenge, deceiv'd
          The Mother of All Mankind"
          ~~
          Paradise Lost
          Book One
           Verse 35
           Our Mr Milton
          
           https://johndanielbegg.com/2016/03/09/the-infernal-serpent-he-it-was-whose-guile--stirred-up-with-envy-and-revenge-deceived-the-mother-of-mankind
          10325217_484127205047896_7255341654839362288_n.jpgbegg2
          How short the list one could compile of those of whom it can be said that fame and money did not deprave? 

          Acta Est Fabula.

          ~~

          Deus Vult.

          image002 (20)

      Ne plus ultra

      be21c107-c314-4fb3-a2e1-1bc2a6375f93

      10273429_475642092563074_3006900326038764208_n

      11825782_910686702310728_7422264639390513425_n

      Image may contain: 2 people, including Ellen Wolentarski Begg156587214Z

      Our Ubiquitous Presence

      ~~

      Our Queen

      queen-elizabeth-herbert-hoover

      Image result for photos of truman and princess elizabeth

      Our Queen now 68 years on

      ~~

      Simply the best President we could ever hope to have.

      Queen Elizabeth II Through the Years - Photos of Queen Elizabeth II

      Regina ~ Fortuna Imperatrix Mundi

       

      May, 1963– Steve McQueen tooling around LA in his Jaguar XK-SS. — Photograph by © John Dominis/ Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images. Local legend holds that at least one L.A. law-enforcement agency had promised its officers that an “expensive steak dinner” awaited the guy who could nail McQueen and the Jag with a speeding ticket. The tale continues that, while he was spotted often and even pursued a time or two, he was never caught and never written. The steak dinner went unclaimed. Another story refutes the entire affair, alleging that McQueen was so awash in speeding tickets he nearly lost his license.

      May, 1963– Steve McQueen driving his Jaguar XK-SS down Sunset Blvd, Hollywood, California. — Photograph by © John Dominis/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

 

Thelma Camacho~~a dreadfully pretty little girl, with a classically trained voice, who made Kenny Rogers and The First Edition~~who also, having naively misunderstood the deadly poisonous drug called ambition, was brushed off the stage into obscurity, by that very, heartless, drug.

The First Edition Performing At The Bitter End : News Photo

@Page A6 •

March 7, 2013 • Inland Empire Community Newspapers

Thelma Camacho was there for Kenny Rogers &

The First Edition-I Get A Funny Feeling - YouTube
It was 19-year-old Thelma Camacho who bravely took the
stage for Kenny Rogers and
the First Edition in their first live
television performance in 1967 on
the Smothers Brothers Comedy
Show.

 

With Kenny Rogers standing in the background playing bass
guitar and singing harmony, the
young Camacho stood solo as she
belted out the song,

“I Get A
Funny Feeling.”

It was a very difficult song, more of a Julie Andrews number opposed to the
psychedelic sound the viewing audience expected.

Kenny Rogers & The First Edition | Discography | Discogs

The fact of the
matter was that Camacho was the
only member of The First Edition
who was equipped to stand alone
before millions of television viewers.
Camacho spent four years with
Kenny Rogers before Kenny
Rogers was Kenny Rogers.

 

He financed The First Edition when it
split from the New Christy Minstrels, beginning his own career in
the entertainment industry that
eventually rivaled the best.

Although going on to earn a successful life for herself and family,
Camacho would not be around for
Rogers’ greater fame and fortune.
Talking by phone from her jewelry
manufacturing headquarters in
Chula Vista, Camacho said she
still owns one-fourth of The First
Edition. She penned about six of
the group’s songs but said she
could not comment further.

Camacho appeared on the first three albums by The First Edition. 

Camacho was not included with
other members of The First Edition in a 2012 television tribute to
Kenny Rogers for his 50 years in
the recording business.

Camacho
said she “probably will not attend”
a Kenny Rogers show near her
home on March 21, when Rogers
appears at the Belly Up Tavern in
Solana Beach.

She last saw Rogers
22-years ago when he visited she
and her husband, executive producer Robert Ivie when they lived
in Dusseldorf, Germany.

“Did I
think Kenny Rogers would grow
into such a superstar. Yes!” said
Camacho.

“When we started The First Edition, Kenny was 30 and the rest of
us (Mike Settle, Terry Williams)
were much younger. We were all
to share the lead vocals. It was not
to be just Kenny.

But Kenny was
ambitious. Pushy. A good talker.
He was the promoter and we were
young and didn’t realize the things
that he knew. We thought, OK, if
he wants to do all the talking. Let
him talk. Hey, I was actually getting paid to sing,” said Camacho.

Her years spent as a opera
singer showed in her polished presentations.

At 14, Camacho was
already fronting the San Diego
Civic Light Opera and by 16, she
was singing in Italian on numbers
written by Mozart, Verdi and
Bellini. Since she was 3, her parents groomed her to tackle the operatic classics, not the classics of
Janis Joplin or Mick Jagger.

“Needless to say, my parents were
terribly disappointed when I joined
a pop band.

 

Especially since I
turned down a scholarship to study
opera in Milan,” said Camacho.

Thelma Camacho Gaxiola's stream on SoundCloud - Hear the world's ...
With Kenny Rogers and The
First Edition, Camacho was able to
fulfill her childhood dream of appearing on the Ed Sullivan Show,
once the top TV variety show in
the world.

She also appeared with
the group on the shows of Red
Skelton, Johnny Cash, Andy
Williams and Mike Douglas.

 

But
with all the adulation and popularity of The First Edition, Camacho
started feeling the stage shrinking.
Rogers needed more room.

 

She
knew she was doomed immediately after the 1968 Ed Sullivan
Show date.

The First Edition-I Get A Funny Feeling - YouTube

“Ed Sullivan introduced us as Thelma and the Boys
and then Sullivan asked me to sing
a solo. The curtain dropped behind
me and the band was behind the
curtain. I knew I was through,” explained Camacho.

upside-down.htm
Camacho said she never was late
to gigs or missed rehearsals as
claimed by former band member
Mickey Jones, who said that Camacho was fired. In his book,
With Luck or Something Like It,
Rogers wrote that Camacho was
let go because she had fallen in
love, was tired of touring and perhaps didn’t agree with certain decisions.

Mickey Kenny Stock Pictures, Royalty-free Photos & Images

Rogers said the split
“didn’t come as a shock or disappointment to her.”

45cat - Thelma Camacho - Jesse James / Surrender To Me ...

Camacho responded that she
did not agree with Roger’s explanation. “I have no animosity or hatred. I got married and had a young
son. I didn’t want that lifestyle.

Kenny Rogers and the First Edition - Ramblin' with Roger

It’s
cut throat and full of back stabbing.

I received enormous adulation from The First Edition.

Kenny Rogers And The First Edition Stock Pictures, Royalty-free ...
I always wish Kenny well. We had
our differences but I think all
members of bands do.”

She later moved to Europe where
she and Ivie collaborated on commercials, sound tracks, and videos.

Kenny Rogers & The First Edition Portrait Session : News Photo
She designed fashion and jewelry
for Bavaria Film Studios in Germany. Thelma Camacho Jewelry
is currently distributed in Spain,
Beverly Hills and throughout San
Diego County.

Kenny Rogers & The First Edition | Music fanart | fanart.tv

Her cousin is currently compiling 60 years worth of
her songs on CD.

She said that she
has not performed since 1991, but
did not rule out singing smooth
jazz in the future.

Camacho was
also signed to Casablanca Records
in 1980-81 at the same time as
Donna Summer. Camacho admits
that she has forgotten a lot of her
past.

Forgotten Hits: 2/10/13 - 2/17/13
If Camacho had a downside, it
was that she was too finished for
the pop music scene. As a folk
singer she was on par with Joan
Baez and much smoother than
Janis Joplin or Grace Slick.

Thelma Camacho Stock Pictures, Royalty-free Photos & Images

While
the 74-year-old Kenny Rogers
reached unquestioned milestones,
it’s still not too late for an operatically trained singer in her mid60’s.

The First Edition Performing At The Bitter End : News Photo

PHOTO COURTESY/REPRISE RECORDS

Tell it all brother: Why you should dig the groovy music of Kenny ...

Kenny Rogers and The First Edition in 1968. From (L) Mike Settle, Terry Williams, Thelma Camacho, and Kenny Rogers.

Thelma Camacho [Full Album + Bonus] (1980) - YouTube

Thelma Camacho | Discographie | Discogs

IN THE NAME OF GOD.
AMEN
No alt text provided for this image
####################################################################
Index Librorum Prohibitorum
I wear the chain I forged in life.
article-2253237-00BCBB6C00000190-350_634x715

Image may contain: one or more people

How short the list one could compile of those of whom it can be said that fame and money did not deprave?

day3

IL MIGLIOR FABBRO

1147013_363612750432676_183433089_o

Image may contain: 1 person, closeup

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, suit

 At Washington, capital city of the terminally self-absorbed, mortal man holds to fleeting, feeble and fallible opinion, God immutable fact.

      • ~~
      • It is my assessment that America is dying inside, being eaten away by the horror of the collapse of the middle orders, the attendant societal and religious values and customs of those orders and the ubiquity of war making for dubious purpose.
      • ~~
      • The rich man ought not be taxed at all~~he ought be compelled to employ and train the poor man~~directly~~personally.

      ~~

      The principal need in America today is~~financial and industrial De-Globalization~~to facilitate the promotion of the possibility for the average man to get and keep a good job with good benefits paid by the employer~~as was done not very long ago.
      ~~
      ~~Bene Nati, Bene Vestiti, Et Mediocriter Docti~~
      ~

      ~~La crema y nata~~

      ~

      ~~Artista de la conquista

      ~~

      In sunshine and in shadow~~I hold tight to the Republican view of time and money~~I write night and day~~yet~~while impecunious~~I am vastly overpaid~~in that taking pay to do what I love is unfair~~to my employer~~in a fair system~~under such circumstances~~I should pay him~~not he me~~I am far, far too old a man to be sexually confused~~praise Jesus~~but I am yet young enough to be politically confused~~is anyone not~~in an absolute sense~~I am a Catholic Royalist~~in a practical sense~~I am a Classical Liberal~~a Gaullist~~a Bonapartist~~an American Nationalist  Republican~~in either sense~~my head is soon for the chopping block~~to hasten my interlude with Madame La Guillotine~~I write without fear~and without favor of~any man.

      unnamed (1) blue hats 3

      10374522_787949381332342_5064879056003089982_n

      550773_191188294341790_1993333795_n

      • At Washington, capital city of the terminally self-absorbed, mortal man holds to fleeting, feeble and fallible opinion, God immutable fact.
          • ~~
          • It is my assessment that America is dying inside, being eaten away by the horror of the collapse of the middle orders, the attendant societal and religious values and customs of those orders and the ubiquity of war making for dubious purpose.
          • ~~
          • The rich man ought not be taxed at all~~he ought be compelled to employ and train the poor man~~directly~~personally.

          ~~

          The principal need in America today is~~financial and industrial De-Globalization~~to facilitate the promotion of the possibility for the average man to get and keep a good job with good benefits paid by the employer~~as was done not very long ago.~~
          clip_image002MA9982782-0001

          CIRE PERDUE~

          ~~Bene Nati, Bene Vestiti, Et Mediocriter Docti~~
          ~

          ~~La crema y nata~~

          ~

          ~~Artista de la conquista

          ~~

          In sunshine and in shadow~~I hold tight to the Republican view of time and money~~I write night and day~~yet~~while impecunious~~I am vastly overpaid~~in that taking pay to do what I love is unfair~~to my employer~~in a fair system~~under such circumstances~~I should pay him~~not he me~~I am far, far too old a man to be sexually confused~~praise Jesus~~but I am yet young enough to be politically confused~~is anyone not~~in an absolute sense~~I am a Catholic Royalist~~in a practical sense~~I am a Classical Liberal~~a Gaullist~~a Bonapartist~~an American Nationalist  Republican~~in either sense~~my head is soon for the chopping block~~to hasten my interlude with Madame La Guillotine~~I write without fear~and without favor of~any man.
          ~~
          Finis Origine Pendet…
          The escape commences…
          ~~
          September, 1957
          ~~
          Saint Jane Frances de Chantal Catholic parochial school, called, by anyone of any background, simply: “Chan~al,” a place where, of an autumn day in 1957, school,  for me,  began and ended in the first convening of the first grade in which a tiny nun, one Sister Dom Bosco, appeared before me, just behind the window appearing at far left of this photograph, and piped out this: “I may be small, but so then, is the Atom Bomb.”
          ~~
          My determination to escape school commenced immediately on hearing about this Atom Bomb business and took 16 dicey and arduous years to finally accomplish.~~
          ~~
          Non Sibi
          The declaration that:
          “I am here to save mankind,” means that:
          “I am here to rule mankind.”
          50574a838cafa7db2d6ff9751819c753
          The escape continues…
          ~~
          September, 1966
          ~~
          The Cathedral Latin School
          ~~
           Finis Origine Pendet
          ~~
          Κύριε ἐλέησον
          ~~

          Rejoice and Glad!!

          ~~

          Amen~~

          CUA_Cardinal_2008

          ~The Original Angry Bird~~The Catholic University of America Screaming Red Cardinal Mascot~~
          clip_image002MA9982782-0001
          ~~EX LIBRIS~~
          ~~
          THEOS EK MĒCHANĒS
          ~~
          18th Juin, Thursday,  Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi, the 2020th
          
          Website: http://johndanielbegg.wordpress.com

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          John Daniel Begg raises cotton.

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          In the Old South, the real Southland, we had a charming expression, when asked what an idle man did for a living:

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          “Oh, he raises cotton.”
          ~~
        • Which meant, he did absolutely nothing at all, as cotton,  “the white gold,” raises herself.

           

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          CONCEPT OF THE CATHOLIC AND ROYAL ARMY OF AMERICA (CRAA)

           

          THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA
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          Seal of The Catholic University of America

          Motto:

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          Deus Lux Mea Est

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          Acta Est Fabula

          The escape concludes…

          The Catholic University Of America, Washington, The Federal District of Columbia.

          Student walking across campus toward McMahon Hall

          1976, Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi.

          “Who first seduc'd them to that foul revolt?
          Th' infernal Serpent; he it was, whose guile
          Stird up with Envy and Revenge, deceiv'd
          The Mother of All Mankind"
          ~~
          Paradise Lost
          Book One
           Verse 35
           Our Mr Milton
          
           https://johndanielbegg.com/2016/03/09/the-infernal-serpent-he-it-was-whose-guile--stirred-up-with-envy-and-revenge-deceived-the-mother-of-mankind
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          How short the list one could compile of those of whom it can be said that fame and money did not deprave? 

          Acta Est Fabula.

          ~~

          Deus Vult.

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      Our Queen now 68 years on

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      Simply the best President we could ever hope to have.

      Queen Elizabeth II Through the Years - Photos of Queen Elizabeth II

      Regina ~ Fortuna Imperatrix Mundi

       

      May, 1963– Steve McQueen tooling around LA in his Jaguar XK-SS. — Photograph by © John Dominis/ Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images. Local legend holds that at least one L.A. law-enforcement agency had promised its officers that an “expensive steak dinner” awaited the guy who could nail McQueen and the Jag with a speeding ticket. The tale continues that, while he was spotted often and even pursued a time or two, he was never caught and never written. The steak dinner went unclaimed. Another story refutes the entire affair, alleging that McQueen was so awash in speeding tickets he nearly lost his license.

      May, 1963– Steve McQueen driving his Jaguar XK-SS down Sunset Blvd, Hollywood, California. — Photograph by © John Dominis/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

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Red Scare

Photos Show California Prison Crowding Before COVID-19 | The ...
***We very much thank the New Yorker magazine and their writer today, Rachel Aviv, for their excellent job in the following note.  Well done, indeed.***
~~

Punishment by Pandemic

In a penitentiary with one of the U.S.’s largest coronavirus outbreaks, prison terms become death sentences.

Cummins Unit Prison
After inmates complained, an official argued that their conditions were not “ones that today’s society does not tolerate.”Illustration by Jamiel Law
DeMarco Raynor, who is incarcerated at Cummins Unit, a penitentiary in southeast Arkansas, had been approved for its most prestigious job: working at the governor’s mansion. Prison labor at the mansion is a “longstanding tradition, which kept down costs,” Hillary Clinton wrote, in a memoir. (She noted that “onetime murderers” proved to be the best employees.) Raynor saw the position, which was unpaid, as a chance to meet people with the power to grant him clemency. But, shortly before he was to begin, an officer said that he had violated prison rules by wearing slippers that he had made himself. The job was revoked. Raynor believed that the officer had intentionally thwarted his opportunity. “I still maintain my manhood, and he felt like that was too much,” Raynor said. Another officer once told him, “Man, you walk around just like you’re free.”

Raynor is forty-one, and is serving a life sentence for shooting a man during a drunken confrontation, when he was twenty. Raynor, who is black, was convicted by eleven white jurors and one black woman. “I will die remembering her name,” he told me. “She looked at me the whole trial like I was her son, and then, when the verdict came back, she couldn’t look at me.” Raynor monitors his use of language, so that he doesn’t assimilate to institutional life. He refuses to call food “money”; he will not invite people to his “house” when he means his cell. He bristles when prisoners, working unpaid jobs, describe an officer as their “boss.”

Raynor is part of a group of men at Cummins who call themselves the Think Tank. They have all been in prison for more than fifteen years, many serving life sentences they received when they were teen-agers or in their early twenties. They consider it their role to guide younger men. Raynor, who had ambitions of being a psychiatrist, likes to break down the meaning of words like “Negro” and “chattel” and “death,” and to discuss how language shapes our identities. He and his friends hold study sessions on the history of black people in America—“The black man must be awakened to the knowledge that he is not what this society has taught him to be,” Raynor wrote, for a recent session—and circulate books about mindfulness and maintaining romantic relationships. “We are trying to take care of our children,” Qadir, another member of the Think Tank, told me. Qadir, who is forty-four (and who feared that using his full name would result in retaliation), is a clerk in the prison’s kitchen. When he notices that men are sick or struggling, he provides them with double portions, along with a note: “Don’t think you’re going to live on this. I’ve only got a certain number of people I can help.”

In mid-March, when the coronavirus first arrived in Arkansas, the Think Tank discussed the story of Noah. Qadir told me, “Here was a man building an ark, and he is saying, ‘Get ready. Prepare.’ But no one was listening.” Raynor found the story of Moses more relevant: “I view it more like, these are the plagues that God is sending upon Pharaoh, who is in love with his authority, in order to let his people go.”

Every morning, more than a hundred men at Cummins Unit go to work on the Hoe Squad. Dressed in white, they pile into an open trailer, and a tractor pulls them deep into the prison’s fields. Cummins sits on nearly eighteen thousand acres of land and has a hundred and ten thousand chickens, two thousand cattle, and forty-one horses. The men on the Hoe Squad pull weeds, dig ditches, and pick cotton, cucumbers, and watermelons. Arkansas is one of only a few states where prison labor is free. (Other states pay a nominal wage, such as ten cents an hour.) A dozen “field riders”—officers on horseback, wearing cowboy hats—patrol the inmates, and, if anyone lags, they threaten to “call the truck”: a major will drive the inmate to a group of isolation cells known as the Hole.

In late March, the men at Cummins began questioning the logic of going into the fields during the pandemic. Raynor, whose mother had been a corrections officer at another prison in Arkansas, said, “I counselled the men that they were endangering their health by continuing to squish into a trailer, shoulder to shoulder, hip to hip.”

An inmate assigned to the Hoe Squad, who asked to go by his initials, D.B., agreed, as did dozens of others. When officers called their names for work, D.B. said, “we all laid down in our beds.” The men were disciplined for “unexcused absence”—a violation that carries a punishment of up to fifteen days in isolation. “There’s a global pandemic that is air-born,” one man wrote in a formal grievance, on March 26th. “I’m being forced to go out into the field thus putting my life in danger.”

Asa Hutchinson, the governor of Arkansas, had asked that businesses cease “nonessential functions,” and D.B. couldn’t understand how the work of the Hoe Squad qualified as essential. Sometimes, he and the other men would spend a day removing grass with a hoe, in order to clear land for planting; when they finished, a tractor would swiftly mow the same patch. It seemed as if the prison was trying to demonstrate the needlessness of their labor and time. Once, when Raynor was assigned to the Hoe Squad, he told an officer that it didn’t make sense to use gardening tools rather than modern farming technology. The officer responded, “We don’t want your brain. We want your back.”

On April 1st, the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reported that an officer who worked on the farm at Cummins had tested positive for the coronavirus. “You would think our captains or sergeants or majors would warn us about something like this, but they didn’t speak about it,” another officer, whom I’ll call Marie, told me. “They kept everything in the closet. If you didn’t catch the news, you were in the blind.” A spokesperson for the Arkansas Department of Corrections had told the Gazette that the infected officer didn’t work inside prison walls, but Marie knew that officers couldn’t go a day without interacting with inmates. “The inmates run the penitentiary,” she told me. “Officers don’t lift their fingers for nothing. If the inmates don’t do it, it’s not going to get done.” The next day, Marie and a few other officers wore masks to work, but, when they entered the prison, they were told to put the masks away. “They don’t want the inmates frantic,” Marie said. She left her mask in her car.

A few days later, a forty-nine-year-old inmate, Daryl Hussey, who has been in prison for twenty-three years, stopped getting out of bed. Hussey lived in an open barracks, as do about half the men at Cummins, which houses nearly two thousand prisoners. In these barracks, some fifty metal cots are arranged in rows, many less than three feet from one another, and bolted to the floor. When the men lie down, they can smell one another’s breath. One of the men in the Think Tank, Dashujauhn Danzie, was the “picket man” in Hussey’s barracks: he did all the laundry. For more than a week, he had noticed that Hussey wasn’t showering, eating, or sending his clothes to the wash. When people asked Hussey what was wrong, Danzie said, “he just nodded his head like he was straight.”

 

Danzie stripped Hussey’s bed himself. Then he went to the nurse’s station to ask for a boil bag, so he could separate Hussey’s sheets from the rest of the wash. Danzie said that the nurse there, Shirley Lubin Wilson, told him, “Get the fuck away from my window.” In a federal civil-rights lawsuit last year, Wilson was accused of wrapping a telephone cord around an inmate’s neck while a second nurse blocked the surveillance camera. (A spokesperson for Wellpath, a for-profit health-care provider that runs the infirmaries in Arkansas prisons, said that the company “believes these allegations to be without merit.” Wilson didn’t respond to a request for comment.)

Someone speaks to a person with an 'the end is near' sign.
“Can you be more specific?”
Cartoon by David Sipress

Four nurses tested the forty-six other men in Hussey’s barracks for the coronavirus, administering numerous tests without changing their gloves. All but three men had it. Raynor’s barracks was also tested. Raynor said that a sergeant later shouted into the barracks, “Y’all are negative.” But Raynor noticed that when a man defecated a few feet away from him he wasn’t bothered by the smell. He asked his cousin to call the prison’s central office to find out the results of his test. He was positive. “I went around the barracks telling the guys, ‘I’m positive, and you probably are, too.’ ”

Inmates in the prison’s garment shop were given a new task: manufacturing eighty thousand masks for prisoners and officers throughout the state. A woman named Carrie Coleman told me that her son had sewn masks at Cummins for two days while he had a fever and chills. (It wasn’t until he had a temperature of a hundred and four degrees that he was carried to the infirmary.) Marie said that the masks kept falling off her face; when she talked, she sucked the material into her mouth. Then she noticed that the wardens and deputy wardens were secretly wearing masks they’d brought from home underneath the state-issued ones.

On April 21st, Wellpath held drive-through testing for officers. “If your test results are positive,” a memo from the Arkansas Department of Health said, “you may need to work if you do not display any symptoms.” Governor Hutchinson, in his daily press conference, explained, “In terms of the guards that might have tested positive, it is my understanding that they would only be guarding barracks in which the inmates have tested positive.” He added, “So those precautions are in place, and certainly they are logical.” But Marie couldn’t make sense of the policy: all the guards were passing through the same entrance, checkpoints, and hallways.

An inmate named Donnie said that when an officer came to the door of his barracks, where men had tested positive, he asked if she had the virus, and she said that she hadn’t been tested. “Our newspaper says you must be positive for corona if you’re working our barracks,” Donnie told her. He said that she responded sarcastically, “Well, they say your beds are six feet apart, too.”

One night, an older inmate told Marie that he was struggling to breathe. His eyes were bloodshot, and he looked as if he were about to faint. Marie asked a sergeant to escort him to the infirmary, but, she said, the sergeant told her, “Tell him to go get on that kiosk”—a computer touched by dozens of inmates each day—so that he could fill out a request to visit the infirmary, known as a sick call.

Amie Burrow, a nurse who worked for Wellpath until late 2019, in several Arkansas prisons, said that, when inmates put in sick calls, they typically weren’t seen by a doctor for at least two weeks. Sometimes the infirmary nurses would become so overwhelmed by sick calls that—to avoid being fined if they didn’t respond within three days, as was the policy—they would shred them. (Inmates who don’t have access to a kiosk write their requests on paper slips.) “It was general operating procedure,” Burrow told me. “I watched nurses put the paper sick calls in the shredder and never blink an eye.” When inmates complained, the nurses would say, “Oh, the slip got lost in the box,” or “You filled out the wrong form.” Burrow said, “They could easily blame it on the inmate.”

Marie finally called a Code Green, the signal for medical emergency, on the prison radio system. A nurse arrived with a wheelchair, but the infirmary was full. Instead, the man was taken to a holding cell. He had no bed, toilet, or running water. “A lot of times, they forget the inmates are there,” Marie said. “They’ll stay there for hours—hours.”

After the man was taken away, Marie said, she was reprimanded by a sergeant, who said, “He could have stayed on his rack and slept.” She told me, “That’s how they look at it: ‘Tell him to sleep it off.’ ”

By the third week of April, Qadir, the kitchen clerk, had chills and had lost his sense of smell. He had been tested for the coronavirus, and while he waited for the results he reported to his job. Most of the other kitchen workers were refusing to work. Qadir, whose mother had been the president of the N.A.A.C.P. in West Memphis, Arkansas, felt ashamed that inmates might see him as a strikebreaker. As he walked to the kitchen, he said, “I felt eyes piercing my back. I knew they must feel like, Mr. Pro-black—Mr. I-don’t-go-for-this-or-for-that—is working for the system.”

He spent the day unloading canned goods from three tractor-trailers. “I’m physically fit, and for me to take a sixty-pound box and throw it five feet away—I love to do that,” he said. But he barely had the strength to lift a carton of ground beef. At the end of the day, he gathered what he had come for: enough green beans, peas, garlic, vinegar, and plastic gloves to last him several weeks. “I wasn’t going to hold a press conference to explain my reasoning,” he said. “But, hell, I wasn’t selling out. I was there because I needed ingredients to brave the storm.”

By April 25th, more test results had come back: eight hundred and twenty-six inmates and thirty-three staff members had the virus. The warden placed all the barracks on lockdown. With no inmates working, officers had to do the cooking and cleaning themselves. “When the officers saw how nasty the kitchen was, they got out of there,” Marie said. “It had been all right for them to go in there and call the shots. But as far as being in there for long periods of time, moving around and preparing dinner—you can’t do that in filth.”

The officers made rudimentary meals, like peanut-butter-and-jelly or baloney sandwiches, and delivered them to the barracks. Greens were almost never served, an omission that disappointed Qadir but didn’t surprise him. He has been in prison for twenty-five years—he was sentenced to life without parole when he was nineteen, after his friend shot a man and Qadir drove him away from the scene. Before the coronavirus outbreak, he and the other inmates in the kitchen cooked the most nutritious meals they could make with limited ingredients. They poured cans of vegetables into a fifty-five-gallon pot and stirred them with a boat paddle. “When you are feeding your fellow-man, there should be no half-stepping,” he said.

Prisoners often speak of a fear of adapting to incarceration to such a degree that they become institutionalized, losing their individual agency. Once the inmates stopped working, Marie saw that the officers had developed their own kind of learned helplessness. “When you work there, it’s like you really are in the slavery days, because you’ve got inmates there who will actually be, like, ‘What else you need, boss?’ ” she said. “They literally come at you like that. You drop a piece of paper, and they come out of nowhere, running to pick it up, saying, ‘I got it, I got it!’ ”

Prisoners at Cummins take on different identities depending on where in the institution they live. “They’ve divided us into so-called field niggers and house niggers,” Raynor said. The men who work on the Hoe Squad live on the East Hall, where the outbreak began. Raynor once worked as a porter in the infirmary, and, when East Hall residents came in overheated or feeling faint, he would hear the nurses say, “He’s just trying to get out of work,” or “He’s just high.”

The men on the West Hall are treated with less suspicion. They work indoors or in “up front” jobs, gardening or washing officers’ cars. Some work as “domestics” in a community near Cummins known as the Free Line, where prison employees and their families live. They clean, do yard work, and even babysit. Sometimes a warden’s children become so attached to an inmate that if the warden is transferred to a new prison the family takes their “domestic” with them. (The Department of Corrections denies that inmates interact with children.)

The hierarchy among inmates has structured life at Cummins for more than a century. Founded in 1902 on the site of two cotton plantations, Cummins, which was designed as a prison for black men, received no funds from the state; it would support itself and, in years of good harvest, make a profit. There were few paid employees. Instead, the penitentiary was largely run by inmate trusties, who carried guns and lived in shacks outside the prison. Next in the hierarchy were the “do-pops”: when the trusties were about to walk through a door, the do-pops popped it open. The lowest class of prisoners were the “rank men,” who worked on the Hoe Squad. If they didn’t pick enough cotton or vegetables, they were made to lie face down on the ground, sometimes with their pants lowered, as an officer whipped them with a five-foot leather strap. In a memoir, Thomas Murton, who, in 1968, served as the superintendent of Arkansas’s prisons, wrote, “This whole system of exploitation began in the days after the Civil War, when the farmers and plantation owners who were forced to free their slaves looked for a new source of cheap labor.” Murton was fired after he began digging for skeletons on the grounds of Cummins, where he believed several inmates had been murdered. He told the press, “You can’t provide the cure if you don’t know the disease.”

In 1970, in response to a class-action suit stemming from petitions by prisoners, a federal judge concluded, for the first time in the country’s history, that a state’s entire prison system violated the prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment. (“Particularly at Cummins,” he wrote.) The judge described the Arkansas system as a “dark and evil world” operating according to “customs completely foreign to free world culture.” In an annual report that year, the commissioner of the prison system acknowledged that “the so-called ‘self-supporting prisons for profit’ have been exposed as . . . destroying institutions which stand as incongruous monuments to despair.”

The case represented a “profound revolution in understanding the legal status of prisoners,” Judith Resnik, a law professor at Yale who is working on a book about prisoners’ rights, told me. Previously, reformers had tried to claim that certain punishments were un-Christian or unscientific or immoral, but “this was: there are certain prohibitions on how the state deals with me, because I am a human being entitled to rights. The obligation is not a grace—it’s a right.”

Philip Kaplan, one of the lawyers who represented the inmates, told me that, even after the prisons were placed under federal supervision, “we had to pull teeth. Their view was: these are more like animals as opposed to human beings.” The system was desegregated, but the prisoners still worked for free. As late as 1992, an internal investigation found that black inmates were ten times more likely than other inmates to be assigned the job of shining officers’ shoes. Today, though black people make up only fifteen per cent of the population in Arkansas, more than forty per cent of the state’s prisoners are African-American.

Raynor’s mother, Elvera, who began working for the Department of Corrections in 1994, said that officers were ostracized if they showed compassion toward inmates. They’d be branded as “inmate lovers,” a term derived from “nigger lover.” As a poorly paid corrections officer, she felt a sense of camaraderie with the inmates. “The wardens and majors wouldn’t even talk to us,” she said. “They thought we were too lowlife.” After Raynor went to prison, she quit. “I couldn’t sit around and watch what the inmates were going through,” she said.

Bobby Roberts, a former member of the Arkansas Board of Corrections, told me, “What always fascinated me about our prison system is the implied contract that exists between the inmate and the correctional officer.” In theory, it shouldn’t be possible for an officer to contain a barracks of some fifty men, but, Roberts said, “there’s the written prison rules, and then there’s the way things actually operate, which is a matter of both sides understanding the boundaries.”

As the outbreak spread, the contract broke down. Some officers stopped coming to work, because they were sick or afraid. Those who showed up rarely made security rounds. They delivered meals sporadically, on carts typically used to transport laundry or trash. One man said that when he tried to submit a grievance an officer advised him not to expect the form to be signed by a sergeant, the first step for resolving a complaint. The officer said that he’d seen grievances in a bathroom trash can.

Raynor sensed that the officers blamed the inmates for the fact that they were now doing work that prisoners were supposed to perform. “It’s like they think we’re making them do the laundry and sweep the floor,” he said. He told an officer, “This is bigger than me as an inmate and you as a low-level correctional officer. We’ve both been subjected to the same conditions.”

During the last weekend of April, men in a barracks on the East Hall threw a TV through one of their windows. When Marie came to the barracks, they began shouting that their sick calls were going unanswered, and that the positives were being mixed with the negatives. Through the windows of the barracks, she urged them not to riot. “They don’t know the depths of it,” she told them, referring to the administration. “All they know is you all are here acting the fool.” She reminded them, “Regardless of what, you are a man before anything.”

A squirrel compliments a spider on its web.
“It’s not art, really—just something I pulled out of my butt.”
Cartoon by David Borchart

D.B., the inmate who had been disciplined for not going to the Hoe Squad, said that one night, without explanation, a deputy warden told him and five other men to pack their belongings. They followed the orders, but, as they approached a new barracks, they saw through the windows that a few men were holding handmade knives. Another was bleeding. “They were hollering and beefing, and they looked like animals,” D.B. said. “It was like something out of the movies.” Donnie, who was also there, said that one man in the barracks yelled at the guards, “We don’t know if the dudes coming in are positive or negative—you can’t put them in here.”

D.B. and the other men refused to step inside the barracks. “Take us back to where we come from,” D.B. said. For fifteen minutes, they stood outside the barracks, trying to negotiate with one of the deputy wardens. Finally, he and Donnie said, the deputy warden shook his head and muttered, “I’m just about to say, ‘Fuck it.’ ” The men were led back to their barracks. By the time D.B. returned, he was in tears. He is serving a ten-year sentence, for discharging a firearm from his car. “They have absolutely no control over this prison,” he said. “We don’t have nobody to reach out to. I just want to go home and do house arrest. I don’t want to die like this.”

The men in the Think Tank tried to defuse tension between the inmates and the officers, a practice they’d maintained for years. “At the training academy, the officers become indoctrinated that their job is to punish,” Kaleem Nazeem, a member of the Think Tank who was recently released, told me. “But we tell them, ‘As long as you hold on to the core values that your mother and your grandmother gave you, you’re going to be all right here.’ ” He added, “It’s all about pitch and tone.”

When Qadir met officers who were new to the job, he sometimes provided them with what he called “orientation.” He broke down the conditions of the average prisoner. “We want them to understand that we have been working for this prison for eight hours a day, every year, for free,” he said. If an inmate on the Hoe Squad takes a cucumber from the farm—the inmates grow them, but they can go for years without tasting one—what’s the harm in letting the man eat one fresh vegetable? Qadir said, “Some go by the book, some turn a blind eye, and some even feed us themselves.”

To prevent the inmates from rioting as the crisis worsened, the Think Tank tried to get them to enlarge their perspective, too. Qadir, who lived on the West Hall, told them, “Imagine you are a correctional officer at home with your children after a ten-hour shift, and you have to turn around and drive an hour back to work because there’s a disturbance here.” But each time a meagre meal arrived it served as a trigger. “Let this be a safe zone,” Raynor warned the men in his barracks, on the East Hall. “Everybody can’t go down onto the battlefield. Somebody has to be left behind to tell the story.”

Down the hallway, in a different barracks, the men were not easily subdued. On May 2nd, they became so frustrated by the lack of attention—an officer had refused to sign an inmate’s grievance about how they were being fed little more than hard-boiled eggs—that a few men broke open the window of the officers’ control booth and unlocked the doors on their hallway. “Free the boys, man! Free them, man!” an inmate was filmed shouting. Officers fled their posts. About an hour later, an emergency-response team arrived in riot gear, with a cart of weapons from the prison’s armory. The officers sprayed tear gas into the barracks. The chemical can make the respiratory tract more susceptible to infection and exacerbate inflammation. One man appeared to have a seizure. “He just laid on the ground, twitching,” Charles Robinson, an inmate in the barracks, said. “He almost suffocated.”

A combination of smoke and tear gas drifted into an adjacent barracks, where all the inmates had tested positive for the coronavirus. Darrell Jones, who has been incarcerated for thirty-five years, realized that he needed to turn off the ceiling fan. “It was pulling the smoke in from the hallway,” he told me. “People sounded like they were choking to death.” The switch for the fan was just outside the barracks door. As he stepped through the doorway, a lieutenant shot him in the face with a rubber bullet. Jones’s vision suddenly went dark, and he fell to the floor. “If you don’t get back in the barracks,” he heard an officer say, “I’m going to shoot you again.” But he was too disoriented to move; blood streamed down his face from a wound less than half an inch above his left eye. Inmates dragged him inside and began pounding on the windows, saying that Jones needed a doctor. When no one came, Danzie, the Think Tank member, cleaned the wound himself and got Jones into bed.

Five hours later, Jones was taken to the infirmary, where he heard a nurse say that his wound had “opened up like a flower.” He was driven in a van to a hospital in Little Rock. For the eighty-mile drive, he lay across the back seat, behind a metal grille, with his hands and feet shackled. He was nauseated and had no vision in his left eye. At the hospital, Jones, who was not wearing a mask, informed staff that he had tested positive for the coronavirus. It was not the first time that officers, transporting positive inmates, had been cavalier about transmitting the virus. In an e-mail to all wardens on April 21st, Payne, the Division of Correction director, had written, “Hospitals are not wanting to treat our inmates because our staff are not following the guidelines.”

Jones returned to the prison the next morning and, four days later, received a disciplinary violation. “Inmate was given several direct orders not to come out of the barracks but he disobeyed all orders while coming toward staff, posing aggression,” the ticket said. Jones still can’t see out of his left eye. If he keeps it open for more than twenty minutes, he gets a migraine.

At one of the Governor’s daily press conferences, Payne acknowledged that there had been a “minor disturbance” at the prison. But, when asked if there were any injuries, he responded, “No.”

Jones filled out a sick call in early May, but he is still waiting to see a specialist. He now spends his days in bed with his eyes closed, to keep his headaches at bay. He told me, “It’s like they are trying to punish us for testing positive.”

When Governor Hutchinson began holding daily coronavirus press conferences, he set apart the cases at Cummins. On April 19th, he presented a graph illustrating new infections in the past five weeks: cases were dipping, he reassured the public, if incarcerated people were removed from the equation. “The number that we will have coming out of Cummins dwarfs what we’re having statewide,” Hutchinson explained. “That’s a reason, of course, to distinguish those in the reporting system.”

“It hurt,” Qadir told me. “Here it is, right now in 2020, and the Governor doesn’t even want us to be a statistic. Imagine that. If they don’t count us when we’re sick and dying, then we really are nobody.” Another man in the Think Tank told me, “A lot of guys just shake their heads. They don’t think they can change anything—the hopelessness is so big, so complex—so they’d rather not think about it.”

In late April, lawyers for the Arkansas American Civil Liberties Union, Disability Rights Arkansas, and the N.A.A.C.P. Legal Defense and Educational Fund filed a federal lawsuit, arguing that the Arkansas prison system had displayed deliberate indifference to prisoners’ welfare. Fifty years after the system had been declared unconstitutional, inmates believed that they were still being subjected to cruel and unusual punishment. Resnik, the Yale professor, said that conditions had improved since the sixties, but she wondered, “Is it more weighty and terrible now because, even with prisoners having all these rights, the conditions are still debilitating?”

Cummins has had the tenth-largest coronavirus outbreak in the nation—nine hundred and fifty-six people, including sixty-five staff members, have tested positive—but the Division of Correction has made only minimal steps to contain it. The inmates aren’t given access to alcohol-based hand sanitizer, even though the medical director of infectious diseases for the state’s Department of Health has advocated for its use. “Maybe science will take precedence now in current situation,” he wrote, in an e-mail to the secretary of the department. Men are still sleeping in open barracks, less than three feet apart. (A spokesperson for the Department of Corrections told me in an e-mail that if inmates in every other bed follow new instructions to sleep with their feet in the spot typically occupied by their heads, their faces will be “separated by 6 feet from the next inmate’s pillow.”)

The inmates asked that the prison system immediately take more precautions, including releasing some people to home confinement. One of their lawyers, Omavi Shukur, told me, “For so long, we’ve argued that the rate of population growth in prisons is unsustainable, and now that argument has become palpable.” But Kristine Baker, a judge for the Eastern District of Arkansas, denied the request, writing that federal courts should “approach intrusion into the core activities of the state’s prison system with caution.” The Arkansas attorney general had argued that the risks to prisoners were not “so great that they violate standards of decency,” nor were they “ones that today’s society does not tolerate.”

Marie noticed that older men who were sick didn’t bother asking for help. “They just stay on their racks,” she said. “They know how it works. They just lay there.” Some of the sickest inmates were placed in the visitation room, which had been converted into a makeshift hospital, where they had no access to showers or phones. A thirty-year-old man who spent several days there told me he was alarmed when an inmate who had tested negative for coronavirus was inexplicably moved in. The inmate kept trying to give officers paperwork documenting his test results. When that didn’t work, he threatened to break the vending machines if he wasn’t moved out of the room. One man, Roy Davis, died there, sitting in a wheelchair.

The Division of Correction began listing the number of coronavirus deaths on its Facebook page. There have been eleven at Cummins so far. On May 2nd, after two deaths in twenty-four hours, the Division noted that “both inmates were in their 60s and serving Life Sentences.” Raynor felt that the men were being described “like old cows. They were old, and we already milked them.” Within hours of their deaths, their names were deleted from the Department of Corrections roster online.

In the absence of any funeral service, some of the younger men at Cummins gathered in small groups to share pictures and memories of Derick Coley, who was twenty-nine when he died. In a tribute online, Cheryl Tucker, who taught G.E.D. classes at Cummins, described Coley as “one of the most enjoyable people I have ever known.” He was set to go before the parole board this month.

On April 15th, he had been seen by a nurse who noted that he was too weak to walk and his blood-oxygen level was ninety, which would typically indicate that a patient should be hospitalized. Instead, Coley was sent to the Hole, where he remained for seventeen days. His vitals were never recorded again.

The men in neighboring cells became increasingly concerned. “They were telling the guards, ‘He needs to go to the infirmary—he can’t breathe,’ ” Coley’s girlfriend, Cecelia Tate, who was raising an eight-year-old daughter with him, told me. “But the guards just kept walking by.”

Another man who had been housed in the Hole told me, “Listen, these people are supposed to come every thirty minutes, but they weren’t making any rounds. They might come every four hours, but they wouldn’t even turn their heads unless you were calling their names.” To get attention, he said, one inmate banged on his toilet, and, when that didn’t work, he warned the others in the Hole to lift their belongings off the ground, because he planned to flood the floor. The man told me, “It makes perfect sense that Coley was lying back there dying, and no one ever noticed.”

The last time Tate talked to Coley, three weeks before his death, she asked if he was planning to see a doctor. “I don’t know if they’re going to let me,” he said. Tonya Morrow, who, until January, was a physician’s assistant for Wellpath, at another Arkansas prison, told me that, when officers called about sick inmates, “nine times out of ten the nurses would say he’s just faking it or trying to get out of something. If the officer says the inmate has been throwing up, the nurse will ask, ‘Well, have you seen the inmate throw up? Until you see the inmate throw up, he can’t come to the infirmary.’ ” Burrow, the former Wellpath nurse, told me, “It’s a pride issue. The mentality of the infirmary is: these individuals are worthless.” She said that new staff members quickly “built up a brick wall” in order to assimilate to the culture. Those who didn’t were dismissed as “givers.” “They would say, ‘I can’t believe you’re falling for their games,’ ” she said. (Burrow was terminated after making complaints about what she witnessed. Wellpath said that retaliation is against its policy, and denied that sick calls are shredded.)

Officers finally came to Coley’s cell—not to check on him but to clear it so that someone else could move in. He was told that it was time to return to the general population. But, when he stood up, he collapsed. When a nurse arrived, he was lying on the floor, his lips pale. Several men watched through their windows as Coley, who had been handcuffed, was taken to the infirmary in a wheelchair. A man shouted Coley’s name several times as he rolled by. He didn’t respond.

The doctor on call, William Patrick Scott, advised the infirmary staff by telephone. (Scott’s medical license has been suspended three times. In one instance, the state medical board concluded that he had “exhibited gross negligence and ignorant malpractice,” by treating patients while intoxicated.) Coley was given chest compressions by the nurses, one of whom had been involved in the incident in which an inmate was allegedly choked with a telephone cord. According to the coroner’s report, Coley was “worked on and then passed away.”

The prison’s chaplain told Tate she had two days to enlist a funeral home to claim Coley’s body. Tate didn’t have the money, so the state sent her his ashes.

A person kicks a potato wearing very high heels out of a 'world's tallest potato' contest.
“And don’t come back.”
Cartoon by Edward Steed

At the Governor’s press conference on May 16th, Payne stood in front of a backdrop that read “Arkansas: Ready for Business,” and announced good news from Cummins: there were only twelve positive cases. The rest, he said, were “considered to have been recovered.” Based on my conversations with more than thirty inmates or their families, it seems that almost no one had been retested. They had simply had their temperatures taken. Some had been asked to put their fingers in a pulse oximeter, which measures blood-oxygen levels. In a letter to the Governor, Raynor wrote, “Watching a press conference witnessing your saying almost 900 people have recovered at the Cummins Unit and then I walk by a guy that can’t get out of the bed makes me question my sanity level.”

In response to the pandemic, Hutchinson allowed six hundred and forty-eight prisoners who were serving sentences for nonviolent, nonsexual offenses, and were within six months of their release, to go home. Since February, twenty-six states have released more than twenty-seven thousand prisoners. The Think Tank was disappointed that a distinction was made—by nearly every political leader discussing the need for more space in prisons—between nonviolent offenders and violent ones. In 2008, Qadir had drafted a bill titled “Restoring Those Forgotten,” which he sent to the Governor and several legislators. The bill proposed that men who, like him, had been sentenced to life without parole when they were twenty-one or younger should have the opportunity to prove that they had reformed. “In evaluating our penal system,” he wrote in a petition accompanying the bill, “there is a very thin line between correcting and condemning a life.” As Qadir expected, there was no response. Between 2012 and 2017, Arkansas’s prison population grew more than any other state’s, with the number of elderly prisoners rising more rapidly than any other age group.

Laura Fernandez, one of the lawyers representing the prisoners, reflected on the state’s decision to count inmate infections separately. “It’s like a Greek tragedy,” she told me. “They don’t realize this thing is coming right back at them.” Jefferson County, which encompasses Pine Bluff—the city closest to Cummins—had, at one point, more deaths per capita from the coronavirus than any other county in the state. Lincoln County, where Cummins is situated, had the second-highest rate of cases in the nation.

Prisoners are hidden in most realms of life, but, when it comes to infectious disease, the harms of incarceration become visible: political leaders must reckon with the fact that prisons are part of our communities. The boundaries of penitentiaries are porous: inmates come in and out, as do officers, medical staff, venders, lawyers, and relatives. Diseases come in and out, too. The risk of tuberculosis, for instance, is twenty-three times higher inside prison walls—poor ventilation, social density, and minimal sun exposure are fertile conditions for the spread of disease—but cannot be contained within them. A 2015 study in Emerging Infectious Diseases found that in Dourados, a city in Brazil, more than half the cases of tuberculosis among people who had never been incarcerated were linked to strains of the disease inside the nearby prison.

Vivian Flowers, a state representative from Pine Bluff who contracted the coronavirus in late March, told leaders of the Division of Correction that she doubted their conclusion that the men at Cummins had recovered. (Last year, Flowers proposed a constitutional amendment to outlaw prison labor, but it was voted down.) Flowers wanted to be tested again before she returned to the Arkansas General Assembly, which was holding its meetings in a basketball arena, so two weeks after her first test she got another one: she still had the virus. Ten days later, she tried again. She was still positive, even though she hadn’t had symptoms in twenty-three days. “This thing is still working its way around the prison,” Flowers told me. “When the workers leave, they are going to bring it back home.”

By the middle of May, the restrictions at Cummins had begun to ease. The men were told to eat in the cafeteria again, one barracks at a time. On D.B.’s first day back, he saw the warden, Aundrea Culclager, wiping tables herself. When an inmate asked if she was afraid of exposing herself to infected prisoners, D.B. heard her reply, “No, God got me.” He said, “I wasn’t impressed—I just thought it was sad. How can we progress when we got the warden of the whole prison not able to make big decisions, because she’s doing a minimum-wage job?”

Qadir spent his first day back in the kitchen “assessing the damages.” He told me, “Imagine your daughter playing with your makeup, and you come back to see the mess. That’s what this was.”

After the cafeteria opened, a field rider came into Raynor’s barracks and said, “Y’all better start getting ready to go back to Hoe Squad.” Raynor’s job was doing laundry, but he shouted back, “We are never going back out there.”

Later that day, Raynor, who has founded a small organization called Forgiveness, Reform, and Freedom, which fosters reconciliation between offenders and victims, was woken up by four officers. They put him in handcuffs. One officer sat on his bed, rifling through his belongings and throwing papers and clothes on the floor. “Why is all this aggression taking place?” Raynor asked. They didn’t answer. They didn’t find any contraband, but they led him out of the barracks and down the hallway to the prison’s holding cells, where men had been urinating through the bars and defecating on the floor, since officers were coming too infrequently for them to go to the bathroom. As Raynor stood in front of the holding cells, he heard a lieutenant ask the other officers, “Why are we locking him up if he didn’t do nothing?” They allowed Raynor to return to his barracks. He wondered if, after his comment to the field rider, he was being warned.

Some of the men I spoke with were afraid to use their names; they thought that they would be put in the Hole, or sent to the Hoe Squad, as punishment. When I asked Raynor why he chose to go on the record, he told me, “I want the men in here to know that someone they know was willing to sacrifice themselves for them.” The coronavirus crisis, he said, had brought to the surface what most inmates had previously only sensed. “I always knew in the back of my mind: You don’t care at all about us,” Raynor said. “It’s scary, because everything has come to fruition.” He sees the prison as a “microcosm of America, with its own ghetto and suburbs”—the East Hall and the West Hall. He worries that one misguided act from an officer will cause the men on the East Hall to start rioting again. He said, “We suffer from things that we didn’t even know we suffered from.”

I noticed that the men in the Think Tank used convoluted rationalizations to make peace with punishments that they knew to be unjust. Danzie, who is black, was convicted by an all-white jury of killing a white stranger, though it was unclear if the man was murdered (he was discovered in a ditch, and no weapon was ever found) and Danzie has always maintained his innocence. He, Qadir, and Raynor make sense of their life sentences by reminding themselves of unrelated wrongs that they committed as teen-agers, for which they were not tried. “I have to realize there’s karma,” Danzie said. “That’s one of the reasons I give so much of myself to youth. Every time one of these guys go free, they are taking a piece of you with them. So eventually all of you will be free.” Kaleem Nazeem, who was released in 2018, after twenty-eight years in prison, told me that, when people compliment him on his adjustment to freedom, he says, “You’re looking at the student—the teachers are still locked up.”

Qadir and Raynor reassure each other that they won’t die in prison. “God is going to make a way out of no way,” Qadir said. They share the same dream: if they are ever released, they will open their own organic farms. Raynor said, “Imagine me having forty acres and a catfish pond.”

As they watched the protests following the death of George Floyd on the news, they felt that this alternative life might be within reach. The protesters, Qadir said, looked to him like babies, and that gave him hope. “The generation on the front lines doesn’t know the fear of my generation,” he said. “They don’t know the fear of my mother’s generation. They don’t know the fear of our ancestors. And yet they still have the same spirit that I feel when I go before classification every year”—the annual process by which inmates are assigned jobs. They file into the classification office one at a time and stand on footprints etched into the floor. Majors who oversee different parts of the prison—the fields, the chickens, the cattle, the infirmary, the kitchen—sit at tables around them. “They look at you, size you up like a horse, and make bids on where you will work,” Qadir said. “I get this gut feeling in my stomach: the blood that pumps into my veins is the blood of my forefathers.” He went on, “Some people say, ‘Don’t question God.’ I question him all the time: Help me understand so I can endure and be on the road to recovery.” ♦


A Guide to the Coronavirus

Goodbye, Columbus

City employees inspect the decapitated statue of Christopher Columbus in Columbus Park in Boston, Massachusetts, 10 June 2020

A city employee inspects the decapitated statue of Christopher Columbus in Boston
~~
Goodbye, Columbus
If one tears down, destroys and expunges from Lady History’s diary that which one claims oppressed one, how can one later demonstrate one has ever been oppressed?
IN THE NAME OF GOD.
AMEN
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Index Librorum Prohibitorum
I wear the chain I forged in life.
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How short the list one could compile of those of whom it can be said that fame and money did not deprave?

day3

IL MIGLIOR FABBRO

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Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, suit

 At Washington, capital city of the terminally self-absorbed, mortal man holds to fleeting, feeble and fallible opinion, God immutable fact.

      • ~~
      • It is my assessment that America is dying inside, being eaten away by the horror of the collapse of the middle orders, the attendant societal and religious values and customs of those orders and the ubiquity of war making for dubious purpose.
      • ~~
      • The rich man ought not be taxed at all~~he ought be compelled to employ and train the poor man~~directly~~personally.

      ~~

      The principal need in America today is~~financial and industrial De-Globalization~~to facilitate the promotion of the possibility for the average man to get and keep a good job with good benefits paid by the employer~~as was done not very long ago.
      ~~
      ~~Bene Nati, Bene Vestiti, Et Mediocriter Docti~~
      ~

      ~~La crema y nata~~

      ~

      ~~Artista de la conquista

      ~~

      In sunshine and in shadow~~I hold tight to the Republican view of time and money~~I write night and day~~yet~~while impecunious~~I am vastly overpaid~~in that taking pay to do what I love is unfair~~to my employer~~in a fair system~~under such circumstances~~I should pay him~~not he me~~I am far, far too old a man to be sexually confused~~praise Jesus~~but I am yet young enough to be politically confused~~is anyone not~~in an absolute sense~~I am a Catholic Royalist~~in a practical sense~~I am a Classical Liberal~~a Gaullist~~a Bonapartist~~an American Nationalist  Republican~~in either sense~~my head is soon for the chopping block~~to hasten my interlude with Madame La Guillotine~~I write without fear~and without favor of~any man.

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      • At Washington, capital city of the terminally self-absorbed, mortal man holds to fleeting, feeble and fallible opinion, God immutable fact.
          • ~~
          • It is my assessment that America is dying inside, being eaten away by the horror of the collapse of the middle orders, the attendant societal and religious values and customs of those orders and the ubiquity of war making for dubious purpose.
          • ~~
          • The rich man ought not be taxed at all~~he ought be compelled to employ and train the poor man~~directly~~personally.

          ~~

          The principal need in America today is~~financial and industrial De-Globalization~~to facilitate the promotion of the possibility for the average man to get and keep a good job with good benefits paid by the employer~~as was done not very long ago.~~
          clip_image002MA9982782-0001

          CIRE PERDUE~

          ~~Bene Nati, Bene Vestiti, Et Mediocriter Docti~~
          ~

          ~~La crema y nata~~

          ~

          ~~Artista de la conquista

          ~~

          In sunshine and in shadow~~I hold tight to the Republican view of time and money~~I write night and day~~yet~~while impecunious~~I am vastly overpaid~~in that taking pay to do what I love is unfair~~to my employer~~in a fair system~~under such circumstances~~I should pay him~~not he me~~I am far, far too old a man to be sexually confused~~praise Jesus~~but I am yet young enough to be politically confused~~is anyone not~~in an absolute sense~~I am a Catholic Royalist~~in a practical sense~~I am a Classical Liberal~~a Gaullist~~a Bonapartist~~an American Nationalist  Republican~~in either sense~~my head is soon for the chopping block~~to hasten my interlude with Madame La Guillotine~~I write without fear~and without favor of~any man.
          ~~
          Finis Origine Pendet…
          The escape commences…
          ~~
          September, 1957
          ~~
          Saint Jane Frances de Chantal Catholic parochial school, called, by anyone of any background, simply: “Chan~al,” a place where, of an autumn day in 1957, school,  for me,  began and ended in the first convening of the first grade in which a tiny nun, one Sister Dom Bosco, appeared before me, just behind the window appearing at far left of this photograph, and piped out this: “I may be small, but so then, is the Atom Bomb.”
          ~~
          My determination to escape school commenced immediately on hearing about this Atom Bomb business and took 16 dicey and arduous years to finally accomplish.~~
          ~~
          Non Sibi
          The declaration that:
          “I am here to save mankind,” means that:
          “I am here to rule mankind.”
          50574a838cafa7db2d6ff9751819c753
          The escape continues…
          ~~
          September, 1966
          ~~
          The Cathedral Latin School
          ~~
           Finis Origine Pendet
          ~~
          Κύριε ἐλέησον
          ~~

          Rejoice and Glad!!

          ~~

          Amen~~

          CUA_Cardinal_2008

          ~The Original Angry Bird~~The Catholic University of America Screaming Red Cardinal Mascot~~
          clip_image002MA9982782-0001
          ~~EX LIBRIS~~
          ~~
          THEOS EK MĒCHANĒS
          ~~
          17th Juin, Wednesday,  Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi, the 2020th
          
          Website: http://johndanielbegg.wordpress.com

          http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=122865699&trk=tab_pro

          http://www.facebook.com/JohnDanielBeggPublicAffairs
          http://www.tumblr.com/blog/theoldsoldiershome1952

          http://www.facebook.com/john.begg.33

          http://www.pinterest.com/johnbegg33/boards/

          http://independent.academia.edu/johnbegg/Papers?s=nav#add

          http://www.stumbleupon.com/stumbler/jtdbegg

          Tweets: @jtdbegg

          http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=122865699&trk=hb_tab_pro_top
          
          
          
          
          “Jean-Marie Le Pen is a friend. He is dangerous for the political set because he’s the only one who’s sincere. He says out loud what many people think deep down, and what the politicians refrain from saying because they are either too demagogic or too chicken. Le Pen, with all his faults and qualities, is probably the only one who thinks about the interests of France before his own.”~~
          Alain Delon~~Actor
          
          
          
          $T2eC16J,!)sE9swm(wv0BRPCJh43uQ~~60_57

          John Daniel Begg raises cotton.

          ~~

          In the Old South, the real Southland, we had a charming expression, when asked what an idle man did for a living:

          ~~

          “Oh, he raises cotton.”
          ~~
        • Which meant, he did absolutely nothing at all, as cotton,  “the white gold,” raises herself.

           

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        • Catholic and Royal Army - Wikipedia
          CONCEPT OF THE CATHOLIC AND ROYAL ARMY OF AMERICA (CRAA)

           

          THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA
          Logo of The Catholic University of America.svg
          Seal of The Catholic University of America

          Motto:

          ~~

          Deus Lux Mea Est

          ~~

          Acta Est Fabula

          The escape concludes…

          The Catholic University Of America, Washington, The Federal District of Columbia.

          Student walking across campus toward McMahon Hall

          1976, Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi.

          “Who first seduc'd them to that foul revolt?
          Th' infernal Serpent; he it was, whose guile
          Stird up with Envy and Revenge, deceiv'd
          The Mother of All Mankind"
          ~~
          Paradise Lost
          Book One
           Verse 35
           Our Mr Milton
          
           https://johndanielbegg.com/2016/03/09/the-infernal-serpent-he-it-was-whose-guile--stirred-up-with-envy-and-revenge-deceived-the-mother-of-mankind
          10325217_484127205047896_7255341654839362288_n.jpgbegg2
          How short the list one could compile of those of whom it can be said that fame and money did not deprave? 

          Acta Est Fabula.

          ~~

          Deus Vult.

          image002 (20)

      Ne plus ultra

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      Image may contain: 2 people, including Ellen Wolentarski Begg156587214Z

      Our Ubiquitous Presence

      ~~

      Our Queen

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      Image result for photos of truman and princess elizabeth

      Our Queen now 68 years on

      ~~

      Simply the best President we could ever hope to have.

      Queen Elizabeth II Through the Years - Photos of Queen Elizabeth II

      Regina ~ Fortuna Imperatrix Mundi

       

      May, 1963– Steve McQueen tooling around LA in his Jaguar XK-SS. — Photograph by © John Dominis/ Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images. Local legend holds that at least one L.A. law-enforcement agency had promised its officers that an “expensive steak dinner” awaited the guy who could nail McQueen and the Jag with a speeding ticket. The tale continues that, while he was spotted often and even pursued a time or two, he was never caught and never written. The steak dinner went unclaimed. Another story refutes the entire affair, alleging that McQueen was so awash in speeding tickets he nearly lost his license.

      May, 1963– Steve McQueen driving his Jaguar XK-SS down Sunset Blvd, Hollywood, California. — Photograph by © John Dominis/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

 

Simplicity.

Sing

These Facts Will Change the Way You Look at Amish People

In this day and age, smartphones, computers, TVs, and other gadgets seen to take over every aspect of our lives. They become so essential to our everyday life that it’s hard to imagine life without them.

But there are some communities in the United States that have been snubbing modern technology for decades. Amongst them are the Amish people. This group of people is known to have a traditional and simpler way of life. There are many rumors and stigmas revolving around them but their actual lifestyle remains quite unknown.

Still, we listed down some facts about them that will surly leave you in awe.


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Negative Force

Unlike the rest of America, the Amish treat technology as a negative force that takes away from communal work, and distances individuals from their home life. According to the Amish, most technological developments undermines the community.

While this is the reason why they seldom drive cars or use electricity, they are definitely not trying to recreate the old days. Technology is evaluated according to its perceived value to the community, not by its innovation. Some Amish people use modern tools for specific activities.

Negative Force

Close Shave

The Amish first came to America in the early 18th century, and many characteristics of that era are preserved in their traditions such as the recognizable Amish beard. The Amish men sport their uncut beards, but they never grow a mustache.

The reason for this is historical. When their movement was just starting out, mustaches were linked with military men. Being pacifists, strictly against war, the Amish decided to shave their mustaches off. Today, military men favor a clean look, but the Amish tradition has stuck.

Close Shave


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Speaking Up

The Amish refer outsiders as “English,” even if they from different nationality. When they first came to America, everyone that approached them were English settlers, who, obviously, spoke English. The Amish couldn’t refer to them as Americans, because they too were Americans. So they merely called them English.

The Amish know the English language and use it to converse with “outsiders,” but among themselves they speak Pennsylvanian Dutch. This is the simplified version of writing the German deutch, not the Netherlands Dutch. They therefor speak a mix of English and German.

Speaking Up


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Faceless Dolls

The Amish faceless dolls may appear creepy to the rest of the world, but these homemade toys are actually in line with the fundamentals of Amish life.

The Amish don’t want to promote self-obsession or vanity. They consider a doll with a face as an individual with unique features which can make it prettier or unattractive than other dolls.

With that in mind, we can now understand why the Amish prefer to keep their dolls as plain as possible. And looking at their creations, you can still find beauty in these toys.

Faceless Dolls


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Adaptive Learning

Back in the day, Amish children could go to public schools together with non-Amish kids, learning English, Math and other basic subjects, up until the 8th grade.

This setup was allowed by the community until the 1950s, when they decided to remove their kids from the public school system and teach them themselves, at home or at Amish schools. This decision was triggered when they saw that the American way of life became less and less similar to the Amish lifestyle, due to fast advancement in technology.

Adaptive Learning


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Healthy Lifestyle

The Amish way of living is a major factor why they rarely get sick. Many Amish are physically active throughout the day, they don’t smoke or drink alcohol, and they go to bed early, right after sunset. They also grow most of their food in organic fields. With this healthy lifestyle, no wonder they seldom get cancer of fall ill to serious diseases.

Most Amish still practice their own 18th century medical procedures and don’t usually rely on modern technology for their treatment.

Healthy Lifestyle


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Remembering

The Amish people treat Demut – humility – and Gelassenheit – calmness, composure, placidity – as important qualities. They strive to stay humble and calm, rejecting what they call Hochmut, which translates to pride, arrogance or haughtiness.

With their simpler and more modest ways of life, they shun modern technologies including cameras. They also don’t paint. So when a loved one passes away, they don’t have any way to visually remember them but only through their actual memory.

Remembering


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Face the Music

Having iPods or smartphones, and listening to the radio is strictly prohibited in the community. Even live music is not allowed. For the Amish, self-expression could lead to pride and arrogance, and therefore it is forbidden.

However, they do sing songs in church. These songs come from a High German church songbook called Ausbunch, the oldest Protestant church hymnal. Since they don’t have musical notes, the ancient melodies are passed down from one generation to the other through oral tradition.

Face the Music


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Sing Along

Playing musical instruments in public is not allowed as the Amish believe in humility and modesty. But this doesn’t mean they deprive themselves of music altogether.

Some Amish play instruments such as accordion and harmonica in the solitude of their homes. But their musical events in public usually take place in church during mass.

Being an extremely old religious group that has managed to protect their ancient customs throughout the centuries, the Amish are the only community in the world where you can hear ancient songs and singing styles not found anywhere in the world today.

Sing Along


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Rumspringa

The Amish children are confined within their community so they are unaware of the world outside. Young people can become very curious about the “English” lifestyle that takes place in the towns and cities around them.

Instead of forbidding these teens, the Amish tradition has a rite of passage called Rumspringa, a Pennsylvania Dutch word meaning jumping or hopping around.

When Amish kids reach the age of 16, they are encouraged to go on a Rumspringa and explore the world before they decide to be baptized and officially join the Amish congregation.

Rumspringa


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Explore Your Options

Young Amish people may go on a Rumspringa for as long as they like. Some Amish teens return home within a week, while others take advantage of their newfound freedom. They usually travel across the US, and even outside the country, trying out new technology and sometimes even drugs.

The Amish elders have given them consent to explore because they know it wouldn’t be reasonable for their children not to see what they would be giving up by choosing to live in the Amish community. If they decide to return, then their decision becomes ever more meaningful.

Explore Your Options


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Homecoming

Because Rumspringa can take as long as a person wants, some “Rumspringers” decide to stay in the outside world for many years, knowing they can come back to the traditional community when they are ready, without being treated as an exile.

And despite the enticement of the modern world, it’s surprising to see that most of the kids who leave actually return to the Amish community, to be baptized as official members of the group, accepting their simpler way of life.

Homecoming


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Baptism

While some Christian sects baptize babies, for Amish, baptism is one of the most important ceremonies in their life and they consider it as a serious vow that only a full-grown person can commit to.

Young Amish are normally baptized after several months of classes on the subject, and they are constantly reminded that it’s not mandatory but a very serious choice.

For the Amish, it’s better not to make the vow if you are not sure you can uphold it, than to break it later. Those who have been baptized and later broke their vows are rejected by the community.

Baptism


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Shopping Spree

Amish people try their best to be self-reliant to avoid what they consider “worldly.” They build their own houses and barns, grow their own fruits and vegetables in farms, and raise their own livestock. However, they can’t do everything on their own.

When there are times that they need something their community is unable to provide, they go shopping. There is at least one dry goods store in most Amish towns, where people can buy items like books and kitchenware.

Shopping Spree


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The Role of Women

In the traditional world of the Amish, it is usual for women to be housewives. It is considered custom that the man takes care of a woman. They are also not allowed to be preachers or bishops.

But during baptism, the wives played an important role of baptizing the girls, while the bishops baptize the boys. In addition, Amish women create quilts and other handmade items that they then sell them at stores for tourists, and to other Amish communities.

The Role of Women


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No Arranged Marriages

Though the Amish community is very strict and conservative, they don’t have arranged marriages, and young adults can choose to marry whomever they want.

This doesn’t mean they are loose and free to go about their ways. They still adhere to certain rules when it comes to dating, and courting occurs only in public areas.

Moreover, Amish men can only propose to a baptized member of the Amish congregation and can’t propose without the consent of the elders and church leaders.

No Arranged Marriages


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The Wedding

Since the Amish have been living in isolation from the rest of the world, their wedding ceremonies are also based on their centuries-old customs.

Modern day weddings are usually lavish events with many preparations. But for the Amish, this special occasion is simple and modest. There is no exchange of rings, and the bride does not wear makeup or beautiful gowns.

Jewelry, makeup and elaborate dresses are related to vanity, so the Amish choose not to apply them. The Amish bride wears a traditional simple blue dress, while the groom wears his daily black outfit.

The Wedding


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Honeymoon Chores

Modern-day honeymoons are usually spent in exotic locations and beautiful beaches, where couples can relax and enjoy their time together. For Amish, they have a different way to celebrate their marriage.

In their tradition, the newlyweds will have to stay the night after the wedding ceremony at the bride’s parents’ homes, helping with cleaning and other household chores.

This is a traditional way of expressing their gratitude to the parents for having raised and supported them throughout their lives.

Honeymoon Chores


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Honeymoon Tour

After the newlyweds spent the first night in the bride’s parents’ house, the new husband and wife stay with other relatives. Actually, the rest of the honeymoon is one long visit to relatives on both sides.

When the honeymoon is over, the fresh husband and wife usually live in the parents’ homes, until they build their own house. The family usually helps them to construct their new home so that they can start a family of their own.

Honeymoon Tour


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Working Together

In keeping with their Gelassenheit values, the Amish put the needs of their community before their personal needs as individuals. This way they keep adhering to their humble principles.

When a member of the group is in need, the whole community will unite together to lend a hand.

This is usually seen through their barn raising endeavors. The Amish are famous for their fast construction of barns made entirely by hand, without using any power tools. This is made possible by the collective effort of the Amish community.

Working Together


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Three Languages

The history of the Amish church begins in Switzerland, but after persecutions in Europe, the Amish travelled to the more permissive America, where they formed their communities in the early 18th century.

While the Amish are Americans in every aspect and speak English fluently, the language that they use in their day to day activities is a distinct form of German called Pennsylvania Dutch. They only use English to communicate with outsiders. In addition, the Amish give sermons in classic German which is the language their Bibles are written. So, the average Amish person speaks three languages.

Three Languages


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Ordnung

The Amish live by two sets of rules throughout their lives. The first is taken from the Bible, as any Christian community. The second set is more subtle.

The Amish believe in what they call Ordnung. This words means order, arrangement, system, or organization. Ordnung is basically what defines the very core of Amish characteristics.

Many of the practices related with the Amish today are a direct result of the Ordnung. It essentially dictates the chosen lifestyle of the Amish.

Ordnung


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Meidung

The Amish life is concentrated on community and their lifestyle is dictated by Ordnung. There are rules to be followed, and for those who don’t abide, there is disciplinary punishment.

One of the most serious punishments you can receive for disobeying Ordnung is Meidung, meaning “time-out,” and what it entails is being shunned by the community.

Meidung serves as a reminder to the person being disciplined that the community is most important. It may last a few days, weeks or even months, and its objective is to protect the public.

Meidung


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Dress Code

The Ordnung also dictates the dress code of the Amish people. Members of the Amish community have strict set of rules and regulations about the type of outfits they are permitted to wear.

Since they shy away from vanity, their clothes are very old-fashioned, inexpensive, and conservative, reminding of a strict uniform. Makeup, jewelry, and accessories, have no place in their dress code. Women wear similar dresses, while mean wear simple white shirts and black pants.

Dress Code


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Genetic Pool

With regards to Amish wellbeing, they are amazingly healthy, thanks to their lifestyle. Diseases like cancer, asthma, and diabetes are much lower amongst the Amish community compared to the common population. But this doesn’t mean that they don’t encounter health issues of their own.

Inbreeding is common in the Amish community, because of their secluded lifestyle. That means that normally, due to lack of other potential partners, cousins or second cousins marry. This practice can cause some genetic diseases such as dwarfism, Angelman syndrome, and various metabolic disorders.

Genetic Pool


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DNA Testing

It’s common in the Amish families to undergo extensive DNA testing due to the unique nature of their sheltered communities. This test is used to help geneticists in their research about possible genetic issues. This is also used to map better family ties, and to gain more understanding of the dangers certain couples might face when reproducing.

Despite their reluctance to use technology, this new science has been broadly accepted among the Amish but only for this particular reason.

DNA Testing


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Sharing is Caring

Since music and art are mostly rejected in the Amish communities because they can lead to vanity and pride, they found another way to express themselves and to entertain each other.

Food became and attraction, and communal meals are a big part of the Amish community. Everyone brings something to the table on these special events, and the whole community will share their food together. Sharing is caring and for the Amish, this gesture is vital in the makings of a community.

Sharing is Caring


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Go to Church

The Amish are devotedly religious and form their entire lives according to the teachings and beliefs taught in the Bible. Though they are highly devout, their churches are simple and humble looking.

The Amish believe that you don’t need a physical church to learn and teach the Bible because the church can be anywhere, even outside. So with this thought in mind, the church service is quite simple, without any altars, candles and flowers. This is also in line with their ideals of modesty.

Go to Church


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Humility

The Amish philosophy is in line with their customs, and vice versa. The Amish aren’t egocentric or vain, believing that all men are equal. They treat others with respect and serve the community before they adhere to their personal needs.

They also don’t believe that their church is the only correct one. They will accept anyone regardless of their beliefs, religion, origin and race. As long as you respect them and not disrupt their simple way of life, or humiliate them, then you are most welcome to befriend these kind people.

Humility


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Farm Life

Since the Amish people are a farming community, having a large family is significant for everyday work. More children means more helping hands in the field, in the barn, and when taking care of the livestock.

The Amish don’t practice birth control and don’t use any contraceptives, but surprisingly, these are not forbidden in Amish communities.

The average married couple has 5 to 7 children. Both boys and girls help around the house and in the farm. So the productivity of their farming activity is remarkable.

Farm Life


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Turning the Other Cheek

The Amish deeply believe in the teachings of Jesus Christ, in which he instructed his disciples to “do not resist the one who is evil. But if anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to him the other also.” (Matthew 5:39).

So naturally, the Amish are pacifistic and are strictly against any form of violence. They will not use force, even when attacked. They take Jesus’s Sermon on the Mount seriously and they do their best to avoid any military services, as well as service in police forces or even involvement in politics.

Turning the Other Cheek


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Modern Medicine

While the Amish people prefer natural treatments and remedies, they will not hesitate to go to the doctor’s office when necessary, and when their life is clearly in danger. Despite the fact that they don’t use most of the technology of the modern world like electricity and other appliances, the Amish use the help of modern medicine to treat serious illnesses and diseases. So it’s not rare to see the Amish in hospitals and pharmacies in the areas they live in.

Modern Medicine


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A World Apart

“Be ye not conformed to this world”, Romans 8:12 – this is one key principle of Amish philosophy. This is the reason why they stay away from modern technology and live in closed off communities, shunned from the modern world.

Their practices and traditions are there to help them distinguish themselves from what they regard as “worldly” things. The time spent during Rumspringa is aimed to expose them to what is “worldly,” and then make the decision where and how to live.

A World Apart


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The New World

In the early 18th century, the Amish moved to the New World from Europe. The migration was a reaction to religious wars, poverty, and persecutions in Europe. They first settled in Pennsylvania and other groups later settled elsewhere in North America.

Today, they live in 28 states and now over 330,000 Amish people reside all over the country. Most of them continue to have many children, increasing their numbers over the years.

There is also a large Amish community in Canada, and new communities have also arisen across Latin America, with limited success.

The New World


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Mennonites

Mennonites are closely related to the Amish and outsiders often confuse the two. Both the Mennonites and the Amish come from the same Anabaptist faith, and both communities believe that member should be baptized as adults since children still can’t make that serious commitment. The Mennonites also live close to the same locations that the Amish have chosen to settle in.

And still, there is an important difference. Firstly, the Mennonites adopt technological developments a lot more freely. Moreover, while they still dress simply, they tend to wear more contemporary outfits, and are a little more tolerant in their lifestyle.

Mennonites


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Inheritance

An Amish family property, commonly a house and a farm, is usually inherited by the youngest son. This is because by the time the parents retire, the older children would have a family of their own and would have built houses and farms accordingly.

Since men are considered the breadwinners of the family, it is always the son and not the daughter who take over the parents’ property. Women are expected to marry with men from other families who, later on, will have an estate to pass them down.

Inheritance


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Sharing a Bed

Though the Amish are very traditional and conservative, the parents encourage their children to spend the night with the person they are dating.

Still, the young adults should be dressed when spending the night together, and must also be separated in the bed itself. The reasoning behind spending the night together is to get to know one another and bond better.

In the Amish community, it’s also common for lovebirds to hold hands and even sit on each other’s laps.

Sharing a Bed


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Tourist Attraction

By now, we know that the Amish don’t use cameras and don’t snap photographs of themselves. However, some don’t mind when other people take pictures of them. Still, there are others that can be offended, so it’s better to ask their permission first.

Many of the Amish people manage to make a good living out of tourism. They earn money by selling high quality and handmade items to tourists. Their way of life is an attraction to many outsiders, and we can understand why.

Tourist Attraction


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Communication

Some Amish communities allow telephone use, because they understand it comes really handy in case of an emergency. But even then, the phone is not kept inside the house, and is rather placed in a barn, a shack, or any public place where it can easily be reached by those who are in dire need to use it.

The Amish don’t allow phones inside the house because they think it may lure the family to connect to things which they consider “worldly.”

Communication


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Homeschooling

The Amish are skilled and talented at what they do. The products of their labor are considered high quality and are in demand in other towns. But you may be wondering how they became so skillful.

While Amish children go to school up to the 8th grade only, their education doesn’t end there. Community elders teach girls how to cook, sew, and make handicrafts, while boys are taught how to farm, do carpentry and trade – all skills necessary for them to become productive members of their society and contribute to their households and communities.

Homeschooling


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Church and State

The Amish believe that the word of God is far more important than any rules government. And so, they support the separation of church and state.

For this reason, they turn down any social benefits and public funds. Since the church is their only authority, they also never join the military. Whenever a crime is committed, rather than getting the state authorities involved, they discussed and solve the problem among themselves, and let the church decide how discipline and hand out punishments.

Church and State


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Once In a Lifetime Dress

The Amish women make their own clothes, including their wedding dresses. The brides usually wear blue but some communities allow for her to choose a different color. After the wedding, married women should wear the same dress every Sunday to church services throughout their lives!

It’s a scary thing to imagine that the dress you wear at your wedding will be the last thing you wear in your life. But the good thing about this is that you can be sure that the dress is made with the utmost care, so it definitely isn’t easily worn out.

Once In a Lifetime Dress


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Medical Bills

There are times that Amish people seek outside medical treatments. And when they ask for professional help, the medical bills can be really expensive. Since they don’t have medical insurance, they have to pay in cold cash. When this happens, the whole community will lend a helping hand. They all work to get the money, and they don’t stop until the bill is fully paid.

There are several organizations that offer financial assistance to the Amish but the community doesn’t want to rely on others so they usually take the responsibility upon themselves.

Medical Bills


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Mode of Transportation

It is typical to see Amish people driving a horse and carriage down the countryside.The Amish consider owning a car to be risky as it can lure community members to venture outside, and leave their old ways behind. Owning or driving a car is there for prohibited in the community, but they allow outsiders to drive them if necessary.

The other reason why they shun motorized transportation is that it can make them less dependent on their community.

Mode of Transportation


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Outsiders are Welcome

When outsiders want to join the Amish religion, they must first stay in an Amish family for a long while, and take part in the daily activities of the community. They also have to learn German and Pennsylvanian Dutch, as well as to accept the physically demanding way of living. Once they’ve spent enough time with the community, they can choose to be baptized, after which they are allowed to marry into an Amish family.

While it is considered rare, some outsiders have converted into the Amish faith and became highly-regarded members of the community.

Outsiders are Welcome


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Retirement Age

Unlike the rest of the world, the retirement age for the Amish is not fixed in advance. It’s a choice made by taking several factors into consideration, such as personal health and family needs. It can there for vary between the ages of 50 and 70.

In the modern world today, when an elderly person stops working, they often find themselves alone. But this isn’t a problem with the Amish. When a person retires, he or she continues to live with the family, sometimes in a building adjoining the family house called the Grossdaadi Haus. They also continue to take part in family and community activities.

Retirement Age


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Work-ship

The Amish are considered as highly-regarded artisans by modern standards. Their handicrafts are highly valuable and can be very expensive. The reason behind this is that the Amish treat their work as a form of worship, so they take special attention and pour their best effort in everything that they do, be it be carpentry or cooking.

Their isolated lifestyle mostly keeps them from modern designs and trends. It allows them to preserve their traditional handiworks, passed down from one generation to another.

Work-ship


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Shop Online

In the past, in order to buy premium Amish furniture, you had to actually travel to an Amish community and meet the craftsman personally; then place your order, go home and return to pick up your new table or cabinet once it was done.

Nowadays, this is no longer the setup. While the Amish shun technology including the internet, there are several intermediary traders who sell Amish products online, providing an essential link between the old communities and the world outside.

Shop Online


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Cash Cow

Today, the Amish are increasing in numbers and are considered one of the fastest growing communities in the U.S. More Amish people mean higher demand for services catering especially to the community.

One of these special services is the Bank of Bird in Hand, which was the first modern Amish bank. It was established as a joint venture between Amish and outside investors, and caters to the Amish community’s specific needs. This includes financial plans that fit their lifestyle. There’s also a drive-through window built for their traditional carriages.

Cash Cow


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Sing

Amish people go on dates like everybody else. But their ways are more fascinating than going on tinder. The Amish teens have an event called “Sing.” It usually takes place on Sunday evenings at their barns.

The Amish boys and girls gather together at long tables, the boys on one side and the girls at the opposite. Then they sing their favorite hymns, which are normally upbeat.

After the event has formally ended, the teens socialize and may split into couples.

Sing


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Feast

Since the Amish don’t have vibrant music events or cinemas where they can watch movies, their way of entertainment is none other than food.

Food is a major part of Amish culture and any reason to get together, be it a Sing, a wedding ceremony, or just a cool summer night – is an excuse to dine.

The Amish have many traditional dishes and meals that have been passed down from one generation to the next, some improved to perfection.

Scroll on to read about some of the festive dishes prepared by the Amish.

Feast


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Soup Du Jour

In his book Sauerkraut Yankees: Pennsylvania Dutch Foods & Foodways, William Woys Weaver writes:

“The Pennsylvania Dutch developed soup making to such a high art that complete cookbooks could be written about their soups alone; there was an appropriate soup for every day of the year, including a variety of hot and cold fruit soups.”

Soups are considered a practical dish, so it makes sense that the Amish and Mennonites have become real soup experts. Most Pennsylvania Dutch have broths on hand, as they preserve every drop of cooking liquid including vegetable, fish and beef stocks.

Soup Du Jour


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Birch Beer

Root beer and cream soda are popular in some parts of the United States, but the Amish are also known for a drink called Birch Beer.

Birch beer is made from sap extracted from the bark of birch trees and can be either alcoholic or light. The alcoholic version has been brewed since the 17th century and all sorts of variants of the drink have become famous not just within the Amish communities, but in the neighboring towns and cities also.

Birch Beer


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Whoopie Pie

If you’re huge fans of Oreos, you’ll definitely want to try Whoopie Pies. This Amish sweet delight has been passed down in the generations, but only in recent years it has become famous across the U.S.

The mouthwatering pie is like a sandwich but made with two pieces of chocolate cake, with a fluffy white frosting or cream generously spread between them. The traditional cookies are made with vegetable shortening, not butter. And the most commonly made Whoopie Pie is chocolate.

Whoopie Pie


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Shoofly Pie

An Amish feast isn’t complete without the Shoofly Pie. This Amish specialty is very simple to make, and can be made from on hand pantry ingredients. All you need is molasses, sugar, flour, eggs, and water.

Though the recipe is easy, the Shoofly Pie is extremely delicious, and has become a trademark of Pennsylvania Dutch cooking.

The pie has been in Amish communities for centuries and is still served in their homes. It is also offered in restaurants across the country.

Shoofly Pie


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Schnitz un Knepp

More than 100 apple varieties are grown in the United States. So for Amish community, apples have become a big part of their diet.

Apples pies and strudels are widespread in the country, but one interesting dish is the Schnitz un Knepp. It’s a popular dish in the cuisine of the Pennsylvania Dutch and rural families, made of ham or pork shoulder, and cooked with dried apples and dumplings.

Most Amish families have their secret recipe of Schnitz un Knepp. So if ever you visit the Amish community, be sure to include this in your itinerary.

Schnitz un Knepp


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Anabaptism

The Amish religion comes from Swiss German Anabaptist origins. Beginning in the 16th century in Zurich, Anabaptists believed that baptism is only meaningful and valid when a person confesses his or her faith in Christ and actively wants to be baptized.

Amish elders don’t allow infant kids to take this vow, but rather wait until they are old enough to commit themselves, based on their own free will. Some religious authorities didn’t agree with this theological notion and the Anabaptists were heavily persecuted.

Anabaptism


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Other Anabaptists

The Amish might seem like the strictest of Anabaptists groups, but this is not the case. They are a derivative of the broader Mennonite movement. They only adopted the name “Amish” after they migrated to America. In the second half of the 19th century, the Amish were divided into Old Order Amish and Amish Mennonites.

There are several other groups who share similar practices and lifestyles to those of the Amish. So if you see someone shunning technology and driving a carriage, don’t presume they are Amish.

Other Anabaptists


Old Order Mennonites

The Old Order Mennonites are also Anabaptists who speak Pennsylvania Dutch, wear plain clothing, live in secluded communities and shun technology.

It’s difficult to summarize the differences between the Amish and the Mennonites because different Amish and Mennonite communities have different rules.

In general, Mennonites don’t shun modern technology as much as the Amish do. Many of them drive cars and use electricity for specific activities. Some even study in college.

To sum up, some Mennonite communities are stricter than your typical Amish while some Amish communities are quite lenient in the traditions.

Old Order Mennonites
IN THE NAME OF GOD.
AMEN
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Index Librorum Prohibitorum
I wear the chain I forged in life.
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How short the list one could compile of those of whom it can be said that fame and money did not deprave?

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IL MIGLIOR FABBRO

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 At Washington, capital city of the terminally self-absorbed, mortal man holds to fleeting, feeble and fallible opinion, God immutable fact.

      • ~~
      • It is my assessment that America is dying inside, being eaten away by the horror of the collapse of the middle orders, the attendant societal and religious values and customs of those orders and the ubiquity of war making for dubious purpose.
      • ~~
      • The rich man ought not be taxed at all~~he ought be compelled to employ and train the poor man~~directly~~personally.

      ~~

      The principal need in America today is~~financial and industrial De-Globalization~~to facilitate the promotion of the possibility for the average man to get and keep a good job with good benefits paid by the employer~~as was done not very long ago.
      ~~
      ~~Bene Nati, Bene Vestiti, Et Mediocriter Docti~~
      ~

      ~~La crema y nata~~

      ~

      ~~Artista de la conquista

      ~~

      In sunshine and in shadow~~I hold tight to the Republican view of time and money~~I write night and day~~yet~~while impecunious~~I am vastly overpaid~~in that taking pay to do what I love is unfair~~to my employer~~in a fair system~~under such circumstances~~I should pay him~~not he me~~I am far, far too old a man to be sexually confused~~praise Jesus~~but I am yet young enough to be politically confused~~is anyone not~~in an absolute sense~~I am a Catholic Royalist~~in a practical sense~~I am a Classical Liberal~~a Gaullist~~a Bonapartist~~an American Nationalist  Republican~~in either sense~~my head is soon for the chopping block~~to hasten my interlude with Madame La Guillotine~~I write without fear~and without favor of~any man.

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      • At Washington, capital city of the terminally self-absorbed, mortal man holds to fleeting, feeble and fallible opinion, God immutable fact.
          • ~~
          • It is my assessment that America is dying inside, being eaten away by the horror of the collapse of the middle orders, the attendant societal and religious values and customs of those orders and the ubiquity of war making for dubious purpose.
          • ~~
          • The rich man ought not be taxed at all~~he ought be compelled to employ and train the poor man~~directly~~personally.

          ~~

          The principal need in America today is~~financial and industrial De-Globalization~~to facilitate the promotion of the possibility for the average man to get and keep a good job with good benefits paid by the employer~~as was done not very long ago.~~
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          CIRE PERDUE~

          ~~Bene Nati, Bene Vestiti, Et Mediocriter Docti~~
          ~

          ~~La crema y nata~~

          ~

          ~~Artista de la conquista

          ~~

          In sunshine and in shadow~~I hold tight to the Republican view of time and money~~I write night and day~~yet~~while impecunious~~I am vastly overpaid~~in that taking pay to do what I love is unfair~~to my employer~~in a fair system~~under such circumstances~~I should pay him~~not he me~~I am far, far too old a man to be sexually confused~~praise Jesus~~but I am yet young enough to be politically confused~~is anyone not~~in an absolute sense~~I am a Catholic Royalist~~in a practical sense~~I am a Classical Liberal~~a Gaullist~~a Bonapartist~~an American Nationalist  Republican~~in either sense~~my head is soon for the chopping block~~to hasten my interlude with Madame La Guillotine~~I write without fear~and without favor of~any man.
          ~~
          Finis Origine Pendet…
          The escape commences…
          ~~
          September, 1957
          ~~
          Saint Jane Frances de Chantal Catholic parochial school, called, by anyone of any background, simply: “Chan~al,” a place where, of an autumn day in 1957, school,  for me,  began and ended in the first convening of the first grade in which a tiny nun, one Sister Dom Bosco, appeared before me, just behind the window appearing at far left of this photograph, and piped out this: “I may be small, but so then, is the Atom Bomb.”
          ~~
          My determination to escape school commenced immediately on hearing about this Atom Bomb business and took 16 dicey and arduous years to finally accomplish.~~
          ~~
          Non Sibi
          The declaration that:
          “I am here to save mankind,” means that:
          “I am here to rule mankind.”
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          The escape continues…
          ~~
          September, 1966
          ~~
          The Cathedral Latin School
          ~~
           Finis Origine Pendet
          ~~
          Κύριε ἐλέησον
          ~~

          Rejoice and Glad!!

          ~~

          Amen~~

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          ~The Original Angry Bird~~The Catholic University of America Screaming Red Cardinal Mascot~~
          clip_image002MA9982782-0001
          ~~EX LIBRIS~~
          ~~
          THEOS EK MĒCHANĒS
          ~~
          16th Juin, Tuesday,  Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi, the 2020th
          
          Website: http://johndanielbegg.wordpress.com

          http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=122865699&trk=tab_pro

          http://www.facebook.com/JohnDanielBeggPublicAffairs
          http://www.tumblr.com/blog/theoldsoldiershome1952

          http://www.facebook.com/john.begg.33

          http://www.pinterest.com/johnbegg33/boards/

          http://independent.academia.edu/johnbegg/Papers?s=nav#add

          http://www.stumbleupon.com/stumbler/jtdbegg

          Tweets: @jtdbegg

          http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=122865699&trk=hb_tab_pro_top
          
          
          
          
          “Jean-Marie Le Pen is a friend. He is dangerous for the political set because he’s the only one who’s sincere. He says out loud what many people think deep down, and what the politicians refrain from saying because they are either too demagogic or too chicken. Le Pen, with all his faults and qualities, is probably the only one who thinks about the interests of France before his own.”~~
          Alain Delon~~Actor
          
          
          
          $T2eC16J,!)sE9swm(wv0BRPCJh43uQ~~60_57

          John Daniel Begg raises cotton.

          ~~

          In the Old South, the real Southland, we had a charming expression, when asked what an idle man did for a living:

          ~~

          “Oh, he raises cotton.”
          ~~
        • Which meant, he did absolutely nothing at all, as cotton,  “the white gold,” raises herself.

           

        • 11900068_728996890560925_4010112541193348700_n
        • Catholic and Royal Army - Wikipedia
          CONCEPT OF THE CATHOLIC AND ROYAL ARMY OF AMERICA (CRAA)

           

          THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA
          Logo of The Catholic University of America.svg
          Seal of The Catholic University of America

          Motto:

          ~~

          Deus Lux Mea Est

          ~~

          Acta Est Fabula

          The escape concludes…

          The Catholic University Of America, Washington, The Federal District of Columbia.

          Student walking across campus toward McMahon Hall

          1976, Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi.

          “Who first seduc'd them to that foul revolt?
          Th' infernal Serpent; he it was, whose guile
          Stird up with Envy and Revenge, deceiv'd
          The Mother of All Mankind"
          ~~
          Paradise Lost
          Book One
           Verse 35
           Our Mr Milton
          
           https://johndanielbegg.com/2016/03/09/the-infernal-serpent-he-it-was-whose-guile--stirred-up-with-envy-and-revenge-deceived-the-mother-of-mankind
          10325217_484127205047896_7255341654839362288_n.jpgbegg2
          How short the list one could compile of those of whom it can be said that fame and money did not deprave? 

          Acta Est Fabula.

          ~~

          Deus Vult.

          image002 (20)

      Ne plus ultra

      be21c107-c314-4fb3-a2e1-1bc2a6375f93

      10273429_475642092563074_3006900326038764208_n

      11825782_910686702310728_7422264639390513425_n

      Image may contain: 2 people, including Ellen Wolentarski Begg156587214Z

      Our Ubiquitous Presence

      ~~

      Our Queen

      queen-elizabeth-herbert-hoover

      Image result for photos of truman and princess elizabeth

      Our Queen now 68 years on

      ~~

      Simply the best President we could ever hope to have.

      Queen Elizabeth II Through the Years - Photos of Queen Elizabeth II

      Regina ~ Fortuna Imperatrix Mundi

       

      May, 1963– Steve McQueen tooling around LA in his Jaguar XK-SS. — Photograph by © John Dominis/ Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images. Local legend holds that at least one L.A. law-enforcement agency had promised its officers that an “expensive steak dinner” awaited the guy who could nail McQueen and the Jag with a speeding ticket. The tale continues that, while he was spotted often and even pursued a time or two, he was never caught and never written. The steak dinner went unclaimed. Another story refutes the entire affair, alleging that McQueen was so awash in speeding tickets he nearly lost his license.

      May, 1963– Steve McQueen driving his Jaguar XK-SS down Sunset Blvd, Hollywood, California. — Photograph by © John Dominis/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

 

Red China virus revisited.

Image

Beijing tests food supply following new COVID-19 cases - CGTN

Beijing in ‘Wartime Mode’ to Contain New Virus Outbreak

Fears of a second coronavirus wave rise in China - Los Angeles Times

Red Chinese policemen stand guard outside the Xinfadi wholesale market in Beijing, the site of a new coronavirus outbreak.
(The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images)

Monday, 15 June 2020 07:45

Several districts of the Chinese capital put up security checkpoints, closed schools and ordered people to be tested for the coronavirus on Monday after an unexpected spike of cases linked to the biggest wholesale food market in Asia.

After nearly two months with no new infections, Beijing officials have reported 79 cases over the past four days, the city’s biggest cluster of infections since February.

The return of the coronavirus has shrouded Beijing, home to the headquarters of many big corporations, in uncertainty at a time when China is trying to shake off the economic torpor caused by the disease.

“The containment efforts have rapidly entered into a wartime mode,” senior city government official Xu Ying told a news conference.

Xu said 7,200 neighbourhoods and nearly 100,000 epidemic-control workers had entered the “battlefield.”

The outbreak has been traced to the sprawling Xinfadi market where thousands of tons of vegetables, fruits and meat change hands each day.

A complex of warehouses and trading halls spanning an area the size of nearly 160 soccer fields, Xinfadi is more than 20 times larger than the seafood market in the city of Wuhan where the outbreak was first identified.

The new cases have led to officials in many parts of Beijing reimposing tough measures to stifle the spread of the virus, including around-the-clock security checkpoints, closing schools and sports venues and reinstating temperature checks at malls, supermarkets and offices.

Beijing residents were also advised to avoid crowds and gathering in groups for meals.

Some districts even sent officials to residential compounds in what they described as a “knock, knock” operation to identify people who had visited Xinfadi or been in contact with people who had.

None of Beijing’s 16 districts have been hit by a blanket lockdown.

But access to the neighbourhoods of the people who were infected have been blocked as nucleic acid tests are being administered to residents.

The 11 neighbourhoods around Xinfadi and 10 others near another market have also been sealed as 90,000 residents undergo tests.

Beijing began mass testing on Sunday.

From Europe?

The World Health Organization said on Sunday it was informed of the outbreak and an investigation by Chinese officials.

“WHO understands that genetic sequences will be released as soon as possible once further laboratory analyses are completed,” it said in a statement.

Foreign ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian, when asked whether China had shared data with the WHO about the cluster, told reporters he was not aware of the specifics but China and the WHO were in close communication.

An epidemiologist with the Beijing government said on Sunday a DNA sequencing of the virus showed the Xinfadi outbreak could have come from Europe.

“The pattern of mutation and transmission of the new coronavirus is not yet fully understood, and with the epidemic still spreading overseas, the situation in the capital is very severe,” said Xu Hejian, spokesman for the Beijing city government, told a news conference.

Governments in other parts of China warned residents against non-essential travel to the capital, and implemented isolation protocols for visitors from Beijing.

Wang Xiaoyang, who works in public relations in the southern boomtown of Shenzhen, said she got a text message from authorities telling her to stay at home for 14 days after returning from Beijing on Friday.

The northeastern province of Liaoning and Hebei in the north reported a handful of cases linked to the Beijing cluster. Sichuan in the southwest reported one suspected case.

Baoding, an industrialised city southwest of Beijing, was closely monitoring people arriving.

“Every gate to Baoding should be strictly guarded to prevent the contagion from spreading,” state media quoted officials as saying.

© 2020 Thomson/Reuters. All rights reserved.

IN THE NAME OF GOD.
AMEN
No alt text provided for this image
####################################################################
Index Librorum Prohibitorum
I wear the chain I forged in life.
article-2253237-00BCBB6C00000190-350_634x715

Image may contain: one or more people

How short the list one could compile of those of whom it can be said that fame and money did not deprave?

day3

IL MIGLIOR FABBRO

1147013_363612750432676_183433089_o

Image may contain: 1 person, closeup

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, suit

 At Washington, capital city of the terminally self-absorbed, mortal man holds to fleeting, feeble and fallible opinion, God immutable fact.

      • ~~
      • It is my assessment that America is dying inside, being eaten away by the horror of the collapse of the middle orders, the attendant societal and religious values and customs of those orders and the ubiquity of war making for dubious purpose.
      • ~~
      • The rich man ought not be taxed at all~~he ought be compelled to employ and train the poor man~~directly~~personally.

      ~~

      The principal need in America today is~~financial and industrial De-Globalization~~to facilitate the promotion of the possibility for the average man to get and keep a good job with good benefits paid by the employer~~as was done not very long ago.
      ~~
      ~~Bene Nati, Bene Vestiti, Et Mediocriter Docti~~
      ~

      ~~La crema y nata~~

      ~

      ~~Artista de la conquista

      ~~

      In sunshine and in shadow~~I hold tight to the Republican view of time and money~~I write night and day~~yet~~while impecunious~~I am vastly overpaid~~in that taking pay to do what I love is unfair~~to my employer~~in a fair system~~under such circumstances~~I should pay him~~not he me~~I am far, far too old a man to be sexually confused~~praise Jesus~~but I am yet young enough to be politically confused~~is anyone not~~in an absolute sense~~I am a Catholic Royalist~~in a practical sense~~I am a Classical Liberal~~a Gaullist~~a Bonapartist~~an American Nationalist  Republican~~in either sense~~my head is soon for the chopping block~~to hasten my interlude with Madame La Guillotine~~I write without fear~and without favor of~any man.

      unnamed (1) blue hats 3

      10374522_787949381332342_5064879056003089982_n

      550773_191188294341790_1993333795_n

      • At Washington, capital city of the terminally self-absorbed, mortal man holds to fleeting, feeble and fallible opinion, God immutable fact.
          • ~~
          • It is my assessment that America is dying inside, being eaten away by the horror of the collapse of the middle orders, the attendant societal and religious values and customs of those orders and the ubiquity of war making for dubious purpose.
          • ~~
          • The rich man ought not be taxed at all~~he ought be compelled to employ and train the poor man~~directly~~personally.

          ~~

          The principal need in America today is~~financial and industrial De-Globalization~~to facilitate the promotion of the possibility for the average man to get and keep a good job with good benefits paid by the employer~~as was done not very long ago.~~
          clip_image002MA9982782-0001

          CIRE PERDUE~

          ~~Bene Nati, Bene Vestiti, Et Mediocriter Docti~~
          ~

          ~~La crema y nata~~

          ~

          ~~Artista de la conquista

          ~~

          In sunshine and in shadow~~I hold tight to the Republican view of time and money~~I write night and day~~yet~~while impecunious~~I am vastly overpaid~~in that taking pay to do what I love is unfair~~to my employer~~in a fair system~~under such circumstances~~I should pay him~~not he me~~I am far, far too old a man to be sexually confused~~praise Jesus~~but I am yet young enough to be politically confused~~is anyone not~~in an absolute sense~~I am a Catholic Royalist~~in a practical sense~~I am a Classical Liberal~~a Gaullist~~a Bonapartist~~an American Nationalist  Republican~~in either sense~~my head is soon for the chopping block~~to hasten my interlude with Madame La Guillotine~~I write without fear~and without favor of~any man.
          ~~
          Finis Origine Pendet…
          The escape commences…
          ~~
          September, 1957
          ~~
          Saint Jane Frances de Chantal Catholic parochial school, called, by anyone of any background, simply: “Chan~al,” a place where, of an autumn day in 1957, school,  for me,  began and ended in the first convening of the first grade in which a tiny nun, one Sister Dom Bosco, appeared before me, just behind the window appearing at far left of this photograph, and piped out this: “I may be small, but so then, is the Atom Bomb.”
          ~~
          My determination to escape school commenced immediately on hearing about this Atom Bomb business and took 16 dicey and arduous years to finally accomplish.~~
          ~~
          Non Sibi
          The declaration that:
          “I am here to save mankind,” means that:
          “I am here to rule mankind.”
          50574a838cafa7db2d6ff9751819c753
          The escape continues…
          ~~
          September, 1966
          ~~
          The Cathedral Latin School
          ~~
           Finis Origine Pendet
          ~~
          Κύριε ἐλέησον
          ~~

          Rejoice and Glad!!

          ~~

          Amen~~

          CUA_Cardinal_2008

          ~The Original Angry Bird~~The Catholic University of America Screaming Red Cardinal Mascot~~
          clip_image002MA9982782-0001
          ~~EX LIBRIS~~
          ~~
          THEOS EK MĒCHANĒS
          ~~
          15th Juin, Monday,  Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi, the 2020th
          
          Website: http://johndanielbegg.wordpress.com

          http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=122865699&trk=tab_pro

          http://www.facebook.com/JohnDanielBeggPublicAffairs
          http://www.tumblr.com/blog/theoldsoldiershome1952

          http://www.facebook.com/john.begg.33

          http://www.pinterest.com/johnbegg33/boards/

          http://independent.academia.edu/johnbegg/Papers?s=nav#add

          http://www.stumbleupon.com/stumbler/jtdbegg

          Tweets: @jtdbegg

          http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=122865699&trk=hb_tab_pro_top
          
          
          
          
          “Jean-Marie Le Pen is a friend. He is dangerous for the political set because he’s the only one who’s sincere. He says out loud what many people think deep down, and what the politicians refrain from saying because they are either too demagogic or too chicken. Le Pen, with all his faults and qualities, is probably the only one who thinks about the interests of France before his own.”~~
          Alain Delon~~Actor
          
          
          
          $T2eC16J,!)sE9swm(wv0BRPCJh43uQ~~60_57

          John Daniel Begg raises cotton.

          ~~

          In the Old South, the real Southland, we had a charming expression, when asked what an idle man did for a living:

          ~~

          “Oh, he raises cotton.”
          ~~
        • Which meant, he did absolutely nothing at all, as cotton,  “the white gold,” raises herself.

           

        • 11900068_728996890560925_4010112541193348700_n
        • Catholic and Royal Army - Wikipedia
          CONCEPT OF THE CATHOLIC AND ROYAL ARMY OF AMERICA (CRAA)

           

          THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA
          Logo of The Catholic University of America.svg
          Seal of The Catholic University of America

          Motto:

          ~~

          Deus Lux Mea Est

          ~~

          Acta Est Fabula

          The escape concludes…

          The Catholic University Of America, Washington, The Federal District of Columbia.

          Student walking across campus toward McMahon Hall

          1976, Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi.

          “Who first seduc'd them to that foul revolt?
          Th' infernal Serpent; he it was, whose guile
          Stird up with Envy and Revenge, deceiv'd
          The Mother of All Mankind"
          ~~
          Paradise Lost
          Book One
           Verse 35
           Our Mr Milton
          
           https://johndanielbegg.com/2016/03/09/the-infernal-serpent-he-it-was-whose-guile--stirred-up-with-envy-and-revenge-deceived-the-mother-of-mankind
          10325217_484127205047896_7255341654839362288_n.jpgbegg2
          How short the list one could compile of those of whom it can be said that fame and money did not deprave? 

          Acta Est Fabula.

          ~~

          Deus Vult.

          image002 (20)

      Ne plus ultra

      be21c107-c314-4fb3-a2e1-1bc2a6375f93

      10273429_475642092563074_3006900326038764208_n

      11825782_910686702310728_7422264639390513425_n

      Image may contain: 2 people, including Ellen Wolentarski Begg156587214Z

      Our Ubiquitous Presence

      ~~

      Our Queen

      queen-elizabeth-herbert-hoover

      Image result for photos of truman and princess elizabeth

      Our Queen now 68 years on

      ~~

      Simply the best President we could ever hope to have.

      Queen Elizabeth II Through the Years - Photos of Queen Elizabeth II

      Regina ~ Fortuna Imperatrix Mundi

       

      May, 1963– Steve McQueen tooling around LA in his Jaguar XK-SS. — Photograph by © John Dominis/ Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images. Local legend holds that at least one L.A. law-enforcement agency had promised its officers that an “expensive steak dinner” awaited the guy who could nail McQueen and the Jag with a speeding ticket. The tale continues that, while he was spotted often and even pursued a time or two, he was never caught and never written. The steak dinner went unclaimed. Another story refutes the entire affair, alleging that McQueen was so awash in speeding tickets he nearly lost his license.

      May, 1963– Steve McQueen driving his Jaguar XK-SS down Sunset Blvd, Hollywood, California. — Photograph by © John Dominis/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

 

Whitewashing History

griot-magazine-peter-norman-white -man-in-that-photo-black power statue san jose-©reddit

Where Is The White Man?

The White Man in That Photo

By Riccardo Gazzaniga / griotmag.com

Sometimes photographs deceive. Take this one, for example. It represents John Carlos and Tommie Smith’s rebellious gesture the day they won medals for the 200 meters at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City, and it certainly deceived me for a long time.

I always saw the photo as a powerful image of two barefoot black men, with their heads bowed, their black-gloved fists in the air while the US National Anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner,” played. It was a strong symbolic gesture – taking a stand for African American civil rights in a year of tragedies that included the death of Martin Luther King and Bobby Kennedy.

It’s a historic photo of two men of color. For this reason I never really paid attention to the other man, white, like me, motionless on the second step of the medal podium. I considered him as a random presence, an extra in Carlos and Smith’s moment, or a kind of intruder. Actually, I even thought that that guy – who seemed to be just a simpering Englishman – represented, in his icy immobility, the will to resist the change that Smith and Carlos were invoking in their silent protest. But I was wrong.

Thanks to an old article by Gianni Mura, today I discovered the truth: that white man in the photo is, perhaps, the third hero of that night in 1968. His name was Peter Norman, he was an Australian that arrived in the 200 meters finals after having ran an amazing 20.22 in the semi finals. Only the two Americans, Tommie “The Jet” Smith and John Carlos had done better: 20.14 and 20.12, respectively.

It seemed as if the victory would be decided between the two Americans. Norman was an unknown sprinter, who seemed to just be having a good couple of heats. John Carlos, years later, said that he was asked what happened to the small white guy – standing at 5’6”tall, and running as fast as him and Smith, both taller than 6’2”.

The time for the finals arrives, and the outsider Peter Norman runs the race of a lifetime, improving on his time yet again. He finishes the race at 20.06, his best performance ever, an Australian record that still stands today, 47 years later.

But that record wasn’t enough, because Tommie Smith was really “The Jet,” and he responded to Norman’s Australian record with a world record. In short, it was a great race.

Yet that race will never be as memorable as what followed at the award ceremony.

It didn’t take long after the race to realize that something big, unprecedented, was about to take place on the medal podium. Smith and Carlos decided they wanted to show the entire world what their fight for human rights looked like, and word spread among the athletes.

Norman was a white man from Australia, a country that had strict apartheid laws, almost as strict as South Africa. There was tension and protests in the streets of Australia following heavy restrictions on non-white immigration and discriminatory laws against aboriginal people, some of which consisted of forced adoptions of native children to white families.

The two Americans had asked Norman if he believed in human rights. Norman said he did. They asked him if he believed in God, and he, who had been in the Salvation Army, said he believed strongly in God. “We knew that what we were going to do was far greater than any athletic feat, and he said “I’ll stand with you” – remembers John Carlos – “I expected to see fear in Norman’s eyes, but instead we saw love.”

Smith and Carlos had decided to get up on the stadium wearing the Olympic Project for Human Rights badge, a movement of athletes in support of the battle for equality.

They would receive their medals barefoot, representing the poverty facing people of color. They would wear the famous black gloves, a symbol of the Black Panthers’ cause. But before going up on the podium they realized they only had one pair of black gloves. “Take one each”, Norman suggested. Smith and Carlos took his advice.

But then Norman did something else. “I believe in what you believe. Do you have another one of those for me ?” he asked pointing to the Olympic Project for Human Rights badge on the others’ chests. “That way I can show my support in your cause.” Smith admitted to being astonished, ruminating: “Who is this white Australian guy? He won his silver medal, can’t he just take it and that be enough!”.

Smith responded that he didn’t, also because he would not be denied his badge. There happened to be a white American rower with them, Paul Hoffman, an activist with the Olympic Project for Human Rights. After hearing everything he thought “if a white Australian is going to ask me for an Olympic Project for Human Rights badge, then by God he would have one!” Hoffman didn’t hesitate: “I gave him the only one I had: mine”.

The three went out on the field and got up on the podium: the rest is history, preserved in the power of the photo. “I couldn’t see what was happening,” Norman recounts, “[but] I had known they had gone through with their plans when a voice in the crowd sang the American anthem but then faded to nothing. The stadium went quiet.”

The head of the American delegation vowed that these athletes would pay the price their entire lives for that gesture, a gesture he thought had nothing to do with the sport. Smith and Carlos were immediately suspended from the American Olympic team and expelled from the Olympic Village, while the rower Hoffman was accused of conspiracy.

Once home the two fastest men in the world faced heavy repercussions and death threats.

But time, in the end, proved that they had been right and they became champions in the fight for human rights. With their image restored they collaborated with the American team of Athletics, and a statue of them was erected at the San Jose State University. Peter Norman is absent from this statue. His absence from the podium step seems an epitaph of a hero that no one ever noticed. A forgotten athlete, deleted from history, even in Australia, his own country.

griot-magazine-peter-norman-white -man-in-that-photo-black power statue san jose-©reddit

Four years later at the 1972 Summer Olympics that took place in Munich, Germany, Norman wasn’t part of the Australian sprinters team, despite having run qualifying times for the 200 meters thirteen times and the 100 meters five times.

Norman left competitive athletics behind after this disappointment, continuing to run at the amateur level.

Back in the change-resisting, whitewashed Australia he was treated like an outsider, his family outcasted, and work impossible to find. For a time he worked as a gym teacher, continuing to struggle against inequalities as a trade unionist and occasionally working in a butcher shop. An injury caused Norman to contract gangrene which led to issues with depression and alcoholism.

As John Carlos said, “If we were getting beat up, Peter was facing an entire country and suffering alone.” For years Norman had only one chance to save himself: he was invited to condemn his co-athletes, John Carlos and Tommie Smith’s gesture in exchange for a pardon from the system that ostracized him.

A pardon that would have allowed him to find a stable job through the Australian Olympic Committee and be part of the organization of the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games. Norman never gave in and never condemned the choice of the two Americans.

He was the greatest Australian sprinter in history and the holder of the 200 meter record, yet he wasn’t even invited to the Olympics in Sydney. It was the American Olympic Committee, that once they learned of this news asked him to join their group and invited him to Olympic champion Michael Johnson’s birthday party, for whom Peter Norman was a role model and a hero.

Norman died suddenly from a heart attack in 2006, without his country ever having apologized for their treatment of him. At his funeral Tommie Smith and John Carlos, Norman’s friends since that moment in 1968, were his pallbearers, sending him off as a hero.

griot-magazine-peter-norman-funerals-white -man-in-that-photo-black power salute

“Peter was a lone soldier. He consciously chose to be a sacrificial lamb in the name of human rights. There’s no one more than him that Australia should honor, recognize and appreciate” John Carlos said.

“He paid the price with his choice,” explained Tommie Smith, “It wasn’t just a simple gesture to help us, it was HIS fight. He was a white man, a white Australian man among two men of color, standing up in the moment of victory, all in the name of the same thing”.

Only in 2012 did the Australian Parliament approve a motion to formally apologize to Peter Norman and rewrite him into history with this statement:

This House “recognises the extraordinary athletic achievements of the late Peter Norman, who won the silver medal in the 200 meters sprint running event at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics, in a time of 20.06 seconds, which still stands as the Australian record”.

“Acknowledges the bravery of Peter Norman in donning an Olympic Project for Human Rights badge on the podium, in solidarity with African-American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos, who gave the ‘black power’ salute”.

“Apologises to Peter Norman for the wrong done by Australia in failing to send him to the 1972 Munich Olympics, despite repeatedly qualifying; and belatedly recognises the powerful role that Peter Norman played in furthering racial equality”.

However, perhaps, the words that remind us best of Peter Norman are simply his own words when describing the reasons for his gesture, in the documentary film “Salute,” written, directed and produced by his nephew Matt.

“I couldn’t see why a black man couldn’t drink the same water from a water fountain, take the same bus or go to the same school as a white man.

There was a social injustice that I couldn’t do anything for from where I was, but I certainly hated it.

It has been said that sharing my silver medal with that incident on the victory dais detracted from my performance.

On the contrary.

I have to confess, I was rather proud to be part of it”.

griot-magazine-Tommie Smith-John Carlos-Peter Norman

When even today it seems the fight for human rights and equality is never-ending, and innocent lives are being taken, we have to remember the people that have already made self-sacrifices, like Peter Norman, and try to emulate their example. Equality and justice is not a single community’s fight, it’s everyone’s.

So this October, when I’ll be in San Jose, I am going to visit the Olympic Black Power statue on the San Jose State University campus, and that empty podium step will remind me of a forgotten, but truly courageous hero, Peter Norman.

Author Update 10/13/2015: The author has written a blog in response to the comments he’s received since the post went viral: “The Writer In That Post

Update from Films For Action 10/18/2015: In the week since we first shared it, this wonderful article has been read by more than 4 million people. Clearly this is a story that resonates universally, one that uplifts and shows the best side of human nature. There has been a great deal of discussion about the article since then, and one of the themes that emerged concerned the statue in San Jose (pictured in the article). In the statue the spot where Peter Norman stood is empty, prompting many to call for him to be added. It transpires that this was not something Norman wanted. In an interview on Democracy Now, John Carlos explains that Norman wanted his spot empty so that anyone visiting the statue could stand on it and have their photo taken on the plinth, standing in solidarity with Smith and Carlos, as he had done. Peter Norman, we salute you.


Original text by Italian writer Riccardo Gazzaniga
Translation and comment by Alexa Combs Dieffenbach
Films For Action edited one sentence to more accurately reflect our own editorial views. The original is here.
Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License

IN THE NAME OF GOD.
AMEN
No alt text provided for this image
####################################################################
Index Librorum Prohibitorum
I wear the chain I forged in life.
article-2253237-00BCBB6C00000190-350_634x715

Image may contain: one or more people

How short the list one could compile of those of whom it can be said that fame and money did not deprave?

day3

IL MIGLIOR FABBRO

1147013_363612750432676_183433089_o

Image may contain: 1 person, closeup

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, suit

 At Washington, capital city of the terminally self-absorbed, mortal man holds to fleeting, feeble and fallible opinion, God immutable fact.

      • ~~
      • It is my assessment that America is dying inside, being eaten away by the horror of the collapse of the middle orders, the attendant societal and religious values and customs of those orders and the ubiquity of war making for dubious purpose.
      • ~~
      • The rich man ought not be taxed at all~~he ought be compelled to employ and train the poor man~~directly~~personally.

      ~~

      The principal need in America today is~~financial and industrial De-Globalization~~to facilitate the promotion of the possibility for the average man to get and keep a good job with good benefits paid by the employer~~as was done not very long ago.
      ~~
      ~~Bene Nati, Bene Vestiti, Et Mediocriter Docti~~
      ~

      ~~La crema y nata~~

      ~

      ~~Artista de la conquista

      ~~

      In sunshine and in shadow~~I hold tight to the Republican view of time and money~~I write night and day~~yet~~while impecunious~~I am vastly overpaid~~in that taking pay to do what I love is unfair~~to my employer~~in a fair system~~under such circumstances~~I should pay him~~not he me~~I am far, far too old a man to be sexually confused~~praise Jesus~~but I am yet young enough to be politically confused~~is anyone not~~in an absolute sense~~I am a Catholic Royalist~~in a practical sense~~I am a Classical Liberal~~a Gaullist~~a Bonapartist~~an American Nationalist  Republican~~in either sense~~my head is soon for the chopping block~~to hasten my interlude with Madame La Guillotine~~I write without fear~and without favor of~any man.

      unnamed (1) blue hats 3

      10374522_787949381332342_5064879056003089982_n

      550773_191188294341790_1993333795_n

      • At Washington, capital city of the terminally self-absorbed, mortal man holds to fleeting, feeble and fallible opinion, God immutable fact.
          • ~~
          • It is my assessment that America is dying inside, being eaten away by the horror of the collapse of the middle orders, the attendant societal and religious values and customs of those orders and the ubiquity of war making for dubious purpose.
          • ~~
          • The rich man ought not be taxed at all~~he ought be compelled to employ and train the poor man~~directly~~personally.

          ~~

          The principal need in America today is~~financial and industrial De-Globalization~~to facilitate the promotion of the possibility for the average man to get and keep a good job with good benefits paid by the employer~~as was done not very long ago.~~
          clip_image002MA9982782-0001

          CIRE PERDUE~

          ~~Bene Nati, Bene Vestiti, Et Mediocriter Docti~~
          ~

          ~~La crema y nata~~

          ~

          ~~Artista de la conquista

          ~~

          In sunshine and in shadow~~I hold tight to the Republican view of time and money~~I write night and day~~yet~~while impecunious~~I am vastly overpaid~~in that taking pay to do what I love is unfair~~to my employer~~in a fair system~~under such circumstances~~I should pay him~~not he me~~I am far, far too old a man to be sexually confused~~praise Jesus~~but I am yet young enough to be politically confused~~is anyone not~~in an absolute sense~~I am a Catholic Royalist~~in a practical sense~~I am a Classical Liberal~~a Gaullist~~a Bonapartist~~an American Nationalist  Republican~~in either sense~~my head is soon for the chopping block~~to hasten my interlude with Madame La Guillotine~~I write without fear~and without favor of~any man.
          ~~
          Finis Origine Pendet…
          The escape commences…
          ~~
          September, 1957
          ~~
          Saint Jane Frances de Chantal Catholic parochial school, called, by anyone of any background, simply: “Chan~al,” a place where, of an autumn day in 1957, school,  for me,  began and ended in the first convening of the first grade in which a tiny nun, one Sister Dom Bosco, appeared before me, just behind the window appearing at far left of this photograph, and piped out this: “I may be small, but so then, is the Atom Bomb.”
          ~~
          My determination to escape school commenced immediately on hearing about this Atom Bomb business and took 16 dicey and arduous years to finally accomplish.~~
          ~~
          Non Sibi
          The declaration that:
          “I am here to save mankind,” means that:
          “I am here to rule mankind.”
          50574a838cafa7db2d6ff9751819c753
          The escape continues…
          ~~
          September, 1966
          ~~
          The Cathedral Latin School
          ~~
           Finis Origine Pendet
          ~~
          Κύριε ἐλέησον
          ~~

          Rejoice and Glad!!

          ~~

          Amen~~

          CUA_Cardinal_2008

          ~The Original Angry Bird~~The Catholic University of America Screaming Red Cardinal Mascot~~
          clip_image002MA9982782-0001
          ~~EX LIBRIS~~
          ~~
          THEOS EK MĒCHANĒS
          ~~
          16th Juin, Monday,  Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi, the 2020th
          
          Website: http://johndanielbegg.wordpress.com

          http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=122865699&trk=tab_pro

          http://www.facebook.com/JohnDanielBeggPublicAffairs
          http://www.tumblr.com/blog/theoldsoldiershome1952

          http://www.facebook.com/john.begg.33

          http://www.pinterest.com/johnbegg33/boards/

          http://independent.academia.edu/johnbegg/Papers?s=nav#add

          http://www.stumbleupon.com/stumbler/jtdbegg

          Tweets: @jtdbegg

          http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=122865699&trk=hb_tab_pro_top
          
          
          
          
          “Jean-Marie Le Pen is a friend. He is dangerous for the political set because he’s the only one who’s sincere. He says out loud what many people think deep down, and what the politicians refrain from saying because they are either too demagogic or too chicken. Le Pen, with all his faults and qualities, is probably the only one who thinks about the interests of France before his own.”~~
          Alain Delon~~Actor
          
          
          
          $T2eC16J,!)sE9swm(wv0BRPCJh43uQ~~60_57

          John Daniel Begg raises cotton.

          ~~

          In the Old South, the real Southland, we had a charming expression, when asked what an idle man did for a living:

          ~~

          “Oh, he raises cotton.”
          ~~
        • Which meant, he did absolutely nothing at all, as cotton,  “the white gold,” raises herself.

           

        • 11900068_728996890560925_4010112541193348700_n
        • Catholic and Royal Army - Wikipedia
          CONCEPT OF THE CATHOLIC AND ROYAL ARMY OF AMERICA (CRAA)

           

          THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA
          Logo of The Catholic University of America.svg
          Seal of The Catholic University of America

          Motto:

          ~~

          Deus Lux Mea Est

          ~~

          Acta Est Fabula

          The escape concludes…

          The Catholic University Of America, Washington, The Federal District of Columbia.

          Student walking across campus toward McMahon Hall

          1976, Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi.

          “Who first seduc'd them to that foul revolt?
          Th' infernal Serpent; he it was, whose guile
          Stird up with Envy and Revenge, deceiv'd
          The Mother of All Mankind"
          ~~
          Paradise Lost
          Book One
           Verse 35
           Our Mr Milton
          
           https://johndanielbegg.com/2016/03/09/the-infernal-serpent-he-it-was-whose-guile--stirred-up-with-envy-and-revenge-deceived-the-mother-of-mankind
          10325217_484127205047896_7255341654839362288_n.jpgbegg2
          How short the list one could compile of those of whom it can be said that fame and money did not deprave? 

          Acta Est Fabula.

          ~~

          Deus Vult.

          image002 (20)

      Ne plus ultra

      be21c107-c314-4fb3-a2e1-1bc2a6375f93

      10273429_475642092563074_3006900326038764208_n

      11825782_910686702310728_7422264639390513425_n

      Image may contain: 2 people, including Ellen Wolentarski Begg156587214Z

      Our Ubiquitous Presence

      ~~

      Our Queen

      queen-elizabeth-herbert-hoover

      Image result for photos of truman and princess elizabeth

      Our Queen now 68 years on

      ~~

      Simply the best President we could ever hope to have.

      Queen Elizabeth II Through the Years - Photos of Queen Elizabeth II

      Regina ~ Fortuna Imperatrix Mundi

       

      May, 1963– Steve McQueen tooling around LA in his Jaguar XK-SS. — Photograph by © John Dominis/ Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images. Local legend holds that at least one L.A. law-enforcement agency had promised its officers that an “expensive steak dinner” awaited the guy who could nail McQueen and the Jag with a speeding ticket. The tale continues that, while he was spotted often and even pursued a time or two, he was never caught and never written. The steak dinner went unclaimed. Another story refutes the entire affair, alleging that McQueen was so awash in speeding tickets he nearly lost his license.

      May, 1963– Steve McQueen driving his Jaguar XK-SS down Sunset Blvd, Hollywood, California. — Photograph by © John Dominis/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

This, for-profit, communist, organization is the final fruition of Malcolm Little, The Nation and Fidel.

The White Man Controls Everything

Make no mistake – BLM is a radical neo-Marxist political movement

Former Cuban Leader Fidel Castro Dies at 90 | TIME

***My thanks and good regards to The Telegraph of London and Alexandra Phillips for their well done and much need article today.***

The rapid spread of protests across the West under the Black Lives Matter banner has left a political breathlessness from Baltimore to Berlin. Those in positions of authority are scrambling to show they are addressing endemic racism, and in the commercial sphere, not ending up on the wrong side of the debate and risking Twitter storms and boycotts. In a world where nothing is exempt from moral judgment, being on trend means signing up to radical political movements.

That is what Black Lives Matter is. Don’t take my word for it. Take theirs. The form of words that appears on most online posts connected to the group riffs on ‘the black radical tradition’ which counts among its past contributors the Black Panther Movement and Malcom X. BLM happily self-identifies as a neo-Marxist movement with various far left objectives, including defunding the police (an evolution of the Panther position of public open-carry to control the police), to dismantling capitalism and the patriarchal system, disrupting the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure, seeking reparations from slavery to redistribute wealth and via various offshoot appeals, to raise money to bail black prisoners awaiting trial. The notion of seizing control of the apportionment of capital, dismantling the frameworks of society and neutralising and undermining law enforcement are not just Marxist, but anarchic.

Desperate to appease a vociferous clamour, celebrities and companies are queuing up to endorse. Airbnb has donated hundreds of thousands of dollars, an ironic move for a company that enables profiting from real estate through casual lets, driving up rental prices and gentrifying neighbourhoods, impacting on affordable leases in inner cities.

Shay (lilshay4life) on Pinterest 

Nike, which has come under fire for using sweatshops to manufacture unaffordable, ‘aspirational’ footwear to pitch to the poorest in society, is now striving for racial equality. Amazon has banned the police from using their facial recognition software in tackling crime, yet are happy to push for greater intrusion in the private sphere.

UK tea manufacturers, whose business was built on the back of slavery and operate under neo-colonial plantation models where tea is grown and picked through agrarian toil in the developing world to be shipped for production, packaging and profits in the West have jumped on the hashtag #Solidaritea. Post-truth absurdity is where we have reached. Yet as companies commercially conflate the tagline Black Lives Matter, with the movement Black Lives Matter, momentum builds for an organisation with little scrutiny or accountability, that is able to mobilise millions and encourage, wilfully or not, outpourings of vandalism, looting and violence across the West.

With enormous sums of money flooding in – BLM had already received over $100 million from the Open Society Foundations, Ford Foundation and Borealis Philanthropy among others – and many written aims straight from the Communist copybook, there is surely reason for concern. Black Lives Matter is a somewhat amorphous and decentralised movement, allowing international chapters to set up under their banner. Not having a structure, a figurehead or centralised financial control means there is absolutely no accountability. Nobody to call for an end to violence, while providing a moral shield behind which perpetrators of crime can feel emboldened.

But decentralisation does not mean disorganisation. Even with a captive audience under lockdown filled with frustration, sparking a range of parallel protests across the West still demands highly skilled choreography. The sort of operation that requires thousands of avatars to flood social media platforms with calls to action, that can target and penetrate entire demographics simultaneously across a range of countries. That is simply not possible by a group of well meaning activists, however romantic about a cause you may wish to be. It can be achieved using extremely high level, sensitive intelligence equipment of the kind deep state operatives have access to.

Throughout history civil rights movements have been either aided and abetted or exploited by Communist foreign actors, from the American civil rights movement to apartheid in South Africa. By sowing discord in countries, socialist activists have hoped to nurture fertile grounds for socio-political fecundity. It is well within the realms of possibility that state-backed cyber warfare emanating from Russia and China would want to exploit and exacerbate mounting discontent while the West is still reeling from the pandemic.

A once small American movement that witnessed bursts of activity after individual cases of perceived police brutality has become the most prominent protest movement in Europe, and polarises societies wherever it goes. Unlike predecessors that often fell on the swords of their figureheads, this movement remains impervious to the accountability of a leader, because there are many. What we do know of the few founding members is that many are connected to radical Left organisations. 

An FBI report released in 2017 found that attacks on police in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and Dallas, Texas were influenced by the Black Lives Matter movement, with 28 pe rcent of those who used deadly force against police officers motivated by a hatred of police. An unclassified FBI study following the Dallas cop-killing spree of 2016 that left 5 officers shot dead reported departments and individual officers increasingly taking the decision to stop proactive policing amid concerns that anti-police defiance fueled in part by movements like Black Lives Matter had become the “new norm.”

The sight of missiles being thrown at unarmed British police, with entire ranks forced to retreat from a baying mob should leave anybody who values national and community security with chills. Footage of an attack against a police officer and his colleague in Hackney attempting to apprehend an assault suspect showed members of the public filming the incident while one joined the fracas with a baseball bat. As statues are torn down and lists of demands are drawn up, sleepwalking towards lawlessness must terrify many members of the public.

The difficulty in raising criticism or calling for scrutiny of the movement, despite pulling in unimaginable revenue and endorsement from the biggest corporates, biggest names and most prominent political appeasers, is that it leaves the accuser open to being censored and attacked as a racist. As the movement establishes organised chapters across the West, is emboldened to make explicit commitments to extreme forms of socialism and anarchy, and generates a head of steam against the very structures and protections that have guarded Western society for decades, if all opposition is silenced and checks and balances swept aside, reversing a nascent tidal wave of mob rule will take significant and disturbing levels of force.

I support those who genuinely want to make the world a less prejudiced and more equal place, but there are many reasons to be concerned that Black Lives Matter is not enabling this, and instead is fostering division, chaos and destruction designed to bring the West to its knees – something that will harm the very people the movement purports to protect.

♥️🖤💚

***My thanks and good regards to The Telegraph of London and Alexandra Phillips for their well done and much need article today.***

IN THE NAME OF GOD.
AMEN
No alt text provided for this image
####################################################################
Index Librorum Prohibitorum
I wear the chain I forged in life.
article-2253237-00BCBB6C00000190-350_634x715

Image may contain: one or more people

How short the list one could compile of those of whom it can be said that fame and money did not deprave?

day3

IL MIGLIOR FABBRO

1147013_363612750432676_183433089_o

Image may contain: 1 person, closeup

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, suit

 At Washington, capital city of the terminally self-absorbed, mortal man holds to fleeting, feeble and fallible opinion, God immutable fact.

      • ~~
      • It is my assessment that America is dying inside, being eaten away by the horror of the collapse of the middle orders, the attendant societal and religious values and customs of those orders and the ubiquity of war making for dubious purpose.
      • ~~
      • The rich man ought not be taxed at all~~he ought be compelled to employ and train the poor man~~directly~~personally.

      ~~

      The principal need in America today is~~financial and industrial De-Globalization~~to facilitate the promotion of the possibility for the average man to get and keep a good job with good benefits paid by the employer~~as was done not very long ago.
      ~~
      ~~Bene Nati, Bene Vestiti, Et Mediocriter Docti~~
      ~

      ~~La crema y nata~~

      ~

      ~~Artista de la conquista

      ~~

      In sunshine and in shadow~~I hold tight to the Republican view of time and money~~I write night and day~~yet~~while impecunious~~I am vastly overpaid~~in that taking pay to do what I love is unfair~~to my employer~~in a fair system~~under such circumstances~~I should pay him~~not he me~~I am far, far too old a man to be sexually confused~~praise Jesus~~but I am yet young enough to be politically confused~~is anyone not~~in an absolute sense~~I am a Catholic Royalist~~in a practical sense~~I am a Classical Liberal~~a Gaullist~~a Bonapartist~~an American Nationalist  Republican~~in either sense~~my head is soon for the chopping block~~to hasten my interlude with Madame La Guillotine~~I write without fear~and without favor of~any man.

      unnamed (1) blue hats 3

      10374522_787949381332342_5064879056003089982_n

      550773_191188294341790_1993333795_n

      • At Washington, capital city of the terminally self-absorbed, mortal man holds to fleeting, feeble and fallible opinion, God immutable fact.
          • ~~
          • It is my assessment that America is dying inside, being eaten away by the horror of the collapse of the middle orders, the attendant societal and religious values and customs of those orders and the ubiquity of war making for dubious purpose.
          • ~~
          • The rich man ought not be taxed at all~~he ought be compelled to employ and train the poor man~~directly~~personally.

          ~~

          The principal need in America today is~~financial and industrial De-Globalization~~to facilitate the promotion of the possibility for the average man to get and keep a good job with good benefits paid by the employer~~as was done not very long ago.~~
          clip_image002MA9982782-0001

          CIRE PERDUE~

          ~~Bene Nati, Bene Vestiti, Et Mediocriter Docti~~
          ~

          ~~La crema y nata~~

          ~

          ~~Artista de la conquista

          ~~

          In sunshine and in shadow~~I hold tight to the Republican view of time and money~~I write night and day~~yet~~while impecunious~~I am vastly overpaid~~in that taking pay to do what I love is unfair~~to my employer~~in a fair system~~under such circumstances~~I should pay him~~not he me~~I am far, far too old a man to be sexually confused~~praise Jesus~~but I am yet young enough to be politically confused~~is anyone not~~in an absolute sense~~I am a Catholic Royalist~~in a practical sense~~I am a Classical Liberal~~a Gaullist~~a Bonapartist~~an American Nationalist  Republican~~in either sense~~my head is soon for the chopping block~~to hasten my interlude with Madame La Guillotine~~I write without fear~and without favor of~any man.
          ~~
          Finis Origine Pendet…
          The escape commences…
          ~~
          September, 1957
          ~~
          Saint Jane Frances de Chantal Catholic parochial school, called, by anyone of any background, simply: “Chan~al,” a place where, of an autumn day in 1957, school,  for me,  began and ended in the first convening of the first grade in which a tiny nun, one Sister Dom Bosco, appeared before me, just behind the window appearing at far left of this photograph, and piped out this: “I may be small, but so then, is the Atom Bomb.”
          ~~
          My determination to escape school commenced immediately on hearing about this Atom Bomb business and took 16 dicey and arduous years to finally accomplish.~~
          ~~
          Non Sibi
          The declaration that:
          “I am here to save mankind,” means that:
          “I am here to rule mankind.”
          50574a838cafa7db2d6ff9751819c753
          The escape continues…
          ~~
          September, 1966
          ~~
          The Cathedral Latin School
          ~~
           Finis Origine Pendet
          ~~
          Κύριε ἐλέησον
          ~~

          Rejoice and Glad!!

          ~~

          Amen~~

          CUA_Cardinal_2008

          ~The Original Angry Bird~~The Catholic University of America Screaming Red Cardinal Mascot~~
          clip_image002MA9982782-0001
          ~~EX LIBRIS~~
          ~~
          THEOS EK MĒCHANĒS
          ~~
          19th Mai, Tuesday,  Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi, the 2020th
          
          Website: http://johndanielbegg.wordpress.com

          http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=122865699&trk=tab_pro

          http://www.facebook.com/JohnDanielBeggPublicAffairs
          http://www.tumblr.com/blog/theoldsoldiershome1952

          http://www.facebook.com/john.begg.33

          http://www.pinterest.com/johnbegg33/boards/

          http://independent.academia.edu/johnbegg/Papers?s=nav#add

          http://www.stumbleupon.com/stumbler/jtdbegg

          Tweets: @jtdbegg

          http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=122865699&trk=hb_tab_pro_top
          
          
          
          
          “Jean-Marie Le Pen is a friend. He is dangerous for the political set because he’s the only one who’s sincere. He says out loud what many people think deep down, and what the politicians refrain from saying because they are either too demagogic or too chicken. Le Pen, with all his faults and qualities, is probably the only one who thinks about the interests of France before his own.”~~
          Alain Delon~~Actor
          
          
          
          $T2eC16J,!)sE9swm(wv0BRPCJh43uQ~~60_57

          John Daniel Begg raises cotton.

          ~~

          In the Old South, the real Southland, we had a charming expression, when asked what an idle man did for a living:

          ~~

          “Oh, he raises cotton.”
          ~~
        • Which meant, he did absolutely nothing at all, as cotton,  “the white gold,” raises herself.

           

        • 11900068_728996890560925_4010112541193348700_n
        • Catholic and Royal Army - Wikipedia
          CONCEPT OF THE CATHOLIC AND ROYAL ARMY OF AMERICA (CRAA)

           

          THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA
          Logo of The Catholic University of America.svg
          Seal of The Catholic University of America

          Motto:

          ~~

          Deus Lux Mea Est

          ~~

          Acta Est Fabula

          The escape concludes…

          The Catholic University Of America, Washington, The Federal District of Columbia.

          Student walking across campus toward McMahon Hall

          1976, Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi.

          “Who first seduc'd them to that foul revolt?
          Th' infernal Serpent; he it was, whose guile
          Stird up with Envy and Revenge, deceiv'd
          The Mother of All Mankind"
          ~~
          Paradise Lost
          Book One
           Verse 35
           Our Mr Milton
          
           https://johndanielbegg.com/2016/03/09/the-infernal-serpent-he-it-was-whose-guile--stirred-up-with-envy-and-revenge-deceived-the-mother-of-mankind
          10325217_484127205047896_7255341654839362288_n.jpgbegg2
          How short the list one could compile of those of whom it can be said that fame and money did not deprave? 

          Acta Est Fabula.

          ~~

          Deus Vult.

          image002 (20)

      Ne plus ultra

      be21c107-c314-4fb3-a2e1-1bc2a6375f93

      10273429_475642092563074_3006900326038764208_n

      11825782_910686702310728_7422264639390513425_n

      Image may contain: 2 people, including Ellen Wolentarski Begg156587214Z

      Our Ubiquitous Presence

      ~~

      Our Queen

      queen-elizabeth-herbert-hoover

      Image result for photos of truman and princess elizabeth

      Our Queen now 68 years on

      ~~

      Simply the best President we could ever hope to have.

      Queen Elizabeth II Through the Years - Photos of Queen Elizabeth II

      Regina ~ Fortuna Imperatrix Mundi

       

      May, 1963– Steve McQueen tooling around LA in his Jaguar XK-SS. — Photograph by © John Dominis/ Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images. Local legend holds that at least one L.A. law-enforcement agency had promised its officers that an “expensive steak dinner” awaited the guy who could nail McQueen and the Jag with a speeding ticket. The tale continues that, while he was spotted often and even pursued a time or two, he was never caught and never written. The steak dinner went unclaimed. Another story refutes the entire affair, alleging that McQueen was so awash in speeding tickets he nearly lost his license.

      May, 1963– Steve McQueen driving his Jaguar XK-SS down Sunset Blvd, Hollywood, California. — Photograph by © John Dominis/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

“Poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world.” Percy Bysshe Shelley

Man is now God:

Percy Bysshe Shelley was a very pretty young man with very sad eyes, who left us terribly young, lost at sea, and yet managed a wonderful surprise for us–one of the best poems ever penned and, for having penned it, insured his immortality.  Yet, very wisely, he did not pretend to be God.

~~

In this, our, on-going, chronicle of the suicidal saga of a young and restless people called the Americans in the fading light of their late First Empire wherein, vanity run all amok we find:

~~

Man was made God and dwelt amongst them.

~~  

As man’s seemingly, ungovernable vanity, is our topic this day, we are wise to visit with also here, very briefly, Aristotle, Stalin, Hitler, Mao of the Chinese and, thank God, young Shelly for our closing poem, Ozymandias, itself a derivative reference to Ramesses II, the Great One, third Egyptian Pharaoh, and yet another in an endless line of  Tin Gods with very high opinions of themselves and yet, somehow, despite their grandeur, today largely lost and forgotten to Lady History, and on tomorrow, forever neglected and ignored by Her.

~~~

Aristotle cautions us that the highest attainment of man is to: think.

~~

That is what he would have us do to be free men and wise.

~~

To spend all our day: thinking.

~~

The Americans are a juvenile and boastful people who, today, are not fond of thinking at all, much yet all day long, but they are very fond of preening pomposity and they say—thus, brashly:

~~

“There is no coincidence in life, I make my own coincidence!!”

~~

This is odd as, if the Americans were to think—not all day–just a bit–about this comment, they would realize it for the rash braggadocio and silliness that it is.

~~

Beyond dispute, all is coincidence.  All is accident.  We experience the accident of birth, marriage, leaving home 5 minutes too early or too late and getting into, or not getting into, a fatal car crash, being in the right place or wrong place politically when the wheel goes ‘round–accidents of history–accidents of life.  Your stocks and bonds go up or down.  You control nothing.  There is nothing to brag about.

~~

The Americans, are disposed by their frisky young traditions to entertain all manner of  feints of vanity.

~~

They will tell you:

~~

“Luck?? I make my own luck!!”

~~

You make your own luck, do you?

~~

Well now.

~~

Remarkable.

~~

To say that:

~~

“I make my own luck!!” is

chiefly remarkable because luck is, of definition:

~~

Coincidental good fortune.

~~

Accidental, transitory, victory.

~~

The Americans of this present time are very boastful and vain.

~~

This vanity is both painful and hilarious to watch.

~~

The ultimate vanity of course is for man to presume to become:

~~

God.

~~

The Americans did not invent this presumption and will not be the last civilization to cultivate this whimsical idea.

~~

Very recently in history Joseph Stalin, Man of Steelprovides us a good case study in this vanity.

~~

Stalin was virtually illiterate, save a few years in a seminary school to train to wear God’s cloth, an education he shared with both Mr. Hitler and your writer.

~~

Despite his poverty and lack of book learning, Stalin, like Hitler, understood uncannily the nature of the people he used to further his monstrous vanities and lusts for power and dominion.

~~

As Hitler, who was by blood an Austrian and not a German, and yet somehow fully understood the Germans and which of their buttons to push when, Stalin, who was a Georgian and not a Russian, understood the Russians as did no other leader they have ever had.

~~

Stalin had an intuitive sense of the Russians that is truly remarkable to contemplate.

~~

He used this intuitive knowledge not only to subjugate and murder the Russians but likewise to make himself into:

~~

Russia Herself.

~~

The Russians are a very sad, very simple, people to observe through the lens of history.

~~

The Russian people understand only three things–nothing more:

~~

God and His Church, The Emperor and the Motherland.

~~

Stalin, the illiterate, systematically became all three of these touchstones.

~~

Becoming the Emperor was easy.  After Stalin’s sponsor, the frail and mentally confused Mr. Lenin, went to meet his Maker, or wherever communists imagine they go when they leave this globe, Stalin took power with a gun and became the New Emperor.

~~

Stalin then proceeded to become God, literally.

~~

All the icons of the Church were torn down and burned.

~~

The priests were beheaded, a decapitation so symbolic that the simple Russians understood that Stalin was now God.

~~

All ornaments that hung inside the doors of all Russians, no matter how low their station, were taken down and, by decree, replaced with portraits and visages of the new God, Stalin.

~~

At, what had been celebration of Christmas and other civilized, high feasts, Stalin’s smiling image was adorned with festive wreaths and lights—he was indeed God—the Babe Jesus Himself.

~~

To become the:

~~

Motherland Herself, was a tad more dicey a vanity to satisfy—but here, his erstwhile ally, Mr. Hitler, lent a hand in the summer of 1941, by invading Russia.

~~

After a fortnight of frenzied, alcoholic haze in his dacha outside Moscow, a stunned Stalin observed the arrival of his high command, of men who had been unwilling to act without his command, and Stalin thought the game was finally up for him.

~~

The Man of Steel assumed he would be arrested and butchered as he had done so many times to so many others himself.

~~

Instead, the high command, not realizing his momentary weakness, held Stalin high aloft and made him their leader at war—they made him:

~~

Russia Herself.

~~

Stalin is now remembered as a terrible tyrant, if he is remembered at all—and as the world hurdles forward, he is less and less remembered at all.

~~  

But for this:

~~

I remember him here because his singular vanity, to presume to become God, is now a vanity of the Americans.

~~

The, now complete, addiction to the notion that man can become God is an American vanity acquired gradually.

~~

Many of the unlettered are today fond of saying for instance: “I am spiritual but not religious,” a hilarious comment, utterly devoid of meaning always tendered with the greatest of doe-eyed, feminine, earnestness.

~~

When I ask, both quizzically and comically:

~~

“Well, I see, you are spiritual but not religious—I can’t think what the devil that means–please tell me now,” none can answer–such is the vapidity of modernism.

~~

They don’t know what it means—this, their own profession of the new faith.

~~

Those who are called today among the Americans “progressives”—a very odd word given progressivism’s invidious intentions, realize, as did Stalin, that banishing God is a most necessary precursor to making Man into God.

~~

That is the objective—not to be without God but to instead: become God.

~~

So, we “progress,” from God made man—Christmas Day—to Man made God—progressivism.

~~

Man’s vanity never ceases and is both startling and hilarious at one and the same time.

~~

In keeping with the objective to make man God, we are told:

~~

“I do not believe in a Creator or in any afterlife—heaven and hell and all that sort is for hillbillies.”

~~

I see.

~~

The, for now, dominant, strain in American culture being progressivism, man will soon think himself successful in having become God.

~~

Man will control the weather and the ebb and flow of the tides and the seas we are told, as man progresses to be God.

~~

Well, well, my, my.

~~

Mr. Stalin would be jealous of our brashness.

~~

The Americans, as earlier with Mr. Stalin, as with Mr. Hitler and Mr. Mao of the Chinese, will be very disappointed in their overreach in attempting to replace God with man.

~~

These three named earlier tyrants are all gone now and forgotten to most but for old men such as myself, and, very, very soon, to all men.

~~

The Americans are a kindly, strikingly and uniquely charitable, but silly and hopelessly young people.

~~

They cannot remember, if many of them ever knew, of the vanity of man through history.

~~

Their present day Tin Gods, who boast they will raise and lower the seas and likewise control the ebb and flow of the tides and control the storms and the temperatures up and down will be not ever become True God but remain mere mortals, who will shortly pass on to, wherever it is that:

~~

Spiritual, but not religious, progressives think they go when they die and–horror of horrors, be forgotten, in the blink of an eye.

~~

The onrush of history is savage, relentless and swift.

~~

No man endures, all crumble and die and new tyrants holding fast to new vanities arise, have their brief moment in the sun and then, simply vanish into oblivion.

~~

The Americans, in this, our saga of their late first Empire, evidence a singular silliness.

~~

The American progressives seek to mock God and His Believers, yet they wish desperately to become God themselves and assume His Duties.

~~

What greater vanity could man divine than that?

~~

The Americans are a hopelessly young people, just getting their sea legs, really.

~~

As such, they should be forgiven freshmen errors to a very large extent.

~~

Yet, their vanity is today, of a fully mature, upper classman’s,  presentation.

Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822) - Joseph Severn as art print or ...

I am both saddened and amazed by the Americans.

~~

They held such promise for the world.

~~

Yet today we have men of prominence in the nation who seek an office far, far, too high to reach.

~~

Rather than be satisfied, and, yes, humbled, by high office and positions in government ministries, American men today seek to be God Himself.

~~

This can never be and is comedic to consider really.

~~

I am sanguine they will not, but duty compels I suggest they read this startlingly riveting, wonderfully beautiful,  poem on the vanity of man, likely the best admonition ever penned about just:

~~

How great thou art not:

NPG 4243; Lord Byron - Portrait - National Portrait Gallery

Ozymandias

I met a traveler from an antique land,

Who said:

`Two vast and trunkless legs of stone,


Stand in the desert.

Near them, on the sand,


Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,


And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,


Tell that its sculptor well those passions read.


Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,


The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed.


And on the pedestal these words appear —


“My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:


Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!”


Nothing beside remains.

Round the decay


Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare


The lone and level sands stretch far away.’

Percy Bysshe Shelley

~~

1792-1822

Mary Shelley's Nightmare: Fuseli and the Aesthetics of ...

~~
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IN THE NAME OF GOD.
AMEN
####################################################################
I wear the chain I forged in life.
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How short the list one could compile of those of whom it can be said that fame and money did not deprave?

day3

IL MIGLIOR FABBRO

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 At Washington, capital city of the terminally self-absorbed, mortal man holds to fleeting, feeble and fallible opinion, God immutable fact.

      • ~~
      • It is my assessment that America is dying inside, being eaten away by the horror of the collapse of the middle orders, the attendant societal and religious values and customs of those orders and the ubiquity of war making for dubious purpose.
      • ~~
      • The rich man ought not be taxed at all~~he ought be compelled to employ and train the poor man~~directly~~personally.

      ~~

      The principal need in America today is~~financial and industrial De-Globalization~~to facilitate the promotion of the possibility for the average man to get and keep a good job with good benefits paid by the employer~~as was done not very long ago.
      ~~
      ~~Bene Nati, Bene Vestiti, Et Mediocriter Docti~~
      ~

      ~~La crema y nata~~

      ~

      ~~Artista de la conquista

      ~~

      In sunshine and in shadow~~I hold tight to the Republican view of time and money~~I write night and day~~yet~~while impecunious~~I am vastly overpaid~~in that taking pay to do what I love is unfair~~to my employer~~in a fair system~~under such circumstances~~I should pay him~~not he me~~I am far, far too old a man to be sexually confused~~praise Jesus~~but I am yet young enough to be politically confused~~is anyone not~~in an absolute sense~~I am a Catholic Royalist~~in a practical sense~~I am a Classical Liberal~~a Gaullist~~a Bonapartist~~an American Nationalist  Republican~~in either sense~~my head is soon for the chopping block~~to hasten my interlude with Madame La Guillotine~~I write without fear~and without favor of~any man.

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      • At Washington, capital city of the terminally self-absorbed, mortal man holds to fleeting, feeble and fallible opinion, God immutable fact.
          • ~~
          • It is my assessment that America is dying inside, being eaten away by the horror of the collapse of the middle orders, the attendant societal and religious values and customs of those orders and the ubiquity of war making for dubious purpose.
          • ~~
          • The rich man ought not be taxed at all~~he ought be compelled to employ and train the poor man~~directly~~personally.

          ~~

          The principal need in America today is~~financial and industrial De-Globalization~~to facilitate the promotion of the possibility for the average man to get and keep a good job with good benefits paid by the employer~~as was done not very long ago.~~
          clip_image002MA9982782-0001

          CIRE PERDUE~

          ~~Bene Nati, Bene Vestiti, Et Mediocriter Docti~~
          ~

          ~~La crema y nata~~

          ~

          ~~Artista de la conquista

          ~~

          In sunshine and in shadow~~I hold tight to the Republican view of time and money~~I write night and day~~yet~~while impecunious~~I am vastly overpaid~~in that taking pay to do what I love is unfair~~to my employer~~in a fair system~~under such circumstances~~I should pay him~~not he me~~I am far, far too old a man to be sexually confused~~praise Jesus~~but I am yet young enough to be politically confused~~is anyone not~~in an absolute sense~~I am a Catholic Royalist~~in a practical sense~~I am a Classical Liberal~~a Gaullist~~a Bonapartist~~an American Nationalist  Republican~~in either sense~~my head is soon for the chopping block~~to hasten my interlude with Madame La Guillotine~~I write without fear~and without favor of~any man.
          ~~
          Finis Origine Pendet…
          The escape commences…
          ~~
          September, 1957
          ~~
          Saint Jane Frances de Chantal Catholic parochial school, called, by anyone of any background, simply: “Chan~al,” a place where, of an autumn day in 1957, school,  for me,  began and ended in the first convening of the first grade in which a tiny nun, one Sister Dom Bosco, appeared before me, just behind the window appearing at far left of this photograph, and piped out this: “I may be small, but so then, is the Atom Bomb.”
          ~~
          My determination to escape school commenced immediately on hearing about this Atom Bomb business and took 16 dicey and arduous years to finally accomplish.~~
          ~~
          Non Sibi
          The declaration that:
          “I am here to save mankind,” means that:
          “I am here to rule mankind.”
          50574a838cafa7db2d6ff9751819c753
          The escape continues…
          ~~
          September, 1966
          ~~
          The Cathedral Latin School
          ~~
           Finis Origine Pendet
          ~~
          Κύριε ἐλέησον
          ~~

          Rejoice and Glad!!

          ~~

          Amen~~

          CUA_Cardinal_2008

          ~The Original Angry Bird~~The Catholic University of America Screaming Red Cardinal Mascot~~
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          ~~EX LIBRIS~~
          ~~
          THEOS EK MĒCHANĒS
          ~~
          12th Juin, Friday,  Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi, the 2020th
          
          Website: http://johndanielbegg.wordpress.com

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          Tweets: @jtdbegg

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          “Jean-Marie Le Pen is a friend. He is dangerous for the political set because he’s the only one who’s sincere. He says out loud what many people think deep down, and what the politicians refrain from saying because they are either too demagogic or too chicken. Le Pen, with all his faults and qualities, is probably the only one who thinks about the interests of France before his own.”~~
          Alain Delon~~Actor
          
          
          
          
          
          
          $T2eC16J,!)sE9swm(wv0BRPCJh43uQ~~60_57

          John Daniel Begg raises cotton.

          ~~

          In the Old South, the real Southland, we had a charming expression, when asked what an idle man did for a living:

          ~~

          “Oh, he raises cotton.”
          ~~
        • Which meant, he did absolutely nothing at all, as cotton,  “the white gold,” raises herself.

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          CONCEPT OF THE CATHOLIC AND ROYAL ARMY OF AMERICA (CRAA)

          THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA
          Logo of The Catholic University of America.svg
          Seal of The Catholic University of America

          Motto:

          ~~

          Deus Lux Mea Est

          ~~

          Acta Est Fabula

          The escape concludes…

          The Catholic University Of America, Washington, The Federal District of Columbia.

          Student walking across campus toward McMahon Hall

          1976, Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi.

          “Who first seduc'd them to that foul revolt?
          Th' infernal Serpent; he it was, whose guile
          Stird up with Envy and Revenge, deceiv'd
          The Mother of All Mankind"
          ~~
          Paradise Lost
          Book One
           Verse 35
           Our Mr Milton
          
           https://johndanielbegg.com/2016/03/09/the-infernal-serpent-he-it-was-whose-guile--stirred-up-with-envy-and-revenge-deceived-the-mother-of-mankind
          10325217_484127205047896_7255341654839362288_n.jpgbegg2
          How short the list one could compile of those of whom it can be said that fame and money did not deprave? 

          Acta Est Fabula.

          ~~

          Deus Vult.

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      Ne plus ultra

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      Our Ubiquitous Presence

      ~~

      Our Queen

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      Our Queen now 68 years on

      ~~

      Simply the best President we could ever hope to have.

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      Regina ~ Fortuna Imperatrix Mundi

Jean Bugatti with his car, Bugatti Royale ‘Esders’ Roadster, 1932.